Suggestion for NZ / PACIFIC Blond Ale

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Danicomix

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Hi
I'm an Italian homebrewer...I'd like to brew a NZ/PACIFIC blond Ale for this summer!!
I'd like to brew something of refreshing and tropical for sunny days with my friend.
Can you suggest me something?
I've used sometimes hops like Motueka, Southern Cross, Wakatu, Wai-iti, Pacific Jade, and I like it a lot.

Thanks
Daniele
 

philrob

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I've never brewed this style, so can't comment in detail, but I'm sure someone on here will have an answer. Good luck.
 

JDW81

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Hey Daniele,

I used to make a nice easy drinking pacific style ale as one of my house beers. Really simple recipe. It was based on the Stone and Wood pacific ale and pretty close to the original.

Recipe as follows:
70% ale malt (choose whatever you like, I made with both Maris otter and common garden ale malt).
30% Wheat malt
Cascade hops to 20 IBUs at 60 minutes
Galaxy to 5 IBUs at flame out
Galaxy dry hop 1g/l after 4 days fermentation
Ferment with a clean ale yeast (US05, Wyeast American ale II)

Aim for an OG of 1046-1050 and a FG of 1008-1010

You can substitute any fruity hop you like around that base recipe.

Keg and drink fresh.

JD
 
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Bongiorno, birraio Daniele,

"Pacific ale" was popularised by Stone and Wood. They, along with early knockoffs, relied on late additions of Australian Galaxy hops.

Since then the meaning has come to mean ales that are much like APAs brewed with NZ and Aus hops, but generally less bitter than US West Coast styles and with a strong emphasis on fruity hop aromas. I've brewed a couple: it's not a favourite style, although, when I find myself in a pub with mostly macrobrews on offer, it's a relief to find a tap for Pacific ale.

If you want to hit the style's mode, use NZ and Aus hops for all late additions and by all means include Galaxy. But do not bitter with Galaxy. Personally, I prefer German Magnum or US Horizon or Mosaic for smooth bittering. Aim for about 25 IBUs or maybe 30

Otherwise, go all malt but keep it light. You could stick to base malt. JDW's recipe should work. If you use caramel malts, stick to the lightest coloured ones and use no more than about three percent in the grist. A little Vienna works, but is optional. What base malts do you have available?
 
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JDW81

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Bongiorno, birraio Daniele,

"Pacific ale" was popularised by Stone and Wood. They, along with early knockoffs, relied on late additions of Australian Galaxy hops.

Since then the meaning has come to mean ales that are much like APAs brewed with NZ and Aus hops, but generally less bitter than US West Coast styles and with a strong emphasis on fruity hop aromas. I've brewed a couple: it's not a favourite style, although, when I find myself in a pub with mostly macrobrews on offer, it's a relief to find a tap for Pacific ale.

If you want to hit the style's mode, use NZ and Aus hops for all late additions and by all means include Galaxy. But do not bitter with Galaxy. Personally, I prefer German Magnum or US Horizon or Mosaic for smooth bittering. Aim for about 25 IBUs or maybe 30

Otherwise, go all malt but keep it light. You could stick to base malt. JDW's recipe should work. If you use caramel malts, stick to the lightest coloured ones and use no more than about three percent in the grist. A little Vienna works, but is optional. What base malts do you have available?
I’ve seen a few people say don’t bitter with galaxy but it’s not something I’ve ever had an issue with. I’ve made quite a few beers with galaxy as a 60 minute addition and haven’t had the experience of harsh bitterness.

I’ll qualify it with I rarely bitter to more than 20 IBUs at 60 minutes with most beers, instead relying on a bigger Late addition for added bitterness and flavour.

definitely agree that a clean bittering hop like magnum is always a good option for many styles (particularly lighter styles with fruity hops and).
 

Danicomix

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Thanks a lot!!!


Hey Daniele,

I used to make a nice easy drinking pacific style ale as one of my house beers. Really simple recipe. It was based on the Stone and Wood pacific ale and pretty close to the original.

Recipe as follows:
70% ale malt (choose whatever you like, I made with both Maris otter and common garden ale malt).
30% Wheat malt
Cascade hops to 20 IBUs at 60 minutes
Galaxy to 5 IBUs at flame out
Galaxy dry hop 1g/l after 4 days fermentation
Ferment with a clean ale yeast (US05, Wyeast American ale II)

Aim for an OG of 1046-1050 and a FG of 1008-1010

You can substitute any fruity hop you like around that base recipe.

Keg and drink fresh.

JD
 

Danicomix

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Hi, i've available base malt like Simpson, bestmalz, dingemans, bairds, fawcett...what you suggest?

Bongiorno, birraio Daniele,

"Pacific ale" was popularised by Stone and Wood. They, along with early knockoffs, relied on late additions of Australian Galaxy hops.

Since then the meaning has come to mean ales that are much like APAs brewed with NZ and Aus hops, but generally less bitter than US West Coast styles and with a strong emphasis on fruity hop aromas. I've brewed a couple: it's not a favourite style, although, when I find myself in a pub with mostly macrobrews on offer, it's a relief to find a tap for Pacific ale.

If you want to hit the style's mode, use NZ and Aus hops for all late additions and by all means include Galaxy. But do not bitter with Galaxy. Personally, I prefer German Magnum or US Horizon or Mosaic for smooth bittering. Aim for about 25 IBUs or maybe 30

Otherwise, go all malt but keep it light. You could stick to base malt. JDW's recipe should work. If you use caramel malts, stick to the lightest coloured ones and use no more than about three percent in the grist. A little Vienna works, but is optional. What base malts do you have available?
 

philrob

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I'd suggest a relatively neutral base malt, so probably bairds, then bestmaltz, simpson, fawcett, dingemans, in that order for me.
I've never brewed one, but I've had them on tap locally to the brewer, and it's not a complicated beer. Simple malt with some fruity etc hops dancing along the top, if you get what I mean.
I'm sure JDW81's recipe will get you close.
 

Danicomix

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Ok thank you very much!!!

[QaUOTE="philrob, post: 1574998, member: 74152"]
I'd suggest a relatively neutral base malt, so probably bairds, then bestmaltz, simpson, fawcett, dingemans, in that order for me.
I've never brewed one, but I've had them on tap locally to the brewer, and it's not a complicated beer. Simple malt with some fruity etc hops dancing along the top, if you get what I mean.
I'm sure JDW81's recipe will get you close.
[/QUOTE]
 

Vic

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Ok thank you very much!!!

[QaUOTE="philrob, post: 1574998, member: 74152"]
I'd suggest a relatively neutral base malt, so probably bairds, then bestmaltz, simpson, fawcett, dingemans, in that order for me.
I've never brewed one, but I've had them on tap locally to the brewer, and it's not a complicated beer. Simple malt with some fruity etc hops dancing along the top, if you get what I mean.
I'm sure JDW81's recipe will get you close.
[/QUOTE]Keep grain on the light side Mainly pale malt and you can add up to 30% wheat malt, this will enhance head retention. Galaxy is fine for bittering. No need for 60 min addition. I suggest a 15min addition and then Galaxy and what ever NZ fruity hop you like in whirlpool and dry hop. For this style 15 to 22IBU.
 

An Ankoù

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Hi Daniele
Give this one a try. In spite of it being described as an English Golden Ale, believe me, the NZ hops come through. I've made it 3 times now.
As you live in Italy, you could use Italmalt Pilsner instead of the American pale malt. In fact you could use Italmalt Pilsner instead of the German Pilsner, too, although German Pilsner tends to be a bit lighter at 3-3.5 ebc. The last item is just flaked wheat or torrified wheat. It's not malted in spite of their description.
By the way, I'm English and I love this beer, but it's not really an English Golden Ale- see recipes for Summer Lightning and Exmoor Gold for examples of that style.
 

Danicomix

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after searching on this forum this is my idea of a easy-drinking NZ pale ale...what do you think?
I'm non sure if use wheat or Monaco malt in the recipe!

American Pale Ale
4.5%
Vol: 23 L
Boil: 60 min
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.010
IBU (Tinseth): 31
BU/GU: 0.71

MASH

Temp. — 52 °C10 min
Temp. — 66 °C50 min
Temp. — 72 °C10 min
Temp. — 78 °C10 min

GRIST
3.69 kg (85%) — Simpson Golden Promise
440 g (10%) — Simpsons Wheat Malt
220 g (5%) — Weyermann Carahell —
HOPS
36 g (21 IBU) — Southern Cross 13.1% — Boil — 10 min
69 g
(10 IBU) — Southern Cross 13.1% — 15 min hopstand @ 80 °C
58 g
— Southern Cross 13.1% — Dry Hop — 3 days
36 g
— Motueka 7% — Dry Hop — 3 days
36 g
— Pacifica 3.6% — Dry Hop — 3 days

YEAST
1 pacch — Fermentis US05 / American Ale 1272
 

An Ankoù

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after searching on this forum this is my idea of a easy-drinking NZ pale ale...what do you think?
I'm non sure if use wheat or Monaco malt in the recipe!

American Pale Ale
4.5%
Vol: 23 L
Boil: 60 min
OG: 1.044
FG: 1.010
IBU (Tinseth): 31
BU/GU: 0.71

MASH

Temp. — 52 °C10 min
Temp. — 66 °C50 min
Temp. — 72 °C10 min
Temp. — 78 °C10 min

GRIST
3.69 kg (85%) — Simpson Golden Promise
440 g (10%) — Simpsons Wheat Malt
220 g (5%) — Weyermann Carahell —
HOPS
36 g (21 IBU) — Southern Cross 13.1% — Boil — 10 min
69 g
(10 IBU) — Southern Cross 13.1% — 15 min hopstand @ 80 °C
58 g
— Southern Cross 13.1% — Dry Hop — 3 days
36 g
— Motueka 7% — Dry Hop — 3 days
36 g
— Pacifica 3.6% — Dry Hop — 3 days

YEAST
1 pacch — Fermentis US05 / American Ale 1272
Monaco Malt is a malt made only by Italmalt, as far as I know. The equivalent would be Munich malt 15-25 ebc. Munich and Wheat malts are as different as chalk and cheese. I think I'd go with the original recipe (above) and leave the Monaco malt for adding a bit of melanoidin to pilsners.
 

Danicomix

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I was thinking munich instead of wheat to have a more complex grist with a biscuit flavour to balance the hops!





Monaco Malt is a malt made only by Italmalt, as far as I know. The equivalent would be Munich malt 15-25 ebc. Munich and Wheat malts are as different as chalk and cheese. I think I'd go with the original recipe (above) and leave the Monaco malt for adding a bit of melanoidin to pilsners.
 

An Ankoù

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I was thinking munich instead of wheat to have a more complex grist with a biscuit flavour to balance the hops!
I see what you're getting at and I think you're right although the hops are fairly restrained and not as in-your-face as some others. I think you might be overdoing it by adding 10% munich and another 5% carahell, though. True, one's a a lightly roasted malt and the other a crystal malt, but I think you might start to lose that light, summer-ale character. Why not compromise and add 5% Monaco at the expense of some of the Golden Promise (ie use only 80%). I'd keep the wheat malt to lighten everything up. Simpson's Golden Promise tends to be light, anyway.
But if you ignore all this and go with your own instincts, it's still going to be a cracking ale. :cheers:
 

Danicomix

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Thanks for the reply!
I think i will brew the recipe without munich for the first batch!


I see what you're getting at and I think you're right although the hops are fairly restrained and not as in-your-face as some others. I think you might be overdoing it by adding 10% munich and another 5% carahell, though. True, one's a a lightly roasted malt and the other a crystal malt, but I think you might start to lose that light, summer-ale character. Why not compromise and add 5% Monaco at the expense of some of the Golden Promise (ie use only 80%). I'd keep the wheat malt to lighten everything up. Simpson's Golden Promise tends to be light, anyway.
But if you ignore all this and go with your own instincts, it's still going to be a cracking ale. :cheers:
 
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Using wheat that's a good grist for many pale-colored ales; Munich would take it maltier. Those hops will give a refreshing, fragrant beer, but if you've been tasting the Stone and Wood and want something close, you need Galaxy in the mix. It imparts a distinctive, fruity character that marketers like to call passion fruit, but Kiwis also tag that on many of their hops. I get peach out of Galaxy.

Whatever, just brew it, you'll like it.
 
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