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Loose Hull Barley Malt

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freezkat

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I picked up a 48LB sack of Rawson 2Row Barley Malt...

I was reading some of its characteristics:

It has a fat kernel

It has a loose hull.

Recommendation this was a good grain for ethanol but not really for beer.

Why would a loose hull be bad?
 

freezkat

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I picked up a 48LB sack of Rawson 2Row Barley Malt...

I was reading some of its characteristics:

It has a fat kernel

It has a loose hull.

Recommendation this was a good grain for ethanol but not really for beer.

Why would a loose hull be bad?
For sparging reasons would I need some rice hulls or something?
 

vykuza

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I was reading a document last night (about oats, actually) where there was extensive testing on hull on or hull off during the malting process. There was a significant difference in the enzymes available in the malt between the two states. It might be your malt has been malted with a "loose hull", and thus encouraging a different set of enzymes to be present in the end product?

I don't know for sure, it's just me applying a small amount of half-remembered knowledge, but it's also the only thing I can think of.

Get brewing and let us know!
 

freezkat

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I was reading a document last night (about oats, actually) where there was extensive testing on hull on or hull off during the malting process. There was a significant difference in the enzymes available in the malt between the two states. It might be your malt has been malted with a "loose hull", and thus encouraging a different set of enzymes to be present in the end product?

I don't know for sure, it's just me applying a small amount of half-remembered knowledge, but it's also the only thing I can think of.

Get brewing and let us know!
I thought that what was good for whiskey/scotch was also good for beer. The fat hull indicates more available starch. I have also have read that those "-ase" enzymes live in the hull. Maybe this is just going to be cloudy.

Chewing the grain tells me it is tough and

I am not a mash master. I would implore for some direction on small batch experimenting
 

freezkat

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I thought that what was good for whiskey/scotch was also good for beer. The fat hull indicates more available starch. I have also have read that those "-ase" enzymes live in the hull. Maybe this is just going to be cloudy.

Chewing the grain tells me it is tough and

I am not a mash master. I would implore for some direction on small batch experimenting
This is a shameless bump. I came up with another question.

What about rolled barley? Like hot steel rolled oats, does it need to be mashed with base malt?
 

vykuza

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Yes, unless it's specifically marketed as malted, then you'll need to mash it with a diastatic malt to get it to convert.
 

freezkat

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Yes, unless it's specifically marketed as malted, then you'll need to mash it with a diastatic malt to get it to convert.
I was thinking the hull broke loose during malting. The leaflet I read said this malt was better for distilling than making beer. Um....isn't that where scotch whiskey comes from...making beer?

All the ***ase enzymes are in the hull. Or am I wrong? Is this a better candidate for a corona grind mill vs. a crush type mill then?
 

vykuza

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If it doesn't have a hull on it (like malted wheat) then you'll need to throw some rice hulls in with your mash or it wont lauter in any reasonable time frame.

Apart from that, I would "suck it and see". Make a beer and tell us what it tastes like. FOR SCIENCE!
 

freezkat

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If it doesn't have a hull on it (like malted wheat) then you'll need to throw some rice hulls in with your mash or it wont lauter in any reasonable time frame.

Apart from that, I would "suck it and see". Make a beer and tell us what it tastes like. FOR SCIENCE!
Well if its in the name of science...I'll take one for all of humanity...

right after I get some rice hulls.
 

freezkat

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Well if its in the name of science...I'll take one for all of humanity...

right after I get some rice hulls.
I did a 2 Kilo experiment.

I only detected a hint of wort by smelling. Doing BIAB I made the creamiest slipperiest liquid.

I did a starch test dipping a paper towel (which I suppose was wrong) and dripped on a drop of tincture of iodine. Pure Black... after 90 mash. I notice the white goo dried up and made a nice flake...like pure starch.

I am amazing at making starch.

I cancelled sparging and just put the running in a small bucket and threw in some bread yeast when at 28C. I gave it a smell 2 days later and it smells like I'm making a sour-dough
 

MHB

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Having read quite a few of your creative ideas about brewing can I suggest you spend some time reading How to Brew the online version is free, when you have some idea of what you want to make and how to brew, go and buy real beer making ingredients and make a real beer.
No animal food barley, no bags of cheap as shit unmalted malt, no squashing it with road building equipment just some Malt, hops and a bit of good yeast.
Simple really
Mark
 

freezkat

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Having read quite a few of your creative ideas about brewing can I suggest you spend some time reading "How to Brew" the online version is free, when you have some idea of what you want to make and how to brew, go and buy real beer making ingredients and make a real beer.
No animal food barley, no bags of cheap as shit unmalted malt, no squashing it with road building equipment – just some Malt, hops and a bit of good yeast.
Simple really
Mark
I understand your retail point of view. I don't have a home brew shop nearby. I am not exactly rich. After taxes. I make $225 week. Health insurance comes out of that $225. I live in a farm community. Grain comes from farms. Maybe I'm just trying what is available to me in my town instead of driving 2 hours to get as you say "real" ingredients. I don't have the money for a MLT, and a 50L false bottom pot.

I'm glad you find my fumbling entertaining. I'm not trying to run you out of business. The commute to your store would be even more taxing. Do you have friendlier more patient people at your counter or is it just you? Do you make the same judgements as soon as they leave. "What a bloomin' idiot...did yeh git what thet bum was trahying tah doo?"

I'm having fun. You are right, I don't know what I'm doing. I'm not hurting anybody in the process. I have wasted $28 on "bird-feed". My local seed supplier appreciated my business. I can plant the rest and feed even more wildlife. It could grind into flour too. So... not a total waste. I will bring some of this "feed" to somebody who does know what they are doing. Cereal mash?...I don't know...I will find out.

I have a video on 3 vessel brewing. It has nothing to do with what I was trying to pull off.
 

QldKev

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Jumping into the middle of this, I think it is great to break out from the mold of 'how we brew', wherever its for the fun of experiments or the savings aspect. Ideas such as BIAB would have never developed without it.

I think the reference to read 'how to brew' was more because you missed a completely basic concept in brewing. Barley needs to be malted before it can be mashed. In this case if you wanted to use un-malted base barley, you need to malt it yourself. I have seen a few posts over the years where people have done that, malted and then dried in an old clothes drier was a great one, they detailed their malting process and also the way they regulated the drier temps and finally a filter they setup to separate the malt from the roots. They even finished off with a description on how they toasted the grain to a level (different times and temperatures) to suit the target recipe, including based malts and a crystal type. After doing all of this yourself, you allow that what you produce will only be as good as the barley you selected upfront, and won't have the same control the malt houses do.

Mark may own a brew shop, but I think he generally supports well thought out experiments. In a recent thread on heating elements, I found one that he doesn't stock that looked a good value for money product. He didn't knock my idea, he purchased one for himself to do some parallel experiments.


QldKev
 

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