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Where is the stout head?

Discussion in 'General Recipe Discussion' started by Mat B, 11/4/17.

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  1. IsonAd

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  2. IsonAd

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    Posted 16/4/17
    Yep definitely struggling.
     
  3. Danscraftbeer

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    Posted 17/4/17
    I always do the old style mashing. Infusions and a decoction. 50c-protien rest, then Saccarif, then decoctions for 70c+ mash out. Theory being its good for less modified grains.
    Since Oats are not modified I think the steps do help. I get much better head retention doing this for all my beers now.
    Also many people skim froth off the boil. I don't believe in doing that. I feel it adds to good head character as well? that's debatable I guess.
     
  4. Mat B

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    Posted 19/4/17
    The carbonation on mine was on the lower side. I typically don't mine lower carb on ales and stouts. I'm sure that's not the cause.

    Sounds like most people are saying to toast or cook the oats first. Now that I really think of it, it may have even been rolled oats. I better check. It was definitely cheap homebrand rubbish though.

    What's the real benefit from using oats? Maybe it's just easier to leave them out of the next one and use wheat and carapils maybe? Or at least get some decent whole rolled oats and bake them.
     
  5. Danscraftbeer

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    Posted 19/4/17
    Benefit is its a good rounding off flavour. Smooth body and mouth feel even if you finish with a low gravity which is my usual habit.
    I've got this Porter that I kegged and bottled some off for longer lagering conditioning. It finished at 1.010 but you would sware its finished higher than that considering the nice smooth body it has. I don't think anything would be closely equal substitute to rolled oats.
    Checking records of that Porter I didn't roast them that time and It was 13% of the grain bill. I usually roast them (not too much or they don't smell nice if you over roast them) just for more toasty flavour.
     
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  6. Stouter

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    Posted 19/4/17
    Would toasting contribute to darker colour, or not be noticeable/measurable when already using a typical stout grain bill?
     
  7. Dan Pratt

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    Posted 19/4/17
    2 things.

    1st - make sure you always rinse the glassware before filling with beer, too often they have been in the dishwasher and that leaves a residue which kills head. Pretty sure that's not the issue buy worth a mention.

    2nd - 72c rest for foam formation, the oats will contribute to foam and that rest will amplify that.
     
  8. Stouter

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    Posted 19/4/17
    The 72C rest Pratty, how long?
     
  9. Mat B

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    Posted 19/4/17
    Definitely not the issue. I'm well into my beer drinking career to know that a clean glass is non-negotiable. Solid advice though.
     
  10. Jack of all biers

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    Posted 19/4/17
    10 mins.

    Also look at your alcohol content. Higher ABV is also a foam reducer. There isn't much you will do about it if you want an Extra Stout or RIS, but using other techniques and ingredients to compensate (as already mentioned) will help.
     
  11. good4whatAlesU

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    Posted 19/4/17
    Oats aren't necessarily a must, you can achieve pretty good round flavour through cold steeping I reckon.
     
  12. Lionman

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    Posted 23/4/17
    If you want a truly creamy head you need to use N2 rather than Co2. Nitrogen forms smaller bubbles in the head which gives it a creamier feel. A 75/25 mix of N2 and CO2 is commonly available.

    I think it works a bit differently than straight CO2 though and you might need to run higher pressures with longer beer lines.
     
  13. mozzle78

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    Posted 16/6/19
    I know it's an old thread but I wanted to add. I have made numerous Oatmeal stouts. Various recipes and never more than 7% oats. I always use the cheap, quick oats. While there is a creamy mouth feel, the oats kill the head every time.
     
  14. wide eyed and legless

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    Posted 16/6/19
    I use 11% flaked oats, the only additive in the commercial super market variety is the salt content which is OK in a stout recipe, I not a fan of too much carbonation so maybe somewhere you are slipping up.
    What is your recipe and method?
     
  15. mozzle78

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    Posted 17/6/19
    This is the recipe for one I am drinking now. One of many using various recipes. It was bottled on 24/02/19.

    Oatmeal Stout 18L batch. Based on Greg Hughes, "Home Brew Beer", recipe

    80% JW Ale Malt
    6% Flaked Quick Oats
    4% CaraAroma (Crystal 130L)
    4% Raw Sugar
    3% Chocolate Malt Dark TF UK
    2% Roast Barley Bairds UK

    17gm Magnum @60
    16gm EKG @5

    39IBUs 46EBC

    OG-1042 FG-1008 ABV-4.83%

    BIAB no sparge. No Chill.
    Strike temp 70C,
    Mash 1hr, 67.4C-66.3C.
    1hr boil.

    Fermented on rinsed US05. Bottled into 375ml bottles with 0.5 teaspoon of Caster sugar per bottle.
     

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