Quantcast

Delay After Adding Priming Sugar

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

jeremys

Member
Joined
28/2/12
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
Yesterday I bottled a strong stout (A RIS recipe, dialled down to 7.2%) but took about 90 minutes after adding the priming sugar to start bottling (I was brewing a pale ale at the same time and got distracted). I am wondering whether this will result in the beers being undercarbonated? Will the yeast have already started producing CO2 which will have escaped from my bottling bucket, or do I have nothing to worry about?
 

mwd

Awful Ale Apprentice
Joined
25/7/08
Messages
2,513
Reaction score
83
No worries 90 mins is nothing to be concerned about. It will take between a few days and 2 weeks for the beers to be fully carbed up depending on your storage temperatures.
 

jeremys

Member
Joined
28/2/12
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
No worries 90 mins is nothing to be concerned about. It will take between a few days and 2 weeks for the beers to be fully carbed up depending on your storage temperatures.
I generally don't even bother tasting any of my brews until they've had at least 2 weeks in bottles and generally find them to be at their best after 4-12 weeks. I was just wondering whether the 90 minutes would be enough to make an appreciable difference in final carbonation level. If the yeast consume the sugars at a steady rate, then you're right and I've got nothing to worry about.
 

MaltyHops

Well-Known Member
Joined
21/1/10
Messages
870
Reaction score
93
I was just wondering whether the 90 minutes would be enough to make an
appreciable difference in final carbonation level.
It's my view that a 60 mins (& 90 mins I guess) delay makes pretty
much no difference to the final carbonation - that it's actually beneficial
to allow the priming sugar solution to mix well evenly with the beer
before being bottled.

Consider that if time required to carbonate fully is a week (most likely
longer) - that's a total of 168 hours and 90 mins is less than 1% of that
time and it usually takes yeast a short while to get their act together
and start farting anyway.
 

jeremys

Member
Joined
28/2/12
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
It's my view that a 60 mins (& 90 mins I guess) delay makes pretty
much no difference to the final carbonation - that it's actually beneficial
to allow the priming sugar solution to mix well evenly with the beer
before being bottled.

Consider that if time required to carbonate fully is a week (most likely
longer) - that's a total of 168 hours and 90 mins is less than 1% of that
time and it usually takes yeast a short while to get their act together
and start farting anyway.
Good point, you two have put my mind at rest - thankyou! :D
 

Latest posts

Top