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Kegging Vs Bottling Beer

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Grmblz

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@Grmblz do you find you get much sediment when naturally carbonating in a keg?
Is it just a case of the first couple of pints being cloudy and the rest is ok?
Depends on your process, and gear. Yeast is the big one, a high floc'g strain being essential for clear beer, or you can use a floating dip tube (same as a Fermzilla) in your keg and draw from the top (this can be a bit hit and miss using the KL float as it jams up sometimes and sucks air, err CO2, Clear Beer Draught System
is far superior if you have the coin alternatively a closed pressure transfer to a serving keg.
If you have a hard yeast pan in the bottom of the keg then it's only the first couple of pours (but this takes extra time for the yeast to really settle) an old trick is to slightly bend the bottom third of the dip tube so that it just contacts the side of the keg, costs about 250ml in lost beer (this is what I do)

We used to serve Worthingtons white shield, an English classic bottle conditioned IPA that was primed with two yeast strains and had quite a layer of hard floc'g yeast on the bottom.
Customers fell into one of three categories, the "I don't care" easy, the "has to be crystal clear" very careful pour as even the slightest bit of haze resulted in rejection, and "I want it all in my glass" resulting in pouring down to a third of the bottle then swirling to get every bit of yeasty goodness back into suspension before dumping it all into the glass, very time consuming.
I only mention this to point out that it's really strokes for folks, I'm a swirl it all up type of guy (style dependant of course) so I don't mind a bit of haze and quite like the bottle conditioned flavour you get from keg conditioning, if you're a crystal clear type then the pain of a closed pressure transfer through a filter to a serving keg, might mean force carbing is a better option, you just lose the extra shelf life, the ease of carbonation (see Marks #55 ^ ) and the slightly different taste, but that might suit you of course.
 
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MHB

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Bit like ordering a Coopers, you get those who roll the bottle along the bar, those who drip-feed the beer into the glass. Me, given a choice will always pour my own, sort of just what comes out if you pour sensibly.

Dave70, shouldn't matter much, most of the flavour's yeast makes are produced early in he ferment. just note that the hotter beer is the faster it changes. Both for good and ill. but that beer matured slowly and cooler tends to taste better longer... Personally I like to mature at around 18oC, good balance between flavour and speed.
Mark
 

S.E

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an old trick is to slightly bend the bottom third of the dip tube so that it just contacts the side of the keg, costs about 250ml in lost beer (this is what I do)
Another option if you don’t want to bend or cut your long liquid dip is replace it with a short gas dip and a length of silicone tube and let it hang without a float just short and off the bottom of the keg.
 

DazGore

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I have the ssbrewtech fermenter and 2 Brite tanks that i serve from. Everything is glycol chilled and transferred under pressure.
The reason I ask is I have a Belgium dubbel in my fermenter and was thinking of naturally carbonating a couple of kegs and to age/condition for a few months.
I don't fancy bottle conditioning.
I have the cannula canning system, so may do an experiment of can conditioning.
 

Grmblz

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I have the ssbrewtech fermenter and 2 Brite tanks that i serve from. Everything is glycol chilled and transferred under pressure.
Very nice bit of kit, so clarity is high on your priorities?

The reason I ask is I have a Belgium dubbel in my fermenter and was thinking of naturally carbonating a couple of kegs and to age/condition for a few months.
I don't fancy bottle conditioning.
Send me one for Christmas 😋

I have the cannula canning system, so may do an experiment of can conditioning.
On the face of it canning is the way to go but I've seen mixed reports, and probably a fair bit of op error, apparently the semi auto has solved some of the early cannular issues. It's certainly a way to mitigate oxygen pickup associated with HB canning although clarity may be an issue, would love to hear how you go with this, I've been looking at canning for my big beers but the jury seems to be out (US commercial breweries) on extended ageing as compared to bottles. Please keep us posted on any progress.
 

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