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4wd Air Compressor

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pk.sax

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Looking for one to fit under the hood. Anyone got any suggestions about a decent one?

Comparing specs on stuff on eBay to one on Suprcheap Auto website, the supercheap auto ones seem a little weak?!

ebay:

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Brand-New-150L-...#ht_3276wt_1139

@ comparable prices, why should I not take one off ebay instead? I haven't used one before.
 

drew9242

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I would recommend the arb pump. You get a wiring kit so the switch is in the car. They are strong and fast. They will cost you more but all the cheap versions die after a couple of uses. And it sucks when you need to pump you're tyres up and the pump dies.
 

pk.sax

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Hmmm. Looked at the supercheap auto stuff in the shop. They 'look' flimsy compared to those smexy web ones you suggest. This is gonna cost me money! lol. The cheapest arb one I seem to be able to get is still around 180 off eBay. Will have to check their store, not holding too much hope though. Still, if it lasts like it should... Also, they (Internet websites) keep recommending using a tank with the compressor. I get their logic of moisture protection, yada yada. But what is the reality? Anyone have experience with these?

I can find just enough space for a small compressor under the hood. If it is a tank too, then I'm going to have to installedw under the chassis. Dunno if that is good or bad!
Installing on a jk wrangler.
 

drew9242

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The arb pump I got has a small tank beside it, with a pressure switch. So it will cut out when full and not keep on running when changing tyres. They are small so easy to fit under bonnet. The question is do you want spend all this time install a cheap pump that will probably shit itself in 4 uses. Then you have to change it again. I can take a photo of mine tomorrow if ya need.
 

pk.sax

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Mate, that would be sweet if you do.

I am having trouble visualising a tank going under my bonnet, they really don't leave much space in there... I can see a good spot between the drive shaft and exhaust manifold that might be the go rather, will have to wait and see.
I don't know what the deal would be with moving stuff around in there, am handy enough but no motor mechanic by a long shot. Any pictures welcome :)
 

newguy

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I can see a good spot between the drive shaft and exhaust manifold that might be the go rather, will have to wait and see.
An old client of mine runs a small business (it's mainly a hobby for them) making extreme 4x4 trucks - the kind that you see in rock crawling competitions. Their trucks run custom pneumatic suspension systems and they had me build a custom joystick control and display unit for them. I could ask them what type of compressor they're using if you'd like. But, relating to the sentence above, I'm pretty sure that they went to lengths to isolate theirs from the exhaust manifold as the heat will kill a compressor pretty fast.

This is their website.
 

drew9242

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Top Left view. The plastic thing with ARB on it is the air filter the pump is under it. To give you an idea of the size that filter is about 50mm in diameter.
The silver cylinder next to it is the very small tank. At the bottom of the tank you can see the pressure switch and the air outlet.

IMG_0108_1_.JPG
 

drew9242

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Here is a side shoot. Sorry about the lack of photos, but i jammed it in there and it is hard to take photos of it. IMO i would put the pump as high as you can under the bonnet and away from the front. Water can be a issue if it is not situated in high and at the back. Also like newguy said heat is a issue, so as far away from the engine. The bracket that is supplied is quite universal for the pump. For example in my old car i had no room under the bonnet, so i managed to put it under the drivers seat of the car. Depending on what you need it for? if it is just to pump up tires quickly after a days 4WD then i would recommend it. Me and 70% of the people i go with have one, the other 30% wish they did. If you would like air lockers one day this pump can run it with the 2 extra solenoids on the other side of the tank. Just have a look at one at ARB shop and you can get a grasp of whats going on. For what they are worth they are a good pump.

IMG_0105_1_.JPG
 

pk.sax

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Hmnnnn. That is a positively tiny tank! Still doubtful I'll manage to fit it under the hood but a visit to arb can't hurt :) the only space in mine is above the steering column, which is right beside the engine by where the intercooler hose sits. Fucked up tight engine bay! Thanks for the links and pics, will post mine when I get it done.
 

newguy

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I shot him an email yesterday and this is his reply:

Most of us use an underhood "York" style air conditioning compressor. Junk yard special. (cheapest option $50?)They are like a mini motor and have internal lubrication. You can use the rotory style but they need lubrication. I should explain how to him directly. We also use a serious 12 volt one.$1,500. But need to look up the name. Most 12 volt ones are a joke. Hope that helps.
I know for a fact that they have an electrically actuated clutch on the belt drive for their (ex) air conditioning compressor. Their air tank is a standard "pancake" tank from a small garage/handyman compressor available almost anywhere. They usually mount theirs in the back somewhere.

Hope this helps.
 

drew9242

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They are a good option as well. I had one in my last car that was fully installed already. It worked a treat but it was ceased after 10 years service. I looked into getting another, but im not very handy with steel brackets and cars. It all got too hard for me so i just bought this pump. Mind you the ARB pumped as fast as my Aircon pump, but that could be because it was getting old?
 

pk.sax

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OK, got the ARB version just to keep it all realistic, I'm doin this on the street, no garage :p

These things are so neat, I'm impressed.

Mechanically, see no problems, pulled the seat out (bastard nuts were tight as hell, in the endthe brain kicked in and the hammer came out to force the issue), see a good spot to mount and should be able to route all wiring.... There is the problem, the wiring loom is doing my head in! Its not hard, I'm just ADD when it comes to wiring. Hopefully I will manage it tomorrow :)
 

drew9242

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Sweet. They are a nice piece of kit. I was stumped with the wiring as well. Ended up calling my electrician mate around. Hope it all works out for ya.
 

pk.sax

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Hehe. Glad I just decided what I wanted. Soooo many choices out there.

Have to say, those instructions can be a bit more organised. Maybe split off the air locker bits into a separate section or clearly mark them out, what really did stump me for a while was trying to follow the wiring of the switch. Eventually ended up jus starting at one end and following all the wiring to their last connection and mock connecting it up to work out what is redundant.
Hehehe, will see tomorrow if I end up asking my mate for help :)
 

pk.sax

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Mechanical: under front passenger seat, bolted to existing holes in seat rail.





So far, quite a neat fit. The ability to switch it around and rotate it in the mounting bracket is just awesome. Misses everything it should. Next: put seat back in car and install wiring.
 

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