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Yeast - Stir or Spread?

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Spanky

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This could be the dumbest question ever posted on AHB, and if so then I guess that I should be proud. :p

I have a basic lager kit going at the moment and I stirred in the yeast at the start instead of spreading it on top. It has been running quite slow compared to the last kit that I did and the temperature is pretty similar to last time.

Gravity at the start (8 days ago) was 1038. Gravity yesterday was 1010. Bubbling has slowed to more or less the point of stopping.

Have it stuffed up?

Cheers
 

Mikedub

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probably not, give it another week in the fermentor, check reads twice before bottling to ensure its finished, for your next brew I recommend you do a search on this site about rehydrating dry yeast prior to pitching
 

Yob

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^^^...check reading 'to ensure you have reached terminal gravity' before bottling...^^^
 

tiprya

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1.010 is probably done, so no wonder it has slowed down.

I think the advice on the packet is to just sprinkle on the top of the wort. Not sure, I always re-hydrate.
 

tricache

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tiprya said:
1.010 is probably done, so no wonder it has slowed down.

I think the advice on the packet is to just sprinkle on the top of the wort. Not sure, I always re-hydrate.
Different yeasts have different instructions or can be done either way

I did a lager with SAF23 and it had on the pack both ways
 

Bribie G

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The official word from the "Yeast" book is that rehydrating in warm water gently wakes up the yeast and re-forms the cell walls ready for business. Hydrating them in sweet wort can kill a lot of them. However the author is in the business of selling liquid yeast and I know a lot of people take issue with his advice on dry yeasts.

I always rehydrate as an insurance policy, on the odd occasion I use dried.
 

felten

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Bribie G said:
However the author is in the business of selling liquid yeast and I know a lot of people take issue with his advice on dry yeasts.
Dr. Clayton Cone who is in the business of selling dried yeast has said the same thing about rehydrating in wort vs water. Why would anyone take issue on that is beyond me.
 

cremmerson

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How long can you rehydrate yeast for? I tried rehydrating but went too early - ended up waiting five hours for the wort temp to fall from 30C to 22C, returned to see a puddle of yeast at the bottom of a bowl. Sigh.
 

cremmerson

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And I poured it in and stirred, thinking that would introduce more oxygen for happy yeast. Am I right?
 

Yob

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nope..

the dehydrated cell membrane cannot control what passes through the wall like a water rehydrated one can..

after water rehydration? Yep good idea to have a o2 supply to help them reproduce without stress.
 

Hippy

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Bribie G said:
The official word from the "Yeast" book is that rehydrating in warm water gently wakes up the yeast and re-forms the cell walls ready for business. Hydrating them in sweet wort can kill a lot of them. However the author is in the business of selling liquid yeast and I know a lot of people take issue with his advice on dry yeasts.

I always rehydrate as an insurance policy, on the odd occasion I use dried.
Kills to the tune of up to 50% according to the book.
Just reading the book at the moment. Great bit of light reading.
 

seamad

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you don't need to aerate dry yeast and water rehydration is better, from danstar:


Why is rehydrating the dry yeast before pitching important?
Dry beer yeast needs to be reconstituted in a gentle way. During rehydration the cell membrane undergoes changes which can be lethal to yeast. In order to reconstitute the yeast as gently as possible (and minimize/avoid any damage) yeast producers developed specific rehydration procedures. Although most dry beer yeast will work if pitched directly into wort, it is recommended to follow the rehydration instructions to insure the optimum performance of the yeast.


I always aerate my wort when using liquid yeast. Do I need to aerate the wort before pitching dry yeast?
No, there is no need to aerate the wort but it does not harm the yeast either. During its aerobic production, dry yeast accumulates sufficient amounts of unsaturated fatty acids and sterols to produce enough biomass in the first stage of fermentation. The only reason to aerate the wort when using wet yeast is to provide the yeast with oxygen so that it can produce sterols and unsaturated fatty acids which are important parts of the cell membrane and therefore essential for biomass production.
If the slurry from dry yeast fermentation is re-pitched from one batch of beer to another, the wort has to be aerated as with any liquid yeast.
 

Bribie G

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Please nobody mention olive oil :ph34r: :ph34r:
 

mwd

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Would that be normal or extra virgin ? Just add the whole bottle to be sure. :kooi:
 

cremmerson

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Um... Olive oil? Can someone share what they have - no, what they have heard THEIR FRIENDS do with olive oil and brew?
 

Yob

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It provides 'a' source of nutrient but isnt a full diet for them.. If you need more info, the search function is your friend
 

sp0rk

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That being said I have a Pale Ale (with US05) and a London Bitter (with Mangrove Jacks Burton Union) both going gangbusters right now in my ferment fridge, both I think the krausen will spill over and i didn't add olive oil and just sprinkled on top
the last 2 beers i added olive oil (a bee's dick worth on a pin) and they fermented out fully in 5 days
these latest 2 i think will be similar, so my opinion is that it's more down to healthy yeast and good oxygenation than adding the extra foods or whether you've sprinkled or stirred
 

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