Dubbel, Trippel? What's The Difference?

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Bazza

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Hi there,

Are there any experts in Belgian brews who know what the difference is between a dubbel and a trippel? For e.g. - is it strength of ABV or yeast additions (i.e. two or three additions)???

Cheers

Bazza
 

sosman

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Bazza said:
Are there any experts in Belgian brews who know what the difference is between a dubbel and a trippel? For e.g. - is it strength of ABV or yeast additions (i.e. two or three additions)???
[post="73786"][/post]​
I'm no belgian expert but it seems the trippels are higher og but lighter in colour and slightly lighter bodied. You can check out the style descriptions at bjcp.org and presumably aaba.asn.au
 

kook

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In my experience purely colour and the opinion of the brewer.
 

Gulf Brewery

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Bazza said:
Are there any experts in Belgian brews who know what the difference is between a dubbel and a trippel?
Bazza

These are very similar in some ways but very distinct beers in colour and flavours. The best bet for researching about beer styles is to look at the BJCP Site. These guidelines are the basis for a lot of competitions and are good reference source.

Other than that, the next reference is the Classic Beer Styles book on Belgian Ale if you really get hooked on these beers.

Cheers
Pedro
 

Snow

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I think way back in history it all started when the monks brewed a "Single" (or Simple) for everyday drinking to quench the thirst, which was around 5%alc. Then they made a "Double" for special occasions, at anywhere from around 6% to 9%alc. I'm not sure why they called it a double. Then the "tripel" came around (8%-12%alc), which I think was for outside sales only. Classification of the styles by colour is not hard and fast, but generally singles are light/pale, doubles have dark candi sugar and some caramel malts and are usually darker, and tripels are usually light in body and quite pale, with large amounts of light coloured sugar in them to raise the alcohol without increasing mouthfeel. There are always exceptions, though....

Cheers - Snow.
 

barfridge

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Then you throw into the mix the abt (abbot)/quadrupel, which is darker and stronger again, but this one seems to be more a marketing idea than actual brewing.
 

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