Lager question

Discussion in 'General Recipe Discussion' started by Doctormcbrewdle, 4/11/17.

 

  1. Doctormcbrewdle

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    Posted 29/11/17
    Well, I won't say it's 'ready' yet but it's clear and carbed just 5 days in the bottle. It's the best pils I've done yet! Still a tiny bit too tasty to be a megaswill Bali Bintang but definitely a complete winner. Next up I'll use 10% sucrose with the ale malt and see how she goes. It should also help add a little colour too, pils malt is very light, it physically looks like a Corona

    Looking forward to conditioning this one
     
  2. Doctormcbrewdle

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Well it's been in the bottle a few weeks now and is the best I've ever done! Really like this one. Its just so on the mark. Bitterness is just right and flavour is dead-on. I think mashing at 64 has made a great difference so cheers for the heads up on that once again

    I'm also finding lately it's hard to beat a really simple grain bill too. Just pils for this one and my pale ale's and IPA's are improving the less specialty malts I use too
     
  3. Lyrebird_Cycles

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    Posted 7/12/17
    In French, fining is "collage", the word also means "gluing". The basic action is to bind together small particles so that the agglomeration becomes large enough to sediment out.

    It can be argued that since PVPP is itself large enough to sediment out that its action can be technically described as that of an adsorbent but it's still a form of fining. The same is true of many other forms of fining eg the casein in skim milk denatures instantly at wine pH but it's still a fining.

    Legally the addition of any additive or process aid whose purpose is to aid clarification is fining.
     
    Last edited: 7/12/17
  4. MHB

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Its an opinion that has been much discussed, I'm not sure what you mean by legally but the definition I find most useful refers to agents that cause small particles to flock and settle out faster (see stokes law)
    PVPP and a bunch of other products are called process aids. I know wine makers use a much boarder definition of what a fining is, and quite a few products that we don't/wont use in brewing (bentonite, milk, blood, egg white...)
    I recall having this conversation several years ago, someone opined that if you added a shedload of SO2, the yeast would all fall out - so SO2 would be a fining in that case.
    Mark
     
  5. Lyrebird_Cycles

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    Posted 7/12/17
    Exactly: an additive is defined by its function, not by its mode of action.

    You are right that usage is a bit broader in wine: I am currently looking at fining trials in my '17 chardonnays and it will make SFA difference to clarity after they are cross flowed through 0.2 micron membranes. What I'm after is flavour / phenolic balance.
     
    Last edited: 7/12/17

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