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Coopers To Release A All-malt Kit - No Sugar Needed

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t_c

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Coopers purchases 'Mr Beer' in America and to release a all-malt extract that does not require sugar plus more yeast.


"We will replace the current malt extracts with a superior quality all-malt concentrate produced at Coopers with a yeast specifically designed for their size kit," he said.

"This will remove the need for a sugar adjunct and will significantly improve the quality of beer that is produced."


now wtf cant they release that here in Australia.... maybe a AHB group email is in order?


linky
http://finance.ninemsn.com.au/newsbusiness...ps-into-mr-beer
 

bignath

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probably because if they start producing a kit (with instructions) that produce a REALLY REALLY good beer, then the risk is we'll stop buying their commercial product.

I have no evidence of it, but i'm sure the shit instructions on the current home brew tins from them (ie: ferment at "way too high temp") etc...is designed to fail, so we all go back to buying their beer.

There's no way on earth, that coopers would believe that quality beer is made with that yeast at that temp.

Conspiracy i reckon. Right up there with Bigfoot, Lochness Monster, and the Titanic.

FWIW, i love coopers beers (in general) particularly the pale and sparkling ales. Actually the mild is a good session beer when you're behind the wheel, but don't want to sit at the party with only a couple of beers for the whole afternoon.
 

manticle

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probably because if they start producing a kit (with instructions) that produce a REALLY REALLY good beer, then the risk is we'll stop buying their commercial product.

I have no evidence of it, but i'm sure the shit instructions on the current home brew tins from them (ie: ferment at "way too high temp") etc...is designed to fail, so we all go back to buying their beer.

There's no way on earth, that coopers would believe that quality beer is made with that yeast at that temp.

Conspiracy i reckon. Right up there with Bigfoot, Lochness Monster, and the Titanic.

FWIW, i love coopers beers (in general) particularly the pale and sparkling ales. Actually the mild is a good session beer when you're behind the wheel, but don't want to sit at the party with only a couple of beers for the whole afternoon.
I doubt that massively Nath. I think coopers are pretty supportive of HB in general and if they wanted us only to have the option of buying their beers, then that is all they would sell. HB is probably 0.25% of their market anyway.

I think the shit instructions are to stop people from getting too confused.
Ferment between 20 and 27 gives people an easily obtainable range and they can make beer in 3 days. Tell them to ferment between a 2 degree range, start getting involved in the difference between lager and ale yeast, telling them to condition a beer on the yeast for a further week etc = too hard basket.

I reckon that's the same reason they tell people to roll the bottled stuff as trying to explain how to treat and decant a bottle conditioned beer will just be met with 'huh?"
 

Charst

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Coopers purchases 'Mr Beer' in America and to release a all-malt extract that does not require sugar plus more yeast.


"We will replace the current malt extracts with a superior quality all-malt concentrate produced at Coopers with a yeast specifically designed for their size kit," he said.

"This will remove the need for a sugar adjunct and will significantly improve the quality of beer that is produced."


now wtf cant they release that here in Australia.... maybe a AHB group email is in order?


linky
http://finance.ninemsn.com.au/newsbusiness...ps-into-mr-beer
Mr Beer kits only make 8 Litre batches, so making the tinned extract with just less bitterness resulting in an all malt 8 litres is easily done. I suppose they could make say 3kg cans to enable brewers to make an all malt 23 litres, but then again you can just buy a tin of the unhopped extract to go with your hopped one.
 

Lodan

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Good on Coopers for expanding their business. Nice to see an Aussie owned company doing well
 

davidpr

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I think the shit instructions are to stop people from getting too confused.
Ferment between 20 and 27 gives people an easily obtainable range and they can make beer in 3 days. Tell them to ferment between a 2 degree range, start getting involved in the difference between lager and ale yeast, telling them to condition a beer on the yeast for a further week etc = too hard basket.
Do you really think it would confuse anyone to say "ferment between 18 and 27 degrees (closer to the bottom of this range will make a nicer tasting beer)" or "optionally, bottle a week after FG is achieved for a better tasting brew".

If this confuses anyone, they probably shouldn't be drinking beer, they should be keeping their head as clear as possible.
 

manticle

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Yes I do. Take a look at some of the noob questions that often get asked here and imagine that for everyone of those intetested in craft brewing, there are 17 others interested in quick, cheap piss.

It's at least as rrasonable an assumption as a commercial plot to steer people away from hb.
 

davidpr

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Maybe you're right Manticle, and you're definitely right about that being at least as reasonable as the conspiracy theory.

I suppose the point is, ultimately, it really doesn't matter. Those interested in making good beer are going to research beyond the little pamphlet. Those who don't care get a recipe for easy, fast, cheap piss. Everyone's a winner! Now that's sorted, let's have a home brew.
 

Pat Casey

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1. Coopers already do all malt kits, sort of. Their "Thomas Coopers Premium" range call for 1.5 kg can of Coopers liquid malt extract. There are four in the range: Aus Bitter, Traditional Draught, Heritage Lager, and Sparkling Ale. Available in HBSs only.

2. Given Cooper's small share of the beer market, it doesn't matter whether they sell beer or home brew kits it's business going to Coopers rather than CUB or Lion Nathan. Given that two of the Coopers kits emulate their comercial beers, Sparkling and Pale ales, Coopers probably figure that homebrew kit sales help their beer sales over the medium to longer term.

3. The kindest thing you can say about manufacturers' kit instructions is they are failsafe instructions. The big problem is the overly warm fermentation temperatures. This is partly because the products are sold throughout the country for the full year. Stipulating a 20 degree fermentation temperature would work. They also don't want to make it seem too hard.

The other reason they recommend an overly warm fermentation temperature is to get a quick start to fermentation. This reduces the chances of people deciding that something must be wrong after nothing happening for a few hours, and then fiddling with the brew and exposing it to possible infections.

The shame is when sensible people follow the instructions and get an inferior beer. It would be nice for local manufacturers to supply sensible and well as idiot instructions. Muntons (UK) do this.

Pat
 

Liam_snorkel

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I doubt that massively Nath. I think coopers are pretty supportive of HB in general and if they wanted us only to have the option of buying their beers, then that is all they would sell. HB is probably 0.25% of their market anyway.
You got me wondering about how much coopers actually make off home brew. According to this article, Coopers "has total annual revenue of about $200 million, of which $30 million comes from its home-brewing business."
If I did my sums right that's 15%, nothing to be sniffed at. This could be a pretty smart business decision by Coopers.
 

kelbygreen

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I think MHB had coopers yeast for sale.

I think it should be more upto the LHBS to tell people about the right temps and better ways to brew. I know this is not the case with alot of brew shops that want to sell gear no matter what the out comes are. I got my starter kit from a place that when I asked can I brew in this weather (36-40c days) it will be in my shed they said yes thats fine it will just ferment faster. Now if they said well its best kept between 18-22c then I would of searched for ways to cool it. But I guess some of people would just go OH OK! well I will come back when its 20deg and buy it then.
 

kelbygreen

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I dont think there is anything wrong with the yeast apart from underpitching and being stored under the lid at what ever temp. It has to be a very hardy yeast to withstand such treatment and if you used it at the right pitching rates and temps I think you might be surprised how it turns out
 

Batz

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1. Coopers already do all malt kits, sort of. Their "Thomas Coopers Premium" range call for 1.5 kg can of Coopers liquid malt extract. There are four in the range: Aus Bitter, Traditional Draught, Heritage Lager, and Sparkling Ale. Available in HBSs only.

2. Given Cooper's small share of the beer market, it doesn't matter whether they sell beer or home brew kits it's business going to Coopers rather than CUB or Lion Nathan. Given that two of the Coopers kits emulate their comercial beers, Sparkling and Pale ales, Coopers probably figure that homebrew kit sales help their beer sales over the medium to longer term.

3. The kindest thing you can say about manufacturers' kit instructions is they are failsafe instructions. The big problem is the overly warm fermentation temperatures. This is partly because the products are sold throughout the country for the full year. Stipulating a 20 degree fermentation temperature would work. They also don't want to make it seem too hard.

The other reason they recommend an overly warm fermentation temperature is to get a quick start to fermentation. This reduces the chances of people deciding that something must be wrong after nothing happening for a few hours, and then fiddling with the brew and exposing it to possible infections.

The shame is when sensible people follow the instructions and get an inferior beer. It would be nice for local manufacturers to supply sensible and well as idiot instructions. Muntons (UK) do this.

Pat

He says it all right there. +1

batz
 

manticle

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You got me wondering about how much coopers actually make off home brew. According to this article, Coopers "has total annual revenue of about $200 million, of which $30 million comes from its home-brewing business."
If I did my sums right that's 15%, nothing to be sniffed at. This could be a pretty smart business decision by Coopers.
In that case, it's in their best interest to sell it.
Either way, conspiracy theory no sense the make.

Ask them why they include shit instructions with their kits. I'm hypothesising but essentially I think it's for ease of use.

Email them. They are responsive to emails in my experience.
 

Nick JD

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Kit instructions are there so people will buy kits. Not much point selling something where the user can't use it because the instructions say, "Maintain fermentation at 18C + or - 0.5C".

And as if it only tastes bad because of the fermentation temp; it's pretty average beer when made perfectly.
 

hoppy2B

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I've just been wondering about the whole production side of malt extract. When one reads about the heating of wort and the blowing of air through the system to facilitate evaporation and so on. Wouldn't that just lead to overwhelming amounts of oxidation? :unsure:
 

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