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mynameisrodney

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I don't know why this needs to descend to crap like that, but yes I have. I have not been pressure fermenting long though.

I went to 30psi on my first pressure ferment, because I underestimated how quickly the pressure would build up, and made the dumb decision to wait until the next morning to dial in my spunding valve.
 

mynameisrodney

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Good to see some constructive conversation on this thread, this is what it should be all about, well played Rodney, though you are left with quite a lot of trub and beer in the fermenter you are willing to share the downside.
I was not left with a lot of beer. I was left with a lot of trub because I leave essentially none in the kettle.
 

Lorenzo99

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For **** sake just keep it on topic, keg king guys arguing with home brewers again after reading the last 2 pages the stale taste left in my mouth from the keg king employees has made sure I will not purchase anything from them again, It's deadset less than childish! I returned to this forum after a few years away due to this bullshit hoping it would have improved not gotten worse.
 

malt and barley blues

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For **** sake just keep it on topic, keg king guys arguing with home brewers again after reading the last 2 pages the stale taste left in my mouth from the keg king employees has made sure I will not purchase anything from them again, It's deadset less than childish! I returned to this forum after a few years away due to this bullshit hoping it would have improved not gotten worse.
That's the magic word FORUM a place for discussion and exchange of ideas, but it seems that if the ideas do not represent a favourable view of Keg Land products then anyone making them are a Keg King employee. As posted earlier no constructive criticism or debate allowed
Certainly seems apt for this thread.
I sorta think you are wasting time on this thread weal no constructive criticism allowed.
 

mynameisrodney

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That's the magic word FORUM a place for discussion and exchange of ideas, but it seems that if the ideas do not represent a favourable view of Keg Land products then anyone making them are a Keg King employee. As posted earlier no constructive criticism or debate allowed
Certainly seems apt for this thread.
As I have repeated many times now, I am all for constructive criticism, and in the last 10 or so pages I am actually the only one who has provided any. What I am completely against is lies and propaganda, which this thread is full of. After calling people out on this they have moved on to insults which is real mature.
 

malt and barley blues

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As I have repeated many times now, I am all for constructive criticism, and in the last 10 or so pages I am actually the only one who has provided any. What I am completely against is lies and propaganda, which this thread is full of. After calling people out on this they have moved on to insults which is real mature.
I am with you there I hate vile lies, propaganda and insults, where were they?
 

mynameisrodney

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All through the last few pages claiming you have to leave a tonne of beer behind in an all rounder. Snarky replies about me being a beginner. Easy to find.
 

malt and barley blues

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All through the last few pages claiming you have to leave a tonne of beer behind in an all rounder. Snarky replies about me being a beginner. Easy to find.
I don't think being called a beginner is an insult, you did say you have only just started pressure fermenting. does look like a fair bit of trub in there, did you cold crash to compact the yeast and any dry hops, makes a big difference.
 

mynameisrodney

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While I do agree that there is nothing wrong with being a beginner, the comments were certainly meant to be insulting.

I do cold crash. For those used to looking at a snub nose, the pic may have been deceiving. There is ~1.5L of trub in there, the round bottom means it's spread out and looks like more than there is. I dry hop loose, BIAB with a fine crush, and leave very little in the kettle, so I have more trub in the fermenter. This has never been an issue for me in any way.

In any case, the amount of trub in my fermenter is completely off topic as to whether or not the fermenter is doing its job.
 

toddyboy

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I'm making the move up from bucket brewing to brewing with a FZ I bought last year. I have a few questions which, form reading other sources, have contradicting info.

Basically, I have a FZ and want to transfer it to bottles when done. From my reading, fermenting under pressure looks like a good way to avoid waiting a few weeks for the beer to carbonate. I'm all for that. I have a CO2 bottle, a spunding valve and will use a hose with a ball valve to transfer to the bottles. I have my FZ set up in a temperature controlled fermenting fridge.

My questions are:
  1. When do I put the liquid under pressure? As soon as I sprinkle the yeast on top? I've seen videos on how to use the spunding valve. The beer I'll be brewing will use around 9psi. I was thinking of leaving the spunding valve open from the start to let the yeast start the process and then close the spunding valve to my desired pressure once the fermentation has stopped.
  2. Cold crashing. Do I just drop the temperature of my fermentation fridge to 2 degrees for a day or so once the fermenting is done and let the carbonation do its thing then transfer?
  3. Dry hopping seems interesting with the FZ. I'm assuming I close the valve, remove collection jar trub, replace with collection jar with hops in it, purge with CO2 and slowly open the valve again?
Long term, I'll get a corny keg to serve my beer from then graduate to all grain brewing once I have more room and pots, etc. to do the job.
 

kadmium

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I'm making the move up from bucket brewing to brewing with a FZ I bought last year. I have a few questions which, form reading other sources, have contradicting info.

Basically, I have a FZ and want to transfer it to bottles when done. From my reading, fermenting under pressure looks like a good way to avoid waiting a few weeks for the beer to carbonate. I'm all for that. I have a CO2 bottle, a spunding valve and will use a hose with a ball valve to transfer to the bottles. I have my FZ set up in a temperature controlled fermenting fridge.

My questions are:
  1. When do I put the liquid under pressure? As soon as I sprinkle the yeast on top? I've seen videos on how to use the spunding valve. The beer I'll be brewing will use around 9psi. I was thinking of leaving the spunding valve open from the start to let the yeast start the process and then close the spunding valve to my desired pressure once the fermentation has stopped.
  2. Cold crashing. Do I just drop the temperature of my fermentation fridge to 2 degrees for a day or so once the fermenting is done and let the carbonation do its thing then transfer?
  3. Dry hopping seems interesting with the FZ. I'm assuming I close the valve, remove collection jar trub, replace with collection jar with hops in it, purge with CO2 and slowly open the valve again?
Long term, I'll get a corny keg to serve my beer from then graduate to all grain brewing once I have more room and pots, etc. to do the job.
Hey mate, congrats on coming to the darkside of pressure fermentation. Don't let anyone try and tell you it's 'no good for the yeast' (imagine that in a snarky voice).

I don't think 9PSI is going to be enough if you intend on not carbing in the bottle naturally. Bear in mind, 9PSI at 18 odd degrees is not the same as 9PSI at 2 degrees. So you will most probably have to ferment near the edge of pressure. Otherwise, ferment under normal pressure, cold crash, then put the gas on for a week to carb in the fermenter at 10ish PSI and THEN bottle.

Also consider counter pressure bottle fillers (even a home jobbie with a bung and some tube) to ensure you keep carbonation!

Ok, so in relation to:

1. I apply pressure as soon as I put the yeast in. This way I can set my spunding valve to the right pressure straight away, otherwise I forget. You could argue that this reduces the oxygen saturation in the fermenter however you should have properly oxygenated the wort itself, so yeah.

If you're not going to pre pressurise, I suggest leaving your spunder set so each time it's pre set. It can be a bit fiddley to get right.

2. Cold crashing should be 24 hours ONCE it hits 2 degrees (in my opinion) so I would allow 2 days for it. Just my opinion.

3. Can't comment on using the bottle as I dryhop using a snub nose, however give the hopsock with magnet a go. I think it's easier, neater and completely oxygen free!
 

Grmblz

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I was not left with a lot of beer. I was left with a lot of trub because I leave essentially none in the kettle.
Rodney this is nonsense.
You want constructive criticism?
First off, as much trub as is possible is NOT! allowed in the fermenter, PERIOD! That means whirlpool the kettle. Just bloody Google it.
Second, a larger surface area for a given volume results in a thinner layer (we're talking sucking beer off the yeast sediment without disturbing the yeast) a thicker layer is obviously better, so the narrower the vessel the thicker the layer of liquid and ultimately the less that is left behind. This is why I made my previous comments to you, may I suggest you re-read your responses to me, there was no "lies or propaganda" just basic common sense and alternative suggestions.
Finally this thread is for "Fermzilla" yeh I know we get a bit side tracked, but maybe start an "all rounder"/"under pressure" thread or whatever, end of day despite the odd wanker most people here are only too happy to help, but there's none so blind that don't want to see.
Cheers G
 

frosty3

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I'm making the move up from bucket brewing to brewing with a FZ I bought last year. I have a few questions which, form reading other sources, have contradicting info.

Basically, I have a FZ and want to transfer it to bottles when done. From my reading, fermenting under pressure looks like a good way to avoid waiting a few weeks for the beer to carbonate. I'm all for that. I have a CO2 bottle, a spunding valve and will use a hose with a ball valve to transfer to the bottles. I have my FZ set up in a temperature controlled fermenting fridge.

My questions are:
  1. When do I put the liquid under pressure? As soon as I sprinkle the yeast on top? I've seen videos on how to use the spunding valve. The beer I'll be brewing will use around 9psi. I was thinking of leaving the spunding valve open from the start to let the yeast start the process and then close the spunding valve to my desired pressure once the fermentation has stopped.
  2. Cold crashing. Do I just drop the temperature of my fermentation fridge to 2 degrees for a day or so once the fermenting is done and let the carbonation do its thing then transfer?
  3. Dry hopping seems interesting with the FZ. I'm assuming I close the valve, remove collection jar trub, replace with collection jar with hops in it, purge with CO2 and slowly open the valve again?
Long term, I'll get a corny keg to serve my beer from then graduate to all grain brewing once I have more room and pots, etc. to do the job.
What I do to dry hop is. Let the pressure out. Close the valve. Remove the collection bottle. Clean bottle and the bottom of the valve. Add hops. Re-attach. Flush with c02. Pressurises the collection bottle to about 15psi. Then open the valve as fast as you can.

In terms of filling bottles from the fermenter your best bet is using a bottling gun that you can flush the bottle with c02 first to minimise oxidation. If that’s out of the budget at the moment try a bottling wand or something so you can fill from the bottom of the bottle. Then you want have a little bit of foam on the top that overflows a little. Put the cap on straight away so that all the oxygen is pushed out. Same method applies if you are using a bottling gun.
 

Grok

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After many frustrating attempts (since new) to tighten to seal effectively and undo the collection bottle because it won't move, and with the plastic bowing and almost breaking due to the force I have apply to get it to move with the strap spanner supplied, I have been able to at least make it more civilised with the careful smoothing of the sealing surface opposite the O ring with fine emery paper, and then application of microfine Graphite powder on the O ring and adjacent sealing surface plus the threads as well. Also chamfer the squared entry edge so the O ring can get a easy start into the compressed sealing area of the body. Then take a hard smooth round object to "Burnish" (rub) the graphite into the surfaces to impregnate better.

Under magnification the surfaces are pitted and I believe this grips the O ring to much generating to much friction to easily break free to turn, and provides a somewhat poor seal as well, bad quality control, no excuse for this in my opinion!

I have done a few brews since and it has been much better at taking the bowl on and off.

DSC_0306.JPGDSC_0310.JPGDSC_0311.JPGDSC_0313.JPGDSC_0314.JPGDSC_0315.JPG
 
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kadmium

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That's a lot of work for something that should just work out of the box. I think overall it's a very complicated system (both versions) which is going to be prone to issues like leaks etc.

Glad you got it sorted though
 

toddyboy

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Apologies for my delayed response. Had a birthday and father's day to get some more equipment :cool:

Hey mate, congrats on coming to the darkside of pressure fermentation. Don't let anyone try and tell you it's 'no good for the yeast' (imagine that in a snarky voice).

I don't think 9PSI is going to be enough if you intend on not carbing in the bottle naturally. Bear in mind, 9PSI at 18 odd degrees is not the same as 9PSI at 2 degrees. So you will most probably have to ferment near the edge of pressure. Otherwise, ferment under normal pressure, cold crash, then put the gas on for a week to carb in the fermenter at 10ish PSI and THEN bottle.

Also consider counter pressure bottle fillers (even a home jobbie with a bung and some tube) to ensure you keep carbonation!

Ok, so in relation to:

1. I apply pressure as soon as I put the yeast in. This way I can set my spunding valve to the right pressure straight away, otherwise I forget. You could argue that this reduces the oxygen saturation in the fermenter however you should have properly oxygenated the wort itself, so yeah.

If you're not going to pre pressurise, I suggest leaving your spunder set so each time it's pre set. It can be a bit fiddley to get right.

2. Cold crashing should be 24 hours ONCE it hits 2 degrees (in my opinion) so I would allow 2 days for it. Just my opinion.

3. Can't comment on using the bottle as I dryhop using a snub nose, however give the hopsock with magnet a go. I think it's easier, neater and completely oxygen free!
Appreciate your reply. My latest effort since my post didn't go too well. I misread your post and put the CO2 in straight away which seemed to screw up the yeast. It got blown around the FV and then sunk into the wort and didn't seem to ferment too much if at all. Add to that my spunding valve didn't want to hold any pressure so I had to get another one. I also messed up the valve going into the collection jar and had that closed when I put the wort and yeast in then opened it when I realised the error of my way. That also caused a big commotion in the fermenter which further messed up my brew.

What I do to dry hop is. Let the pressure out. Close the valve. Remove the collection bottle. Clean bottle and the bottom of the valve. Add hops. Re-attach. Flush with c02. Pressurises the collection bottle to about 15psi. Then open the valve as fast as you can.

In terms of filling bottles from the fermenter your best bet is using a bottling gun that you can flush the bottle with c02 first to minimise oxidation. If that’s out of the budget at the moment try a bottling wand or something so you can fill from the bottom of the bottle. Then you want have a little bit of foam on the top that overflows a little. Put the cap on straight away so that all the oxygen is pushed out. Same method applies if you are using a bottling gun.
Because my brew seemed to screw up, I didn't want to waste the hops so I just skipped that step. I got myself a bottling gun which I'll test out today to make sure I use it right on my next brew.

I also got myself a carb stone. Seems as though I forgot about that piece of equipment. For my next brew, probably next weekend, I'll be doing the following:
  • Brew as normal
  • Attach carb stone and hose to inner gas post of FZ
  • Attach spunding valve to outside of gas post of FZ, probably set to about 12psi
  • Let yeast do its thing in my fermenting fridge at the right temp
  • Dry hop using frosty3's method above
  • When FG is reached, turn temp controller off and just use fridge temp to bring brew temp down to roughly 2 degrees
  • After 24-48 hours, remove spunding valve and replace with CO2 line to carb the brew
  • About 24 hours later, use bottling gun to bottle beer and drink almost right away
Have I missed anything there or done something wrong? Any tips are greatly appreciated.
 
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Because my brew seemed to screw up, I didn't want to waste the hops so I just skipped that step. I got myself a bottling gun which I'll test out today to make sure I use it right on my next brew.

I also got myself a carb stone. Seems as though I forgot about that piece of equipment. For my next brew, probably next weekend, I'll be doing the following:
  • Brew as normal
  • Attach carb stone and hose to inner gas post of FZ
  • Attach spunding valve to outside of gas post of FZ, probably set to about 12psi
  • Let yeast do its thing in my fermenting fridge at the right temp
  • Dry hop using frosty3's method above
  • When FG is reached, turn temp controller off and just use fridge temp to bring brew temp down to roughly 2 degrees
  • After 24-48 hours, remove spunding valve and replace with CO2 line to carb the brew
  • About 24 hours later, use bottling gun to bottle beer and drink almost right away
Have I missed anything there or done something wrong? Any tips are greatly appreciated.
If I am reading your post right, things seem to go pear shaped after, Brew as normal.
Attach the carb stone and the spunding valve on the gas post? The spunding valve is to control the pressure above the wort.
Tossing the dry hops in through the top is far easier than mucking around with collection bottles.
Fit your spunding valve set at required pressure
When FG is reached I would go into the diacetyl rest phase for a couple of days, at the same temperature.
Drop temperature to dissolve the CO2 into the beer then attach the carbing stone.
 

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