Quantcast

Campden Tablets In Beer Or Other Solution?

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

Clutch

Brew your own beer, you'll save money.
Joined
2/7/11
Messages
723
Reaction score
38
Hey guys, I've searched and found a few threads on here dealing with their use in wine and mead, but I've read some comments about them not playing well with beer.
Will I get the same effect (reduction of fermentation) by filtering?
I've read that Coopers sits on a pallet for 2 weeks to bottle condition before sale, how do they prevent it from progressing any further, or is that just "aging" the beer? I've got a lager that was really crisp and nice after lagering for 2 weeks at 1c, then bottle carbed for 2 weeks, but it's slowly developing some flavours which, while not nasty, are not what I want in the beer.

Solutions? Suggestions? Token dickhead response?
 

manticle

Standing up for the Aussie Bottler
Joined
27/9/08
Messages
25,707
Reaction score
6,120
Location
Glenorchy, TAS
You wanting to use them as an anti-oxidant/preservative or to slow/cease fermentation?
 

Clutch

Brew your own beer, you'll save money.
Joined
2/7/11
Messages
723
Reaction score
38
Ceasing fermentation, or if filtering will work as well, without nasty tastes.
 

manticle

Standing up for the Aussie Bottler
Joined
27/9/08
Messages
25,707
Reaction score
6,120
Location
Glenorchy, TAS
Asking the question so you can get good advice but I have no personal experience of stopping ferment with sulphites as I think they come from the devil's arsehole.

My understanding is that they will inhibit yeast growth rather than definitively stop fermentation but that information is gleaned mainly from cidermaking threads and you would need to check it rather than rely on my recollection.

Personally I'd do anything to avoid adding that shit to my beer but it gives me a horrible headache, dry mouth and feelings of anxiety when combined with alcohol.
 

felten

Homebrew Conjecturist
Joined
13/5/09
Messages
2,536
Reaction score
45
I'm a little confused what you're trying to do here, but it sounds like you're trying to stop fermentation after FG has been reached?

Any flavours that develop after the beer has been lagered and then properly bottle conditioned aren't due to continued fermentation.

I've read that Coopers sits on a pallet for 2 weeks to bottle condition before sale, how do they prevent it from progressing any further, or is that just "aging" the beer?
I believe they keep the bottles around so they can carbonate properly, once the bottling sugar is gone the yeasts job is basically over. Flavours will change with aging and handling though due to chemical reactions and so on.
 

the_new_darren

Beer Dog
Joined
19/9/11
Messages
517
Reaction score
2
I have wondered whether Coopers really naturally carbonate or whether the force carb and add yeast for aesthetics?

tnd
 

felten

Homebrew Conjecturist
Joined
13/5/09
Messages
2,536
Reaction score
45
You're right, it could just be a giant conspiracy to make our beer cloudy. Those bastards.
 

the_new_darren

Beer Dog
Joined
19/9/11
Messages
517
Reaction score
2
I dont dispute that at one time they were definitely bottle primed. Just makes me wonder that you never get a flat one, never a highly carbonated one and always the same amount of yeast.

Perhaps to keep up "tradition"?

tnd
 

O'Henry

Well-Known Member
Joined
22/5/09
Messages
718
Reaction score
20
Perhaps they are professionals...
 

Latest posts

Top