Wort Cooling Times

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pbrosnan

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Hi all,

As I'm still not using my immersion chiller I'm using my old "stick the hot wort in the fridge overnight" cooling technique. I've done this with the last few batches and haven't noticed anything untoward however I'm just wondering about the theoretical consequences of what ends up being about an 12-16 hour cooling time.
I was prompted by something I read in Brew Your Own where it's stated that "the wort must be cooled rapidly, within 45 mins to reduce DMS precusors". Any thoughts?
 

pint of lager

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All the literature says to cool the wort as quickly as possible to avoid formation of DMS and to create a good cold break.

DMS shines through as a cooked vegie smell, often corn like.

I think good cold break removal would have effects on flavours and long term stability of the beer.

As always, your brewing methods will depend on what equipment you have access to, and cooling slowly in a fridge is only accepted when there is no wort chiller.

Get that immersion chiller working!
 

pbrosnan

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Hmm, OK POL I'll just have to take the plunge. I think the resistance to the IM is mainly out of superstition, ie if I change things will the result be rthe same. That being said I've been maning to use the IM sometime so ... here we go ....
 

Guest Lurker

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As POL says chillers are much better than pot cooling, and pretty easy, just remember

1) Remember to put the chiller in a good 15 min before the end of the boil and squish it down a bit so the coils all get sanitised by the boil.

2) Make sure the connections to the coil are below the pot rim so that any dribbles and leaks of cooling water cant get in the pot.

3) Collect the first litres of flow from the chiller for hot clean up water.

4) After 10 mins or so, you need to either stir the wort, or agitate the chiller to keep the wort circulating past the coils.

5) When agitating, dont grab the water out copper pipe with your bare hand, it hurts.
 

Stagger

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I don't put my immersion chiller in 15min before the end of the boil I just rinse with tap water and plunge in at flam out. I have had no ill affects in 30 brews, however I just may be lucky and playing with a loaded gun.

My thoughts are that it is going into boiling water and would kill any nasties, I have tried to put it in the boil 15min or so but it stoped the boil and took 5 or so mins to get going again.


Cheers and beers

Stagger
 

Gough

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Coodgee said:
why not just sterilise the chiller like everything else?
[post="66467"][/post]​

'Cause (IMHO :) ) it is much easier just to chuck it into your boil 15 minutes before the end.

Shawn.
 

Gout

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ensure there is no water in the coil, as if there is that adds to the "Mass" and hence will zap a heap of heat from the boil. If its just copper (eg no water in the pipes) it will reduce the heat it draws from the boil.

Of course then add the water to the coil when boil is finished etc
 

SJW

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My understanding of cold break is that it all started with the Yanks. They seem to be the only ones that get all excited about cold break because there main grain is 2 row (crap). Here in Aus we are blessed with the best quality barley in the world. Hence I never do a temp step when using Aussie grain even Pilsner, and they are always clear as a bell, due to the low protein levels in the barley.
So back to your question, if you are wanting to cool your work quickly to get cold break, my advice is dont bother, (if your using Joe White grain). Saying that, I do use a chiller but only to get down to a good pitching temp.
(I bet that stirs a few boys up)

STEPHEN
 

sosman

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SJW said:
My understanding of cold break is that it all started with the Yanks. They seem to be the only ones that get all excited about cold break because there main grain is 2 row (crap). Here in Aus we are blessed with the best quality barley in the world. Hence I never do a temp step when using Aussie grain even Pilsner, and they are always clear as a bell, due to the low protein levels in the barley.
So back to your question, if you are wanting to cool your work quickly to get cold break, my advice is dont bother, (if your using Joe White grain). Saying that, I do use a chiller but only to get down to a good pitching temp.
[post="66728"][/post]​
I'm not so sure on a few facts here (but that could be me, not you). I think it is the 6-row barley that is high in protein that the yanks use.

Do you have the facts to back up "we are blessed with the best quality barley in the world"? I seemed to remember that our mineral deficient soil resulted in barley low in minerals.

I have heard more than one local beer "guru" talking up the advantages of a good cold break.

Having said all that, I know people who have left their wort to cool overnight, where you would imagine the cold break is minimised and the beer is fine.
 

Aaron

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sosman said:
I'm not so sure on a few facts here (but that could be me, not you). I think it is the 6-row barley that is high in protein that the yanks use.
[post="66731"][/post]​
It is six row that the yanks sometimes use.

As far as chillers go I think the counter flow is far and away the best option. During winter with nice cold tap water my wort is cool and in the fermenter in no time, as fast as it will flow from the kettle. I can't imagine it would be much more difficult to build that an immersion chiller. Then again if you are lazy like me you can buy one. I got mine from Goliath.
 

pbrosnan

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The issue with the CFC is the cleaning. As you are going to pass wort through it you want to be damn sure there's not bugs in there. With the immersion its pretty well foolproof.
On the break issue, I've never had any problems withe cloudy beer. Just finishing a keg now and I was amazed by the clarity of the beer given that its never been filtered.
BTW Graham Sanders on the Oz Home Brewer forum thought the DMS thing was a furphy.
 
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