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Fragrant Rice Additions.

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Dave70

Le roi est mort..
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Kind of loosely inspired by this beer and its use of red rice (allegedly anyway, some say the red colouration is a result of the addition of koji), I'm curious if anybody has had a go at exploiting the actual character of the rice itself, rather than just to lighten up your lager.

I was thinking if you could impart some of the aroma of say Jasmine or Basmati rice underneath some moderate hopping with something like EKG, Saaz or Hallertau in a light bodied lager - or an ale maby - it may be interesting.

If you have given this a shot successfully, what was your procedure for preparing and mashing the rice? And I suppose, how much did you use?
I'm guessing rice hulls would be a mandatory addition to the mash.


 

Bada Bing Brewery

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Dave
I use Jasmine rice in Chappo's aussie lager and it is a great drop. It adds texture and aroma which I think makes this particular beer. Last week I used 1.2kg in a double (40L) batch. Cooked the shit out of the rice until it is nearly a rice mush. Added it at protein rest 55C before step mashing normally. Rice gulls are very helpful if you are 3V ;) .
My 2c
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BBB
 

bum

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Dave, I get something particularly sake/soju-like from that beer so the rice definitely adds something (even if it isn't the colour, as suggested). Given that this flavour is there, I'd be looking for some process other than/additional to the normal boil it, mash it technique - may even be a fermentation process.
 

Dave70

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Dave, I get something particularly sake/soju-like from that beer so the rice definitely adds something (even if it isn't the colour, as suggested). Given that this flavour is there, I'd be looking for some process other than/additional to the normal boil it, mash it technique - may even be a fermentation process.

They, Kiuchi Brewery, say of it - red rice ale - larger malt, Chinook hops, red rice, flaked barley. The red hue possibly comes from the coloration of the pericarp of the 'red rice' itself. May actually lend nothing to the flavor itself.

Then I copied this from the great brewers website.

The brewing process starts with the polishing, washing, soaking and steaming of rice [25% of total grain bill] to break down complex type b-starch molecules into short type a ones. Only type A starch molecules can be converted into sugar by the use of sake yeast. Afterwards, pilsner malt is added to the mashing process. After lautering Hallertauer hops is added in the brew kettle. Further complicating matters, two different yeasts, ie ale and sake yeast, must be used as regular beer yeast is not able to convert the rice sugars into alcohol.

So..I dunno..
Sounds like they're going through the initial conversion stage of sake making and throwing the rice into the mash tun instead of the fermentation vat.

Ferment the whole mess out with Wyeast 4134 and some kind of Belgian (?) yeast and there you go.

Obviously, its just that simple..
 

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