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khendrickson

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Hey Everyone,

I put a mash in for a Partial of 90 Minute DogFISH Head IPA. I screwed up my mash, and ran on a temperature of 76 c the hole time. I was aiming for 65 C. Do you think that my mash came out okay? From the looks of it, it might turn out a bit cloudy. Any Suggestion or info?

The mash was 60 minutes at 76C, 1 KG of Pilsner Malt and 1Kg of Amber Malt. Mash in was 76.5 C and mAsh out was 70.2C.
 

manticle

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You'll either have a really thick dextrinous mash or bad conversion.

What was the SG of the mash at the end and what were you aiming for?
 

khendrickson

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You'll either have a really thick dextrinous mash or bad conversion.

What was the SG of the mash at the end and what were you aiming for?

Not sure on the SG, I only took it once I had completed my boil. It was 1.058 or so. I was aiming for 1.052. The recipe I was using didn't give me any SG in it so, I just kind of made it up as a went. Since I am new to the whole grain thing should I be taking an SG at Mash out as well? What will this give me for information?
 

Mayor of Mildura

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Not sure on the SG, I only took it once I had completed my boil. It was 1.058 or so. I was aiming for 1.052. The recipe I was using didn't give me any SG in it so, I just kind of made it up as a went. Since I am new to the whole grain thing should I be taking an SG at Mash out as well? What will this give me for information?
Pre boil gravity lets to check your efficiency to determine if you need to adjust your hopping. If you are over gravity and don't adjust your hopping your beer maybe less bitter. if you are below and don't adjust then it maybe more bitter.
 

khendrickson

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Pre boil gravity lets to check your efficiency to determine if you need to adjust your hopping. If you are over gravity and don't adjust your hopping your beer maybe less bitter. if you are below and don't adjust then it maybe more bitter.

Fair Enough. I will look into that in the next batch. That would explain why some of my stuff is super bitter and other barely have any bit to them.
 

mikec

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Fark!
I was over by 2 degrees on the weekend and was worried about that, but 11 over!

From my limited understanding this means you'll have lots of unfermentable sugars, so a high FG and a sweet, low alcohol beer.
Others may correct me...
 

QldKev

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Fark!
I was over by 2 degrees on the weekend and was worried about that, but 11 over!

From my limited understanding this means you'll have lots of unfermentable sugars, so a high FG and a sweet, low alcohol beer.
Others may correct me...

At 2 degrees I would get worried, at 11 I would pack up up brew kits and send it back. <_<
 

khendrickson

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At 2 degrees I would get worried, at 11 I would pack up up brew kits and send it back. <_<

YEAH YEAH, I am sure you have butcher a couple badly in your day. Guess this is what happens when you get all excited over your new set up and sampling one to many beverages whilst cooking.
 

manticle

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He's just giving you some shit mate. I'm sure you know one or two other people who regularly do that.
 

QldKev

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YEAH YEAH, I am sure you have butcher a couple badly in your day. Guess this is what happens when you get all excited over your new set up and sampling one to many beverages whilst cooking.
He's just giving you some shit mate. I'm sure you know one or two other people who regularly do that.


Yep just stirring :p We really need a sarcasm font on here :beer:
It's too easy to become anal about perfecting everything with our hobbies, and we forget to have fun doing it :eek:

Being a partial brew, it will still be drinkable. Just a bit fuller/sweeter than the normal. Great winter beer.

QldKev
 

brando

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All I can suggest is perhaps add 500gm of sugar/dextrose to the fermenter. That will combat the likely low-alcohol result, plus help to thin the beer out (i.e. drop the FG). Just a thought.
 

manticle

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It won't drop the FG on its own but it may help balance perception of dryness and it will boost ABV.
 

Nick JD

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I'm wondering if there would be any real conversion at all at 76C.
 

QldKev

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I'm wondering if there would be any real conversion at all at 76C.

It dropped to 70.2 before be mashed out, so the converting enzymes should have kicked back in, and had multiple stages of munching.

(Not a dig, honest query) Unless you are a subscriber to when enzymes are denatured they are killed, and it's not just a disruption to the cell activity. Then yes, 76 would have killed of all potential activity as it is mash out temperatures. I've never seen any research for the enzymes in malted barley to show either case, but would love to see some if there is any available.


QldKev
 

manticle

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I always see mash out/sacch enzyme denaturing temp being touted at around 77.6-78 and even then there is still a time factor involved so if 76 and dropping a degree every couple of minutes, there's every chance Alpha amylase got a good look in and even some beta waving in the background.

Also if the thermometer was measuring higher than it should......

I'd lower my expectations but I wouldn't give up. With no conversion, would there be a 1058 (was that without all other fermentables?)
 

khendrickson

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Who knows. I mean the thermometer was cheap. Live and learn right. No drama about you all stirring a bit god knows I deserved it. There is also a lot of ldme in it.
 

Muscovy_333

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It dropped to 70.2 before be mashed out, so the converting enzymes should have kicked back in, and had multiple stages of munching.

(Not a dig, honest query) Unless you are a subscriber to when enzymes are denatured they are killed, and it's not just a disruption to the cell activity. Then yes, 76 would have killed of all potential activity as it is mash out temperatures. I've never seen any research for the enzymes in malted barley to show either case, but would love to see some if there is any available.


QldKev


As far as i'm aware enzymes are coiled protein molecules with active sites specific to their function. They are not cells and are not alive.

When they are denatured they uncoil and completely lose function.

However, denaturation is definitely a time temperature process. Their would have been some conversion, but not a great deal if held at 76 degrees consistently.

I cant reference it, but i have read about enzyme denaturation for my own interest in response to a post 6 months ago...funny enough it was about a reverse mash temp step...and now we will have the experiment results on their way.
 

QldKev

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As far as i'm aware enzymes are coiled protein molecules with active sites specific to their function. They are not cells and are not alive.

When they are denatured they uncoil and completely lose function.

However, denaturation is definitely a time temperature process. Their would have been some conversion, but not a great deal if held at 76 degrees consistently.

I cant reference it, but i have read about enzyme denaturation for my own interest in response to a post 6 months ago...funny enough it was about a reverse mash temp step...and now we will have the experiment results on their way.

This is the point I don't understand. When the grain is malted it is kilned to in excess of 100c. So would that have denatured all the protein enzymes prior to use getting it, hence having zero diastatic power?

QldKev
 

Muscovy_333

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This is the point I don't understand. When the grain is malted it is kilned to in excess of 100c. So would that have denatured all the protein enzymes prior to use getting it, hence having zero diastatic power?

QldKev
From memory kilning is below 60degrees C (Probably around 100+ F)

The Mailard reaction (browning) would occur before 100 degrees C which would be more likely roasting of specialty malts. They would have limited diastatic power for sure due to enzyme denaturation.

Again no reference sorry.
 

Steve@PMF82

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Yeah pretty sure drying of Pale malts is around 45 - 50 degrees Celsius

Just went and checked its 40 to 45, but they are cured after around 80 degrees for a few hours. I am only guessing without getting out the brewing science pdf that the husk would protect the enzymes inside being denatured?
 

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