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Co2 - What Is Safe?

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BlackRat

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Hi everyone,

I have converted an old fridge into a kegerator and have come to the point where i need to purchase Co2.

My question is this:
What is a SAFE limit of Co2 to have in the home so if a leak should occur, kids / pets are not put at risk?
I remember reading on the KegKing website that 2.6Kg is the largest "safe" amount to have in a house.
Is this true or a marketing ploy to sell their "2.6Kg" bottles?

My kegerator will be stored in the laundry, which is roughly 5m long x 3m wide.

From what i have found, my options are the following:
2.6Kg from Keg King - $200 filled.
10Kg from Supagas - $150 filled - This seems like a much better deal hence my question above.

My secondary question is:
Is is safe to drive with a Co2 bottle in your car?
Eg, I live in Geelong and will need to travel to Melb for refills.

Thanks for the help once again guys.

Cheers,
BlackRat.
 

Truman42

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Read the link Glenw posted where I asked the same thing, but yes you should be okay to drive with the cylinder in your car.
Just make sure the valve is closed up tight and maybe keep it in your boot and wedged in somewhere so it cant roll around everywhere.
 

Dazza88

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co2 is heavier than air. mainly a concern in a totally closed environnent lije a cellar. drive with a window down. the fill limit is always less than the actual tank volume. i think its very naughty to fill abovr the stated limit. which is prob written on the bottle.
 

BlackRat

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Turns out people are better using the search function that I.

Thanks everyone.

BlackRat
 

Dazza88

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i had the same concerns. found the answers on here and asking a site sponser during a store visit.
 

NewtownClown

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When I learned to SCUBA dive, it was advised to transport our tanks with the valve pointed to the front of the vehicle; if an accident happens and the valve breaks off the tank it will not torpedo through the front seats :eek:
My new C02 bottle (2.6kg) arrived with a short length of PVC pipe slipped over the valve for protection which I use when transporting.
I now get my bottle filled at an aquarium supplies store nearby and can easily carry the tank the 500m round trip.
 

DU99

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:icon_offtopic: How many of us have seen this in back of Utes/vans "DO NOT transport cylinders with regulators or
equipment attached even if the cylinder valves are closed."
 

pcmfisher

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From what i have found, my options are the following:
2.6Kg from Keg King - $200 filled.
10Kg from Supagas - $150 filled - This seems like a much better deal hence my question above.

Isn't the 10kg Supergas a rental? Thats $150 per year to rent the bottle plus extra when you want to fill it . Mind you, 10kg of gas might last you a couple of years!

Where as the Keg King bottle, you own. So in just over a year you break even, and if you ever want to sell it you will still get something for it.

To me, renting bottles is extortion. -_-
 

Mike L'Itorus

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under 1000 ppm, normal background.
1000-2000ppm, possible complaint of poor air / drowsiness.
over 2000ppm...various symptoms. Nausea, headaches, reduced motor function, etc.
over 5000ppm serious hypoxia, leading to coma and death.

(note:NOT my figures. I've been drinking, so I forget the Aus standards ASA/ISO. Info from here

Meters, both instant reading, or constant monitoring are available if you are rooly and trooly worried. Not that much, considering. Couple of hundred bucks. Google is your friend on this one (although gas suppliers, eg BOC, should give you an indication as to need/cost).

Personally I don't bother...but that said, I have no kids or pets, my bottle is in a very large and well vented area, and I am more than conversant with the symptoms of mild hypoxia (oxygen deprivation), as I work in confined spaces that require continuous monitoring and/or BA.
 

Dazza88

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10kg of co2 will last ages, but will only be convenient if you don't have to lug it around for refill, and if your worried by the asphyxiation potential, would be of greater concern than a small bottle. I have a 6.8 kg mykegsonlegs bottle, it's still going on its first fill after about 15 corny kegs at a guess. I am going to swap down to a 2.6 kg bottle when it finally is emptied, which is probably a while off. Much more convenient size for my storage, transport and usage needs.

Call supagas and express you concerns, they are the experts after all.
 

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