Anyone Fancy The New Moo Brew?

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pbrosnan

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It's an imperial stout but I'm afraid it's a bit out of my league, $600/carton or $100/4 pack if ordered from the brewery. Pity, Moorilla make good beer.

Moo Brew Stout
 

spog

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mmmm moorilla, was in tassie 3wk's ago,bloody good beer.
did the hellyer's distillery also,again bloody good.
tried iromhouse beers (sorry ironhouse) not bad.
van diemens brews not so good,drove through evanstone forgeting they are there so bought the brews at a pub latter.
two metre tall brews i missed,they were'nt open on the day i went through,but could'nt get the brew's anywhere else,so give's me a reason to go back one day. just so happens that the 2mtall brewery is in new norfolk where my dad ended up after jumping ship with his mate in the late 1940's.
buuut visited the 7 shed's brewery,sampled some brew,s and had 12 bottles sent back home,bloody nice beers,don't ask for a review,but bloody good,just as good and equal to moo brew .both brew's top shelf for me......cheers......spog........
 

neonmeate

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most people here could make something better for 50c a stubby
 

Kai

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most people here could make something better for 50c a stubby


I might be going slightly off-topic here, but I bet you most couldn't. Not for an imperial stout, not at prices these days. Back when I coulld pick up a bag of malt for 30$, maybe.
 

AussieJosh

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Sorry my bad now i see....

" Freight is $12 per four pack"

Must have been a expensive recipe!
 

neonmeate

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I might be going slightly off-topic here, but I bet you most couldn't. Not for an imperial stout, not at prices these days. Back when I coulld pick up a bag of malt for 30$, maybe.
all right maybe $1 a stubby.

ridiculous markups happening here anyway. bit like those laughable redoak beers (got some framboise sitting around for a bit too long... let's put the price at $75 and see who buys it...) the price has nothing to do with the cost of making it. how much does it cost moorilla to make this beer?
 

BrenosBrews

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I don't know why they refuse to bottle a non-barrel aged version of their Imperial Stout. Oh that's right, because then they cannot put a crazy mark up on it.
I know craft beer isn't cheap but $25 per 330ml bottle? Get fucked.
 

kevin_smevin

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I don't know why they refuse to bottle a non-barrel aged version of their Imperial Stout. Oh that's right, because then they cannot put a crazy mark up on it.
I know craft beer isn't cheap but $25 per 330ml bottle? Get fucked.

Have any of you tried it. It's a really really good beer. It's a pretty complex beer to make - i think it takes about 9 months all up. Aged in oak and then blended, then aged in the bottle. There is probably about 4 times more labour involved in producing this beer compared to their standard brews. These kind of specialty craft beers are expensive. $25 is alot of money but i couldn't imagine it being worth less then $20 a bottle. Holgate's recent release Beezlebub's Jewels has a RRP of $60. Also, Moo Brew only use the best of everything, even their packaging costs about twice as much as any other craft brewery. Food for thought anywho.
 

Kranky

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A decent proportion of the cost of this beer would be due to (unfair) taxes. Having said that Murray's imperial stout sells for $10 a bottle from the brewery, but then it isn't barrel aged. In the USA imperial oak aged stouts can range from about $12 and up, mostly in bombers (about 650ml I think).

At a rough guess you could make something similar (using oak chips instead of a barrel) for about $3 per litre. $100 for 4 stubbie's is equal to about 30 litres of home brewed RIS. While I'd like to try this beer I'd rather make my own.
 

jlm

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What does murrays Aa go for? Not as much but certainly up there I think. Moorilla's marketing is very wanky though, pushing the exclusivity thing which can put people off. Having said that I've drunk one before and quite enjoyed it. I'll be drinking a whiskey Willie warmer later today on the mouth of the huon and think I'll enjoy that too.
 

BrenosBrews

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Have any of you tried it. It's a really really good beer. It's a pretty complex beer to make - i think it takes about 9 months all up. Aged in oak and then blended, then aged in the bottle. There is probably about 4 times more labour involved in producing this beer compared to their standard brews. These kind of specialty craft beers are expensive. $25 is alot of money but i couldn't imagine it being worth less then $20 a bottle. Holgate's recent release Beezlebub's Jewels has a RRP of $60. Also, Moo Brew only use the best of everything, even their packaging costs about twice as much as any other craft brewery. Food for thought anywho.
Yes, I have tried it. It was OK. Somewhere in the process it had become oxidised. I can assure you I understand the process involved in brewing a barrel aged beer. Given they got the barrels for free I don't see how this beer is worth $25 dollars and I don't really want my beer to cost more because they decide to use more expensive, fancy bottles either. However, I really hope they bottle their new Saison as that is a very nice beer indeed. Also I have tried Beezlebub's Jewels...glad I didn't pay for it.
 

jpScarfac3

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They also cold-freight everywhere but only use dry yeast.

After attending their brewery tour (stand in their now unused brewery at the vineyard and sample the beers), they seem to be targeting the rich folk who can afford $100 for a case of beer and $200+ selection of wines they have on offer i.e. filling a whole in their alcohol beverage product range.

And no, I did not try the stout...
 

Thirsty Boy

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I don't know why they refuse to bottle a non-barrel aged version of their Imperial Stout. Oh that's right, because then they cannot put a crazy mark up on it.
I know craft beer isn't cheap but $25 per 330ml bottle? Get fucked.
Why would you not charge $25 a stubby if you knew you were able to sell it for that much? Don't you like money?

I have heard and read some very good, very convincing arguments to the tune that one of the reasons beer does not and cannot command the same respect and position on beverage lists in restaurants across the world as wine is that it is simply not expensive enough - not special enough. Beer is "ordinary" and no one wants ordinary on their wine list.

So, when someone makes a special beer, puts it in a special bottle and charges a special price for it, they are actually helping to rectify the situation that so many beer lovers complain about - and yet the brewers that do it will be virtually unable to sell their beer to that same set of beer lovers... Because they want to have their cake and eat it too, they want beer to be as special as wine, as respected as wine, to sit in its deserved place on the crisp white table cloth next to the $100 bottle of plonk... But god help you if you try to charge them the same sort of price for it as the wine! "Its only a beer after all"
 

pbrosnan

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Why would you not charge $25 a stubby if you knew you were able to sell it for that much? Don't you like money?

I have heard and read some very good, very convincing arguments to the tune that one of the reasons beer does not and cannot command the same respect and position on beverage lists in restaurants across the world as wine is that it is simply not expensive enough - not special enough. Beer is "ordinary" and no one wants ordinary on their wine list.
Shhh, don't say it too loud they'll all want one. I mean seriously why do you care about the amount of respect that beer gets? Go to Belgium you'll find plenty of respect there, at reasonable prices as well. Look at the US, some of the best beer in the world at very affordable prices. The wine scene is overloaded with obfuscating, self-agrandising opinion (search YouTube for "Posh Nosh" and listen to Richard E. Grant's excellent satire of wine appreciation), if beer can avoid this tendency then so much the better.
 

Supra-Jim

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Shhh, don't say it too loud they'll all want one. I mean seriously why do you care about the amount of respect that beer gets? Go to Belgium you'll find plenty of respect there, at reasonable prices as well. Look at the US, some of the best beer in the world at very affordable prices. The wine scene is overloaded with obfuscating, self-agrandising opinion (search YouTube for "Posh Nosh" and listen to Richard E. Grant's excellent satire of wine appreciation), if beer can avoid this tendency then so much the better.
You could also listen to the Freakonomics podcast on wine and it's perceived quality vs price issues. Was quite funny.

Cheers SJ
 

Thirsty Boy

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Shhh, don't say it too loud they'll all want one. I mean seriously why do you care about the amount of respect that beer gets? Go to Belgium you'll find plenty of respect there, at reasonable prices as well. Look at the US, some of the best beer in the world at very affordable prices. The wine scene is overloaded with obfuscating, self-agrandising opinion (search YouTube for "Posh Nosh" and listen to Richard E. Grant's excellent satire of wine appreciation), if beer can avoid this tendency then so much the better.
Well, i lament the lack of good beer available when i go to a restaurant, the lack of knowledge about beer in general and wish it were different.

In belgium, the biggest selling beer is a pale lager that the poms refer to as wife beater. They used to respect beer and have largely stopped doing so.

Besides, we aren't talking about a market where beer is already respected, we are talking about a market where beer is for drinking in the hot weather, the most popular beer is VB, the biggest growing brands are low carbohydrate lagers and midstrength travesties.... I thought that as beer lovers we collectively didn't like this and wanted it to change?

The beer market in australia and all the other mature beer markets is in decline, the thing that it is taking that market away, is wine... You want to compete with wine, you need to maybe look at what wine does well that beer does badly. And guess what? Its partly to do with all the obfuscating and self agrandisement. Wine is very very good at telling all and sundy that it is special and making them believe it. Beer tends to suck at it, and when someone tries... They get shit canned by the people who should be applaudng.

Making expensive "super premium" style beers isn't the only way make beer special, you can drive it form the bottom up by convincing people that even normal beer is special too, look at the way Camra has handled it in the UK - but if you want wanky beer speak to rival anything that the wine world has to offer, you dont have to look much further than camra. But winning places at the high end table is important too if beer supposed to hold its own against wine in the overall booze market.

$25 stubbies in fancy bottles might not be your idea of what beer should be, but then again, for the vast majority of Australians (and the rest of the world too) neither is an IPA, a Pale Ale or an Imperial Stout of any description. For most of them, they feel the same way about a $25 six pack of craft beer, that some people seem to feel about a $25 stubbie.
 

eamonnfoley

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Why would you not charge $25 a stubby if you knew you were able to sell it for that much? Don't you like money?

I have heard and read some very good, very convincing arguments to the tune that one of the reasons beer does not and cannot command the same respect and position on beverage lists in restaurants across the world as wine is that it is simply not expensive enough - not special enough. Beer is "ordinary" and no one wants ordinary on their wine list.

So, when someone makes a special beer, puts it in a special bottle and charges a special price for it, they are actually helping to rectify the situation that so many beer lovers complain about - and yet the brewers that do it will be virtually unable to sell their beer to that same set of beer lovers... Because they want to have their cake and eat it too, they want beer to be as special as wine, as respected as wine, to sit in its deserved place on the crisp white table cloth next to the $100 bottle of plonk... But god help you if you try to charge them the same sort of price for it as the wine! "Its only a beer after all"
Could half understand $25 a stubby in a posh restaurant after a 300% mark up. But from the brewery at $25 a stubby? They are having a serious laugh. I love beer and have the cash, but dont pay those sorts of prices on principle.
 

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