Wyeast 1968

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PostModern

Iron Wolf Brewery
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I'm a bit of a Wyeast n00b, and have just bought some 1968 in the big smack pack. I've read enough to know how to do the smack thing and plan to make a starter the same way I have for all my White Lab and recultured yeasts, so I guess my question is more to do with this specific strain.

I used WLP002 (the equivalent White Labs strain, I'm led to believe) ages ago when I was quite new to brewing and had some issues getting good ales out with this yeast, it tended to floc quite early and leave me with >1.015FG beers which would then start to ferment again in the bottle, giving me gushers. Same thing happened to a mate brewing with the same yeast at the time.

I notice lots of people list 1968 as a favourite or at least a regular yeast. What have your experiences been with it, and any tips with dealing with this strain? I'm thinking particularly about it's rapid flocculation characteristic.

Cheers,
PoMo.
 

JasonY

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Great yeast this one, gives you a great malty beer. It does floc out very well and you sometimes need to rouse it to make sure it finishes the job but I have not had any problems with it in the times I have used it. Best yeast for english bitters I have used and they are crystal clear as well.

Using ringwood at the moment (only 1 brew so far) and that is proving more troublesome.
 

Guest Lurker

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Its a great yeast. My experience is give it plenty of time in primary to clean up after itself, and when the gravity stops dropping, rouse the crap out of it. With other yeasts I go the gentle swirl, with 1968 I go in there and dig it off the bottom.
 

THE DRUNK ARAB

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Agree with JasonY's comments.

Would like to add it goes very well with American styles as well. Seems to add backbone to the beer when highly hopped.

C&B
TDA
 

Steve

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I used it for the first time recently. I made a Boddingtons clone using this yeast (8 days primary and 6 days secondary). When I bottled it was crystal clear just as if they had being sitting for a month. Looking forward to it.
Cheers
Steve
 

PostModern

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Great malty beers, rouse after primary. Gotchya.

I part mash (about 3kg grain per brew) with the rest comprised of extract, and the odd bit of brown sugar or dextrose in English beers. As this strain is pretty low in attenuation, should I mash a tad cooler than I would with say S-04 or Coopers recultured yeast? I would offer a proposed recipe, but I'm still thinking about what to brew. Hoping to get 4-6 batches out of this sachet.
(I will happily listen to suggestions for great recipes with this yeast, too ;))
 

big d

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this post has come just at the right time.i used the 1968 over a year ago and can only remember it being very flocculant but adding great malt flavour.cant remember having to rouse it.way to many beers under the belt.ive put it in a brown ale today so will keep an eye on it and rouse as required.
onya tda for the info on the use in american beers.will try it out for sure.good luck with it pomo and keep us posted as to how you found it.


cheers
big d
 

RobW

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PostModern said:
I part mash (about 3kg grain per brew) with the rest comprised of extract, and the odd bit of brown sugar or dextrose in English beers.
[post="80408"][/post]​
I made a very similiar partial last weekend using 1968 & it went like the clappers for a couple of days & then flocced out at about 1020. I roused it and then dropped it a couple of days later. Now waiting, waiting..... Can't really give you any advice because it's my first time with this yeast but from the other comments it looks like a little patience may be required. <_< Guess I'll just let it sit in secondary for another week or two.
 

Gough

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I'd second most of the comments above. I used it recently and roused it on day 4 of ferment and then left it for a few days in secondary at ferment temps after an 8 day primary before cooling to cc for a week. Nice 'n malty going into the bottle and I got the attenuation suggested by Wyeast so was happy enough. Tasting my first bottle tonight as it happens... :) :chug:

Shawn.
 

Ross

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I've got 2 brews in CC at the moment using 1968. Got a couple of points more than expected with the summer ale went from 1057 to 1015 & the Bitter went from 1042 to 1012 as expected.

I always take these out of the brew fridge once they get just below 1020 & leave on the side in the house at 23c to 25c, this seems to knock the final points off, without any need to physicaly rouse the yeast...
 

RobW

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Ross said:
I always take these out of the brew fridge once they get just below 1020 & leave on the side in the house at 23c to 25c, this seems to knock the final points off, without any need to physicaly rouse the yeast...
[post="80435"][/post]​
Ross, how long do they take to finish after you take them out of the fridge?
 

Ross

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RobW said:
Ross said:
I always take these out of the brew fridge once they get just below 1020 & leave on the side in the house at 23c to 25c, this seems to knock the final points off, without any need to physicaly rouse the yeast...
[post="80435"][/post]​
Ross, how long do they take to finish after you take them out of the fridge?
[post="80584"][/post]​
I usually leave upto 7 days & then rack off into a cube, I seal this & leave at same temp, testing each 24hrs for any further sign of fermentation, once finished, CC at 2c until I want to keg...
 

RobW

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Ross said:
I usually leave upto 7 days & then rack off into a cube, I seal this & leave at same temp, testing each 24hrs for any further sign of fermentation, once finished, CC at 2c until I want to keg...
Thanks Ross, I'll try that.
 

THE DRUNK ARAB

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Has anyone tried this yeast in a high gravity brew, say > 1080?

I know that it extremely flocculant and rousing is required at times as I have used it plenty in beers <1060.

Just thought it would suit a Barley Wine as I would prefer a reasonably full bodied beer with a higher FG.

C&B
TDA
 

stephen

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From the Wyeastlabs website:

1968 London ESB Ale Yeast.
Probable origin: London, England
Beer Styles: British Pale Ales, Special Bitters
Commercial examples may include: Fullers London Pride, Young's and Greene Kings
Unique properties: This extremely flocculant yeast produces distinctly malty beers. Attenuation levels are typically less than most other yeast strains making a slightly sweeter finish. Ales produced with this strain tend to be fairly fruity. Fruitiness increased with higher fermentation temperatures 70-74 F, (21-23 C). Diacetyl production is noticeable and a thorough rest; 50-70 F, (10-21 C) is necessary. Yeast traps trub easily and autolysis is possible. A very good cask conditioned ale strain due to thorough flocculation characteristics. Beers become readily bright within days. Brilliant beers easily achieved without any filtration. Alcohol tolerance approximately 9% ABV. Flocculation - high; apparent attenuation 67-71%. (64-72 F, 18-22 C)

Steve
 

tdh

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I'd be tempted to pick a higher attenuator than 1968 for >1.080. The beers going to have loads of body due to its high OG.

I think 1968 is good for those British running beers that are between 1.035 and 1.045.

Try British 1335 or Thames Valley 1275. Still tasty yeasts but not bone dry fermenting.

tdh
 

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