Quantcast

Reducing Oxidation while Bottling

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

carrobrew

Pro
Pro
Joined
14/12/19
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
Carrington
Anyone have any good tips, methods or equipment for reducing oxidation from bottling process.

I currently use the PET bottles and have been using the carb drops coz I had some left over still. I then squeeze the air our of the headspace and put in the fermenter fridge with the inkbird probe on the side of one bottle to carb up at around 19-20c.

I currently bottle straight from primary after cold crashing for a few days using one of those bottle wands with the blue tip. This issue I have is sometimes I hit the middle of bottom of the bottle or hit the top of a carb drop and I think that causes some splashing/nucleation when filling the bottles (I can hear it in some bottles).

Would love to jump to kegging but no cash at the moment. :'(

I do have a second Fermenter which I could use to bulk prime. What do you recommend? Are the blue tip fillers ok or is there a better option? I have 5m of new silicon hosing I can utilise/cut up if needed.

I want to make sure I don't oxidise this next batch at all. Is an IPA with plenty of late boil additions, whirlpool additions and a hefty dry hop so I want to make sure I retain all that flavour. Is tasting amazing in primary as of my last hydro reading on Monday when I dry hopped. Is crashing now and hopefully bottling tomorrow (fridge takes a while to get to 3c). Either all in PET or a mix of PET and glass flip tops.

What are your bottling methods?
 

kadmium

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/3/07
Messages
615
Reaction score
398
Not much further you can do other than fermenting in a pressure fermenter (don't have to pressure ferment) about $60 and then use a counter pressure bottle filler to bottle. Don't have to carb in the fermenter, you could still use bulk priming followed by using a beer gun which allows you to first purge a bottle with CO2 and then fill.

The advantage is, you would have a co2 tank, regulator, and pressure capable fermenter which are useful for when or if you do go into kegging.

I know @wide eyed and legless bottles from pressure fermenters he had modified, hopefully he can help further.
 

carrobrew

Pro
Pro
Joined
14/12/19
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
Carrington
Not much further you can do other than fermenting in a pressure fermenter (don't have to pressure ferment) about $60 and then use a counter pressure bottle filler to bottle. Don't have to carb in the fermenter, you could still use bulk priming followed by using a beer gun which allows you to first purge a bottle with CO2 and then fill.

The advantage is, you would have a co2 tank, regulator, and pressure capable fermenter which are useful for when or if you do go into kegging.

I know @wide eyed and legless bottles from pressure fermenters he had modified, hopefully he can help further.
Fair enough.

Would love to pressure ferment and keg but no cash for CO2 or another fermenter.

Good to know my method is ok.

Just gotta be careful with where the filler hits the bottom of the bottle I suppose.

Really enjoying improving my process bit by bit. The missus asked if I was done buying homebrew gear the other day, I just laughed. :fallingoffchair:
 

kadmium

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/3/07
Messages
615
Reaction score
398
Fair enough.

Would love to pressure ferment and keg but no cash for CO2 or another fermenter.

Good to know my method is ok.

Just gotta be careful with where the filler hits the bottom of the bottle I suppose.

Really enjoying improving my process bit by bit. The missus asked if I was done buying homebrew gear the other day, I just laughed. :fallingoffchair:
Yeah, I brewed an awesome Galaxy SMaSH and bottled. By time time it was carbed, I had 2 weeks before it started to oxidise.

I would say NEIPA is the most prone to oxidation, and Hazy IPAs etc too.

It might be one of those things you spend time perfecting, or change course and embrace what bottling can do that kegging cannot.

Quads, Russian Imperial Stouts, Heffeweizens, Belgian Wits are all beers that don't traditionally keg as good as they bottle.

Nothing like a yeasty, clove amd banana bomb hefeweizen on a summer day. Conversely, ask @cloudsurfer how great a RIS or Quad 12 months in the bottle is, on a cold winter day.

Heaps of other beers do well bottled too, like ESBs, Brown Alea, Stouts really anything that doesn't have a metric **** tonne of hops in it.
 

philrob

Moderator
Staff member
Moderating
Joined
17/2/18
Messages
237
Reaction score
172
Location
NSW
I've been brewing for 14 years, and have only ever bottled. I only use Coopers longnecks.
The blue tipped bottling wand is all I use.
I don't use the carb drops, but use dextrose for my priming.
All my brews have a little froth as the bottle fills, but I believe that is just CO2 coming out of the beer as it fills the bottle. I fill mine level to expel the froth, then cap them all at the end when they are all filled.
I've never had a problem with oxidation, not even with heavily hopped beers like a IIPA, although they get consumed rather quickly, as do Hefeweizens.
Darker beers are often consumed over many months, with no problems.
Really, if you squeeze your PET bottles while capping them, where does the oxygen come from? I wouldn't go looking for a solution to a problem I don't believe you have.
 

butisitart

Well-Known Member
Joined
15/3/14
Messages
571
Reaction score
249
Location
brisbane
i read somewhere, back in the day, can't remember where, but, as a bulk priming bottler with the plastic wand,
if you fill to the top of the neck, then the amount of normal air left in the bottle by the displacement of the wand gets the oxygen pretty much consumed in the carbonation process anyway.
again, never oxidation issues, even on bottles 1-2 years old.
if you think about wine, it only oxidises if there is some sort of leak in the cork and occurs over extended time. undamaged bottle caps and swing tops are pretty airtight.
 

mje1980

Old Thunder brewery
Joined
14/12/04
Messages
5,643
Reaction score
1,372
I have never noticed oxidation in my bottled beers and I angle the bottle to the fermenter tap ( standard ) and slowly fill. I leave most bottled beers for weeks, and saison I don’t touch for months ( try to anyway ) and don’t notice any oxidation.
 

carrobrew

Pro
Pro
Joined
14/12/19
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
Carrington
I've been brewing for 14 years, and have only ever bottled. I only use Coopers longnecks.
The blue tipped bottling wand is all I use.
I don't use the carb drops, but use dextrose for my priming.
All my brews have a little froth as the bottle fills, but I believe that is just CO2 coming out of the beer as it fills the bottle. I fill mine level to expel the froth, then cap them all at the end when they are all filled.
I've never had a problem with oxidation, not even with heavily hopped beers like a IIPA, although they get consumed rather quickly, as do Hefeweizens.
Darker beers are often consumed over many months, with no problems.
Really, if you squeeze your PET bottles while capping them, where does the oxygen come from? I wouldn't go looking for a solution to a problem I don't believe you have.
I don't really think I have an issue was just being over cautious about bottling this next brew I suppose.

Good to hear you use the same wand and get great results.

What sparked me thinking about this was my Pale ale which is now 3 weeks in bottle

Tried it 2 weeks after bottling, it was no good. It wasn't fully carbed and I think there was still sugar in solution from priming so it just tasted like malt sweetness + more sweetness and no hop flavour. After waiting the extra week it's a completely different beer. I thought I had oxidised or ruined the whole batch somehow but the beer I sampled a few days ago was very nice. Could hold a head better and be slightly more carbed but that may improve as time goes by.

Had a few more last night and now some are great and some are not as good, not too bad but the hop flavour is a bit subdued. It could just be early days and will develop as they age more.

I am probably over thinking it. Had my amber ale last night bottled using the same method and it was heaven!!! Very pleased.

The IPA will bottle tomorrow and just want to make sure I maintain all the flavour I can.
 

carrobrew

Pro
Pro
Joined
14/12/19
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
Carrington
Yeah, I brewed an awesome Galaxy SMaSH and bottled. By time time it was carbed, I had 2 weeks before it started to oxidise.

I would say NEIPA is the most prone to oxidation, and Hazy IPAs etc too.

It might be one of those things you spend time perfecting, or change course and embrace what bottling can do that kegging cannot.

Quads, Russian Imperial Stouts, Heffeweizens, Belgian Wits are all beers that don't traditionally keg as good as they bottle.

Nothing like a yeasty, clove amd banana bomb hefeweizen on a summer day. Conversely, ask @cloudsurfer how great a RIS or Quad 12 months in the bottle is, on a cold winter day.

Heaps of other beers do well bottled too, like ESBs, Brown Alea, Stouts really anything that doesn't have a metric **** tonne of hops in it.
Mate the list just keeps growing of beers I want to make! Hefe might have to be next
 

butisitart

Well-Known Member
Joined
15/3/14
Messages
571
Reaction score
249
Location
brisbane
I don't really think I have an issue was just being over cautious about bottling this next brew I suppose.


Tried it 2 weeks after bottling, it was no good. It wasn't fully carbed and I think there was still sugar in solution from priming so it just tasted like malt sweetness + more sweetness and no hop flavour. After waiting the extra week it's a completely different beer. I thought I had oxidised or ruined the whole batch somehow but the beer I sampled a few days ago was very nice. Could hold a head better and be slightly more carbed but that may improve as time goes by.
un-carbed can have a lot to do with carbonation levels in bottled beer. eg, a stout or brown with low carbonation levels (120g dextrose in 23L) will look pretty flat and lifeless for 2 months, then come really good and creamy.
kolsch, wheat etc on high carbonation levels (260gm dextrose) will have a good head a lot earlier on.
so maybe have a look at (and consider) your carbonation levels and what you want to achieve there.
 

Cloud Surfer

Well-Known Member
Joined
2/8/20
Messages
127
Reaction score
46
Location
Newcastle
Mate the list just keeps growing of beers I want to make! Hefe might have to be next
I’m bottling a Hefeweizen tomorrow. I like Hefe a lot and can’t wait to see how it turns out. I deliberately fermented it cool, 18C and finished at 20C. I’m going to do it again and ferment it hot and compare the different esters.
 

kadmium

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/3/07
Messages
615
Reaction score
398
I’m bottling a Hefeweizen tomorrow. I like Hefe a lot and can’t wait to see how it turns out. I deliberately fermented it cool, 18C and finished at 20C. I’m going to do it again and ferment it hot and compare the different esters.
Then you can compare over pitch, under pitch, oxygen no oxygen, liquid, dry and the list goes on. And if you get into all grain, ferrulic acid rests vs non oh shit it just multiplies
 

Cloud Surfer

Well-Known Member
Joined
2/8/20
Messages
127
Reaction score
46
Location
Newcastle
Then you can compare over pitch, under pitch, oxygen no oxygen, liquid, dry and the list goes on. And if you get into all grain, ferrulic acid rests vs non oh shit it just multiplies
Can’t you just give me all the answers and save me the time.
 

MHB

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/10/05
Messages
5,992
Reaction score
3,434
Location
Newcastle
Yer sure, the right answer to nearly all brewing questions is a resounding maybe!
If that doesn't cover it a follow up "it depends" should be all you need.
Mark
 
Joined
5/9/13
Messages
7,125
Reaction score
3,360
Location
Mulgrave Victoria
Not all oxygen is taken up from the head space as some imagine, leaving as small a head space as possible in the bottle, storing the finished beer below 20 C will help. I think it's more a problem for commercial breweries, shipping beer no control of temperature, shaking around, doesn't help. I had a Scottish heavy which I kept, (not all of it) for 2.5 years. Actually didn't mind too much the sherry like flavours coming through, just the blinding headaches I got from drinking it. It was still bright and crystal but definitely oxidised.
 

kadmium

Well-Known Member
Joined
12/3/07
Messages
615
Reaction score
398
The oxygen does damage to the beer in the bottle well before the yeast have a chance to 'scrub it out' or whatever. An advantage of PET bottles is the ability to squeeze them, and thus remove air from the neck.

The downside is you can't store them as long as glass, and you can't really wash them hot etc. I used both Glass and PET, now I have a small stock of PET bottles just in case.

Agreed with WEAL that some beers really do benefit, if not aren't damaged by some light oxidation. That's why I was perhaps pointing OP to more relevant styles that fit bottling better than kegging. Each has their pro's and cons.
 

Simon N

Active Member
Joined
20/9/17
Messages
25
Reaction score
7
Also look at how/when adding dry hops, as well as preventing oxygen ingress while cold crashing. I’ve always bottled and for me biggest improvement was further upstream changes.
 

butisitart

Well-Known Member
Joined
15/3/14
Messages
571
Reaction score
249
Location
brisbane
oxidisation for me is another thing we as home brewers can sit around and get paranoid about, but at the end of the day, if you do the basics, it's highly unlikely to bugger up your bottling. i agree that there are 1% gains, but by doing the plain basics, I for one have never had a noticeable taste. something else to stop getting too anxious over.
 

carrobrew

Pro
Pro
Joined
14/12/19
Messages
55
Reaction score
14
Location
Carrington
Bottle today. Went well. Tried to minimise any splashing but can still hear a bit when pushing the wand into the bottom of the bottle. Not really splashing but just noise when the beer rushes out of the end of the wand.

Didn’t matter where I put it, sometimes was very minimal but varied. Hopefully won’t be an issue. This is a very hoppy beer which is why I’m obsessing over it.

Tastes amazing without carb so I’ll be able to compare in a few weeks when it is carbed up to see if I’ve retained the taste.

Recipe if anyone was curious
Father’s Day Ipa - Carrowbrew
Brewfather
 

Attachments

Latest posts

Top