Electric brewery options

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djackal

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Hi guys, I'm switching from gas to electric but have been turning myself into knots for the past month not knowing what options to take.
I was originally thinking of an all in one (robobrew 65) or guten. But I've also been considering something like cheeky peak. I can reuse a lot of existing gear like pumps and fittings plus use my gas burner on large batches if I need. Only problem is that I want something with a larger element and a semi decent controller (getting 2x15amps installed next Friday). Are there any options here like electric brewery in the states with units ready made? Or if I want a larger unit do I need to go all in one and accept the limitations and potential issues that come with that set up?
 

akx

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I have a robobrew 65. It feels slower than my old gas set-up, but I can walk away and not worry about anything burning. I've been using my old mash tun and hot liquor tank (round eskies) to increase the volume / gravity I can get on my brew day, so I can still get (+/-) 45l of 1.070 wort. For me the convenience of a plug and play unit was worth the sacrifice of the limited heating capacity.
 

djackal

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I have an esky mash tun, electric hlt and tons of silicon tubes, cam lock fittings and 2 pumps so could do something similar. Plus instant hot water so the only thing slow would be getting to a boil (would a herms or rims set up in line speed that up perhaps)? I just hear about things getting stuck and issues about quality of workmanship. If these are over blown then robo 65 moves up the preference list.?
 

Tubbsy9876

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I've got the Cheaky Peak BIA Basket system. I mash and boil all in one with recirc and an Inkbird.

I've been really happy, but I like to manually control a lot of things, rather than a set and forget style.
 

djackal

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I've got the Cheaky Peak BIA Basket system. I mash and boil all in one with recirc and an Inkbird.

I've been really happy, but I like to manually control a lot of things, rather than a set and forget style.
Is it with the standard 2200w element? Or is it a larger one that requires a 15amp outlet and circuit? This is the issue that I'm trying to resolve.
 

blacktop™

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I’ve made a few PID/pump panels for home brewers, home brew stores and micro breweries. Hit me up if you’d like a quote :)
 

Grmblz

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Whatever you go with just make sure the elements are ULWD (ultra low watt density) or you WILL get scorching, amps isn't everything. Elements and controllers take a look, usual caveat, if you don't know what you're doing employ someone that does. No affiliation etc, etc. Claims from all in one (robo/guten, whatever) about ULWD elements should be taken with a pinch of sodium chloride.
 

Heath72

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This is my Cheeky Peak 50l BIAB system. 3600w element. 240 amp Controller came from the US, with PID, element power control, mash to boil switch and pump switch. Wired into a 32amp single phase outlet.
 

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blacktop™

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This is my Cheeky Peak 50l BIAB system. 3600w element. 240 amp Controller came from the US, with PID, element power control, mash to boil switch and pump switch. Wired into a 32amp single phase outlet.

That looks like a nice setup. Do you have any more info on the controller?
 

Tubbsy9876

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Is it with the standard 2200w element? Or is it a larger one that requires a 15amp outlet and circuit? This is the issue that I'm trying to resolve.
Its just the 2200W element. Haven't had any dramas getting it up to temperature, and with recirculation it holds mash temperature pretty well.

If you were getting excessive heating loss, they make a jacket for it. But I do 5 gallon batches, so I'm not often heating more than 28-30L. Only time I have is when I did a RIS, needed to split the grain bill in two then combine and boil it down for a few hours. But lecky is super cheap.
 

hairydog

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Is it with the standard 2200w element? Or is it a larger one that requires a 15amp outlet and circuit? This is the issue that I'm trying to resolve.
If the element is larger than 2400W = 10Amps you will need a 15amp dedicated circuit.
 

TONY VAN DER ZANDEN

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Hi guys, I'm switching from gas to electric but have been turning myself into knots for the past month not knowing what options to take.
I was originally thinking of an all in one (robobrew 65) or guten. But I've also been considering something like cheeky peak. I can reuse a lot of existing gear like pumps and fittings plus use my gas burner on large batches if I need. Only problem is that I want something with a larger element and a semi decent controller (getting 2x15amps installed next Friday). Are there any options here like electric brewery in the states with units ready made? Or if I want a larger unit do I need to go all in one and accept the limitations and potential issues that come with that set up?
I had A robobrew 35, was so impressed with that, up graded to the brewzilla 65. Easy to operate, I do have 15amps to the shed.
 

TheAussieBrewer

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I highly recomend a Cheeky Peak Nano system, by far the most reliable and you can upgrade and adapt everything.
 

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djackal

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Some sweet set-ups here. Who knew setting up an electric brewery required so much planning and consideration...actually probably just me over thinking things as usual rather than just making a decision and stumping up the cash!
 

Grok

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You also want to consider how much wattage you can actually draw! As I'm finding out with a converted fully loaded 60L digiboil kettle, it struggles to get to boil and maintain a decent boil, even with a jacket on it. There are a few reasons for this,
  1. The measured resistance values @240v of the digiboil and subsequent calculations of current draw are a little under spec and,
  2. The actual supply voltage at the kettle in my setup drops down to around 220~233v under load, this means the current also takes a hit and you don't get the wattage you think you have available, and you do really need all the wattage you can get when its full.
Just my real world observations! I am intending to get dedicated individual (2or3) phases straight from the fuse box installed in the near future to get decent sustained voltage and of course current to go with it.
 
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djebel

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The nominal supply voltage for Australia (excluding WA) is 230V, -6% + 10% (so 216V - 253V).


We still call it 240V because most people don't know about the change. And because it's what we've always called it.
 

Grok

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Well, that kinda reinforces my point.
Here's my logic:
My digiboil heater elements combined total (all 3 elements joined and measured as 1) is 17.2 ohms.
Applying Ohms law formula: Volts squared/Resistance = P(watts)
  • (220x220)/17.2 = 2814 watts
  • (230x230)/17.2 = 3075 watts
  • (240x240)/17.2 = 3349 watts
  • (246x246)/17.2 = 3518 watts
Now if your available power is around 220~230v, then it will struggle to get to, and maintain a fully loaded digiboil/brewzilla of 50~60L.
IMO, its a bit of a fudge to say you've got 3500 watt of power, especially if your power supply is around 230v, unless you have about a 246v constant supply, then you will not get the heating capacity you paid for!*
*Of course the outcome depends on your individual R value of the elements in your vessel.
 
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CaptainMachSnot

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Well, that kinda reinforces my point.
Here's my logic:
My digiboil heater elements combined total (all 3 elements joined and measured as 1) is 17.2 ohms.
Applying Ohms law formula: Volts squared/Resistance = P(watts)
  • (220x220)/17.2 = 2814 watts
  • (230x230)/17.2 = 3075 watts
  • (240x240)/17.2 = 3349 watts
  • (246x246)/17.2 = 3518 watts
Now if your available power is around 220~230v, then it will struggle to get to, and maintain a fully loaded digiboil/brewzilla of 50~60L.
IMO, its a bit of a fudge to say you've got 3500 watt of power, especially if your power supply is around 230v, unless you have about a 246v constant supply, then you will not get the heating capacity you paid for!*
*Of course the outcome depends on your individual R value of the elements in your vessel.
And don't forget the allowable 5% voltage drop from the point of supply (AS3000 clause 3.6.2)
 

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