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Diacetyl Rest For Us-05

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gazeboar

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Have a question, i'm brewing an ale at 18 degrees, and i'm just about to lower my ale temp down for a diacetyl rest (I used US-05 and Fermentis recommends lowering by two to three degrees for 48 hours or so), so it'll be around 15 degrees. I just read the temp at which i'll be conditioning, and it's 26 degrees in my cupboard. Is transfering the liquid from 15 degrees to an ambient temp of 26 going to have any affect or impart any odd flavours or will warmer temps only speed up the process of carbonation? Only reason I ask is because i've heard two things - 1. Ale conditioning is best done at fermentation temperatures and warmer conditioning temps should be avoided, and 2 - Conditioning is fine at room temp (in my case on the warmer side). 26 degrees is as cool as I can condition. I'm probably being paranoid about nothing but thought I would check.
 

Steve@PMF82

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I think you will find you need to RAISE your ferment temp a few degrees for D rest, helps keep the yeast more active to clean up the D.

Cupboard temp will be fine for your bottle conditioning.
 

manticle

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Not a big issue in terms of the shift from 15-26. While carbonating too, if the temp gets a bit hotter it won't have a huge impact (except as you guess, it will happen a bit faster). Stuff almost definitely will be occurring on a molecular level but taste difference etc, it shouldn't be a worry.

Storage of your beer is another issue - chemical reaction speeds are correlated with temperature. The general rule of thumb (and it's really general because all sorts of different conditions are required to catalyse all sorts of reactions) is that for each 10 degree shift upwards, reactions will occur twice as quickly. This includes staling and oxidation of beer so hot weather and storage of beer are not friends. I'm not sold on that rule of thumb personally but it is true that heat will accelerate some chemical reactions, including some that make beer taste funny.

In my experience, some beer can cope better than others but once carbed they are best off stored cool or cold. A lot of people, including myself don't have cool storage so take the risk.

@beer4u - that's what I thought too but the fermentis PDF does indeed suggest lowering ale temps down to about 15-16 deg for diacetyl rest.
 

gazeboar

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I think you will find you need to RAISE your ferment temp a few degrees for D rest, helps keep the yeast more active to clean up the D.

Cupboard temp will be fine for your bottle conditioning.

This is exactly what I thought, but according to Fermentis, lager temps should be raised, and ales fermenting at 20 or so should be decreased to 16-17. They paired this with 'Low temperature is to be used at the end of the fermentation to achieve good flocculation.' So i'm guessing raising temps doesn't help much with reducing yeast suspension seeing as though ales are top fermenting? Or at least a longer rest is required. Again, i'm new to all this, maybe someone can elaborate. This was the info around page 6: www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/Tips-Tricks.

Thanks Manticle, you're a great help. :icon_cheers:

http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/Tips-Tricks.
 

Steve@PMF82

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@beer4u - that's what I thought too but the fermentis PDF does indeed suggest lowering ale temps down to about 15-16 deg for diacetyl rest.
Yes so it does - i stand corrected, i would be interested to see their facts and figures on this?

I can only theorize but does taking the yeast to the very bottom of its temp range make it go into panic mode and quickly clean up and store energy for later on?
 

brucearnold

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The PDF won't open for me and I can't find the doc on their website but as gazeboar quoted from the doc "Low temp is to be used athe end of the form to achieve good floc". This sounds more like CC than D rest.
 

parrja

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I put .pdf on the end of the link and it worked for me. Interesting enough reading.
 

Steve@PMF82

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Yeah it really goes against everything i have ever read or been told. US-05 is known for its fairly poor flocculation, which results in the yeast dropping slower. You want yeast kept in suspension at the end of fermentation to clean up.
I can only gather that they rely on the yeasts poor flocking and reluctance to drop out of suspension lets you get away with lowering the temp.
But if you were brewing a faux lager type ale at 15 - 16 degrees you may have had a slow start to the ferment at these temps and you would definitely want the temp to rise a few degrees at the end to help keep the yeast active.

I always let all my ales rise a couple of degrees at or near the end of fermentation then leave them a few days to a week before dropping the temps for ccing, often the beer clears on its own at ferment temps.

Here is some further reading from the Blue Book on yeast from the IBD.

"The reduction of vicinal diketones in the later stages of fermentation and during maturation
requires the presence of adequate yeast in suspension in the fermented wort. Thus, where
the yeast is particularly flocculent (this phenomenon will be discussed later), premature
separation will be reflected by low rates of diacetyl reduction and potentially elevated
levels in finished beer. Diacetyl removal is also affected by the physiological condition of
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the yeast. When the pitching yeast is in poor condition, such that the primary fermentation
performance is suboptimal, the yeast present during the latter stages will be stressed and
the period of diacetyl reduction will be prolonged.
A number of strategies can be adopted to ensure that beer diacetyl specifications arc
achieved. Diacetyl removal can be attained post-fermentation in the conditioning stages of
brewing (traditional lagering). This is a slow process, expensive in terms of time and
conditioning capacity. Alternatively, it is desirable to ensure that minimum diacetyl
concentrations are achieved before the beer is removed from the fermenter. It is necessary
to select fermentation conditions (i.e. pitching rate, wort DO and attemperation regimes)
which provide an optimum profile. In practice, the aim is to promote the maximum aacetolactate
levels as early as possible, such that the resultant diacetyl may be rapidly
reduced due to the presence of a high suspended yeast count. This reductive phase may be
stimulated by increasing the fermentation temperature approximately two-thirds through
the fermentation cycle. "
 

brucearnold

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I am leaning towards that table in fermentis to be incorrect as it goes against what is written on the other pages (10 in particular) and in all other pieces of documentation I have read ( thanks Don). Logically, how can cooling the yeast envigerate it to consume diacetyl?
 

gazeboar

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The PDF won't open for me and I can't find the doc on their website but as gazeboar quoted from the doc "Low temp is to be used athe end of the form to achieve good floc". This sounds more like CC than D rest.

Apologies guys, the link was missing .pdf at the end as mentioned. This is the link: http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/Tips-Tricks.pdf.

There's some great information on there, I used the fermentation notes pages also as I didn't have a formalised logbook for keeping track of brewing data. Think i'll still chill down to help flocculate as suggested.
 

brucearnold

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Apologies guys, the link was missing .pdf at the end as mentioned. This is the link: http://www.fermentis.com/fo/pdf/Tips-Tricks.pdf.

There's some great information on there, I used the fermentation notes pages also as I didn't have a formalised logbook for keeping track of brewing data. Think i'll still chill down to help flocculate as suggested.
IMHO I would pay attention to Chris White and hold the temp for a couple of days once reaching terminal gravity. Don't reduce the temp for an ale as I don't think anybody here on the forum would do that other than CCing at the end of the rest.
 

manticle

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Might be worth an email to fermentis for clarification. Their info is usually pretty thorough and detailed but that goes against what I have read and experienced. Normally a week at ferment temp for ales is enough to remove acetaldehyde and diacetyl.
 

gazeboar

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Might be worth an email to fermentis for clarification. Their info is usually pretty thorough and detailed but that goes against what I have read and experienced. Normally a week at ferment temp for ales is enough to remove acetaldehyde and diacetyl.
I'll go with common opinion on this one then. I won't be bothering with CCing. So another week in the fermenter fridge at 18 degrees after the FG is steady is ideal? Does it need to be a week or can it be a few days? It's doing my head in all these conflicting ideas. Not particularly from this forum, just various other sources. I've heard that ales must be bottled immediately after fermentation has finished. Is this inaccurate?
 

brucearnold

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I'll go with common opinion on this one then. I won't be bothering with CCing. So another week in the fermenter fridge at 18 degrees after the FG is steady is ideal? Does it need to be a week or can it be a few days? It's doing my head in all these conflicting ideas. Not particularly from this forum, just various other sources. I've heard that ales must be bottled immediately after fermentation has finished. Is this inaccurate?
I am not saying it is correct, but I normally rest for at least 2 days then chill to drop out spent yeast. If bottling i still have enough yeast in suspension for carbonation.
 

gazeboar

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I am not saying it is correct, but I normally rest for at least 2 days then chill to drop out spent yeast. If bottling i still have enough yeast in suspension for carbonation.
Well, everyone has different methods. At the end of the day it's whatever is preferred and produces good results I suppose. How long do you chill for and at what temperature for ales? I did notice there was a huge amount of yeast in suspension of my brew. Took out a small sample, it's only day 8 and the air lock is still bubbling so it isn't finished yet. I just wanted some opinions and wanted to be prepared for when the gravity is stable.
:icon_cheers:
 

manticle

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I'll go with common opinion on this one then. I won't be bothering with CCing.
CCing is great. I recommend it highly

So another week in the fermenter fridge at 18 degrees after the FG is steady is ideal? Does it need to be a week or can it be a few days?
Few days is better than no days. Taste the beer - if you get green apple or butter/butterscotch, give it longer. If you don't then bottle away happily. Time also allows yeast and shit you don't want in the beer to drop out. Even if it drops out in the bottle, it's still in the bottle. If you leave it behind in the fermenter, it's goodbye shit I don't want in my beer.

It's doing my head in all these conflicting ideas. Not particularly from this forum, just various other sources. I've heard that ales must be bottled immediately after fermentation has finished. Is this inaccurate?
Yes it's inaccurate.

Basically yeast produce co2 and alcohol as byproducts from them digesting sugars. They do this fairly messily though and fart like teenage boys on a dim sim scoff-a-thon. Give the room time to clear and it's OK to go in there again without gagging for breath.

Alternatively, if you've ever worked in a busy kitchen, think of getting slammed during service. Things get done, mess is left behind. Prep needs to be done, kitchen cleaned, drinks all around (and cigarettes and chasing waitresses and coke and.............)
 

gazeboar

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Haha... hilarious analogy Manticle. I get it though, a few days D-rest can't hurt. This is the first chance I could do cold conditioning but didn't think it was neccesary as i've never really had any issues with clarity or excess sediment at the bottle of my bottles. Never really used gelatine or Irish Moss either. I might just do it anyway, I want this batch to be as good as possible.
Thanks for the input fellow brewers.
 

manticle

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I don't use gelatine any more either but I find 3-7 days cc (I usually do a week) makes a massive difference to the end product. Bottled beer will get there without but it takes longer. Times when I've tried to rush it, I've regretted.
 

gazeboar

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I don't use gelatine any more either but I find 3-7 days cc (I usually do a week) makes a massive difference to the end product. Bottled beer will get there without but it takes longer. Times when I've tried to rush it, I've regretted.
At what temperature for an ale do you CC? Around 15 as suggested with the Fermentis pdf?
 

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