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markau

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So our first brew is in the carboy now - a Cooper's European Lager kit. We chose that kit for the lager yeast in these wintery Adelaide conditions, and fermentation has stayed steady at 14-16 degrees just sitting in our spare room (the kit suggests 21 degrees, down to 13). Although we did our homework, we got a bit lucky there.

For our next batch, especially if we try a partial, it seems there are really only a couple of options - either try to manage the fermentation temperature, or choose a yeast that works in the current conditions.

I notice that most lager yeast requires temperatures of 8-14 - colder than we have at the moment (although probably good for the dead of winter next year). I then noticed Californian Lager yeast, which requires 14-20. This seems perfect for now, and the next few months, as we come into spring.

Am I giving myself the best chance of success, and the least hassles, by just choosing that yeast and finding a recipe that uses it? The idea of seasonal brewing, like fruit and vegetables, is OK to me (as much as I'd love to put a wheat beer on next...).

Is this what you guys do? It seems easier than trying to chill/heat the carboy, but I might be missing something...!

(Is summer more of a problem? There might be wider temperature ranges to deal with...)

Sorry if this post contains about 20 questions - the more I learn the more I realise I don't know.... but that's like anything I suppose!
 

thebeemann

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So our first brew is in the carboy now - a Cooper's European Lager kit. We chose that kit for the lager yeast in these wintery Adelaide conditions, and fermentation has stayed steady at 14-16 degrees just sitting in our spare room (the kit suggests 21 degrees, down to 13). Although we did our homework, we got a bit lucky there.

For our next batch, especially if we try a partial, it seems there are really only a couple of options - either try to manage the fermentation temperature, or choose a yeast that works in the current conditions.

I notice that most lager yeast requires temperatures of 8-14 - colder than we have at the moment (although probably good for the dead of winter next year). I then noticed Californian Lager yeast, which requires 14-20. This seems perfect for now, and the next few months, as we come into spring.

Am I giving myself the best chance of success, and the least hassles, by just choosing that yeast and finding a recipe that uses it? The idea of seasonal brewing, like fruit and vegetables, is OK to me (as much as I'd love to put a wheat beer on next...).

Is this what you guys do? It seems easier than trying to chill/heat the carboy, but I might be missing something...!

(Is summer more of a problem? There might be wider temperature ranges to deal with...)

Sorry if this post contains about 20 questions - the more I learn the more I realise I don't know.... but that's like anything I suppose!
Get an old fridge and a stc1000 temp sensor off ebay = brew what you want when you want , ur idea works at the moment but in a couple of months it will be 2 hot , also its not just the max temp, you need a consistant temp not jumping around ie 5c at night then 16c during the day... i started out only brewing in winter now even my winter brews taste 100 % better using the fridge.
 

Clutch

Brew your own beer, you'll save money.
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Basing your brews on season is what you should do, at least until you get temp control.
 

markau

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Thanks fellas, it sounds like temperature control is inevitable...
 

Tex083

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I just brew the seasons, if your bottle conditioning as I am because I cant afford a keg system the brew benifits from some time in the cellar.
I have just fininshed a Koelsch - good 1st all grain brew, cant wait till it heats up then drink it.
When were in the heat of summer I tend to brew dark beers for the winter. Its only a problem if your mates come over and drink all your beer supplies.

I do use a heat pad in winter sometimes to regulate temp. I have the heat pad controled by a STC1000 http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/AC-220V-All-pur...=item4ab28702fe

Easy to wire up if you are careful, good luck with the brewing
 

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