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The NEIPA thread

Discussion in 'All Grain Brewing' started by devoutharpist, 4/8/19.

 

  1. fdsaasdf

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    Posted 21/10/19
    Did you record which hops you used, did they particularly high co-humulone?
     
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  2. Schikitar

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    Posted 21/10/19
    I used Azacca, Mosaic, Idaho 7 and Galaxy - I didn't really look at their co-humulone levels, I think they average out to be somewhere in the middle of the range. The only reason I haven't included my own hop schedule here is because I didn't nail that part of it, I would happily encourage anyone to try the malt bill but formulate your own hop schedules and come back to us!
     
  3. devoutharpist

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    Posted 25/10/19
    Harvesting appears to be a success... pending any accidental infection surprises. Gonna try and see if i can spin up a starter before Sunday, pray to the flocculant gods. If all goes to plan, then hopefully i can brew up my next NEIPA.

    Edit: I definitely need to work on my washing though... waited too long to pour it off. Such inconsistent slurry volumes.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: 25/10/19
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  4. Truman42

    Pro Pro

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    Posted 25/10/19
    My first NEIPA with Kveiking turned out really good. I was very happy with it.

    72AFA71F-6B7D-4504-9F50-B1292AE19B90-1.JPG
     
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  5. devoutharpist

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    Posted 25/10/19
    That one looks great too, how did you find the Kveik?

    Guess i'll post the recipe i'm doing next:

    Target OG: 1.065
    Target FG: 1.018 (but i assume it'll hit a few points lower)
    24.6L batch size, expecting some heavy losses along the way due to the large amount of hops. Hoping to get 19L into the keg and then adjust for future batches.

    76% Pale malt
    14.6% Wheat malt
    6.8% Rolled oats
    2.7% Rice hulls for insurance

    20g Warrior @ 60min for some bitterness

    Whirlpool with 56g each of Citra, Simcoe and Idaho 7
    One dry hop at "high krausen" of the same, 56g of each

    Using the harvested 1318. Water roughly 62 Calcium, 137 Chloride, 82 Sulphate.

    Only doing the one dry hop in an attempt to limit oxygen, then once it's done a cold crash under pressure and closed transfer to keg. Hoping i can get it into the keg within 14 days.
     
  6. Truman42

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    Posted 25/10/19
    Well I fermented at 33C and had no off flavours etc. Had a nice tropical fruit flavour to the finished beer. My son said "Too fruity for me.."
     
  7. Schikitar

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    Posted 25/10/19
    There are some interesting nuggets in this Beersmith podcast with IPA king Mitch Steele, might be of interest to some of you..
     
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  8. devoutharpist

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    Posted 1/11/19
    This one went into the fermenter last night, checked this morning (10 hours later) and we have activity. Undershot my volume and my gravity and had some poor mash efficiency, but hopefully i should still get close to what i was after. For some reason the Guten had a lot of issues keeping mash temp and kept overshooting by a couple of C which i haven't had before, despite running at only 800w.

    Now to watch until i can conclude we are at high krausen and it is time for the big dry hop.

    What sort of timeframe are people turning these around in? I see a lot of stuff on other forums about people going grain to glass in under 14 days? Assumedly because they can and also to maximise the hop characters before they begin to fade.
     
  9. goatchop41

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    Posted 1/11/19
    Mine are usually about a week...
    Dry hop #1 when I pitch the yeast, then usually hit FG by day 4. Add 2nd dry hop somewhere from day 3-5 (depends on how busy I am) then cold crash from day 4-5 and keg at ~day 7
     
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  10. devoutharpist

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    Posted 1/11/19
    damn thats real quick. has that timeline ever given you any issues with hop creep/diacetyl?
     
  11. fdsaasdf

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    Posted 2/11/19
    US-05 (out of convenience, still hazy enough but not the juciest), Vermont ale, Burlington Ale and London Fog I've not had a NEIPA spend more than 10 days between yeast pitch and kegging to serve.

    I always dry hop with yeast pitch, and if I dry hop again it's within 48hrs but I'm often not home during the week to do this. Usually at FG by day 4, after 2 days at FG I'll drop the temp for 1-2 days and keg (CO2 purged) with a slow carb - I don't shake the keg while force carbing hop-forward beers in an effort to avoid scrubbing hop aroma.
     
  12. Schikitar

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    Posted 2/11/19
    I wouldn't be avoiding that diacetyl rest personally but hey, if it's working without complaints then you're golden (pun intended).

    I have a minimum 10 day turn around on all my brews; 4 day ferment (19c), 2 day diacetyl rest (22c), 2 day dry hop (14c), 2 day cold crash (~0c).. sometimes I lengthen the dry hop or cold crash depending on the timing or what's going on with the brew..
     
  13. goatchop41

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    Posted 2/11/19
    It's an ale, being fermented at ale temps. Therefore the entirety of the later stages of fermentation is essentially your diacetyl rest, isn't it?
     
  14. devoutharpist

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    Posted 2/11/19
    I guess my issue is i have been burnt by diacetyl before so now i am hyper paranoid... but that was due to loss of temperature control during the ferment.
     
  15. goatchop41

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    Posted 3/11/19
    So that's not really any reason to be paranoid then, is it? If you know that it was to do with temp control, then that should have no bearing on your procedure with dry hopping, ferment time, etc.
     
  16. Schikitar

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    Posted 3/11/19
    Smarter people than me can answer that but I think it's pretty standard to give the yeast a couple days after reaching FG at a slightly higher temp to allow them to clean up after themselves.. that said, if you're not having any problems then I'm not going to tell you to do anything different, it's just something I do just as insurance, not fussed about a couple extra days..
     
  17. goatchop41

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    Posted 3/11/19
    It is standard to do that in homebrewing, but that's because a lot of homebrewers treat their yeast sub-optimally.
    Pitching the correct amount of cells, having plenty of nutrients and ramping the temperature in the later stages of fermentation should keep the yeast very happy, meaning that not only do you get minimal amounts of VDKs, but you also don't need to give extra time for them to be cleaned up (I believe that the clean up will just happen during the end stages of fermentation with healthy, happy yeast)
     
  18. devoutharpist

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    Posted 14/11/19 at 5:36 AM
    So, just poured a pint from my latest batch (simcoe, idaho 7, citra). Gotta say i am pretty happy with it, probably one of the best beers i have made. Cheers to everyone who has contributed to the thread so far. If only i could find lighting that did the beer justice....

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Schikitar

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    Posted 14/11/19 at 8:17 AM
    Lookin' good dude, makes me thirsty! :cheers:

    My NEIPA has almost left the keg :'( time to get my brew hat on again :) going to base it off my NEIPA recipe but scale and tweak into a NZ-hopped Hazy Pale..

    Brew Name: Hazy Hort Pale
    Batch Size: 25 liters (fermentor volume)
    Boil Size: 29 liters
    Boil Gravity: 1.040
    Efficiency: 75% (brew house)
    Original Gravity: 1.047
    Final Gravity: 1.009
    ABV (standard): 4.95%
    IBU (tinseth): 22.93 (it'll be more than this in reality)
    SRM (morey): 5.17
    Mash pH: 5.41 (gotta tweak this a little)

    FERMENTABLES:
    2 kg - Maris Otter Pale (38.8%)
    2 kg - Pilsner Malt (38.8%)
    500 g - Toffee Malt (9.7%)
    225 g - Rolled Oats (4.4%)
    225 g - Wheat Malt (4.4%)
    200 g - Caramalt 15L (3.9%)

    HOPS:
    15 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Boil for 15 min, IBU: 9.96
    10 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Boil for 10 min, IBU: 4.41
    15 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 4
    15 g - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Boil for 5 min, IBU: 4.55
    75 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Whirlpool for 45 min at 76 °C
    45 g - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Whirlpool for 45 min at 76 °C
    55 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Dry Hop for 8 days
    35 g - Hort 4337, Type: Pellet, AA: 11, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days
    40 g - Nelson Sauvin, Type: Pellet, AA: 12.5, Use: Dry Hop for 3 days

    MASH GUIDELINES:
    1) Infusion, Temp: 66 C, Time: 60 min, Amount: 29 L, Mashin @ 69
    2) Infusion, Temp: 78 C, Time: 10 min, Amount: 27 L, Mashout

    OTHER INGREDIENTS:
    12 g - Calcium Chloride (dihydrate), Time: 60 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Mash
    1 each - Whirlfloc, Time: 10 min, Type: Water Agt, Use: Boil
    4 g - Yeast Nutrient, Time: 10 min, Type: Other, Use: Boil

    YEAST:
    White Labs - London Fog Ale Yeast WLP066 (was going to go with S-04 but still have a couple jars of this leftover from the NEIPA's)
     

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