Kettle Shaking Uncontrollably

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fletcher

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hey all,

i'm about to start BIAB and wanted to check on how fast my stove top could heat up 18 litres of water in my new pot. i filled up the pot and turned on the stove (it's an electric glass-top stove) and within thirty seconds the pot began slowly shaking. after the water had heated up more it began violently shaking.

i'm guessing it was the convection of the water moving about, and the bottom of the pot not being perfectly straight and not flush on the stove top that did it. question is, is there any way to fix it so it doesn't rattle? 18 heavy litres on a glass stove top rattling about splashing boiling water/wort all over the place isn't conducive to making beer :(

the pot is stainless steel but the base of it seems quite thin.

any ideas?
 

real_beer

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hey all,

i'm about to start BIAB and wanted to check on how fast my stove top could heat up 18 litres of water in my new pot. i filled up the pot and turned on the stove (it's an electric glass-top stove) and within thirty seconds the pot began slowly shaking. after the water had heated up more it began violently shaking.

i'm guessing it was the convection of the water moving about, and the bottom of the pot not being perfectly straight and not flush on the stove top that did it. question is, is there any way to fix it so it doesn't rattle? 18 heavy litres on a glass stove top rattling about splashing boiling water/wort all over the place isn't conducive to making beer :(

the pot is stainless steel but the base of it seems quite thin.

any ideas?
Is there any water getting trapped underneath from a pinhole leak & turning to steam?
 

Truman42

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I'm guessing its a convection hot plate especially as its glass. The vibrations are probably caused by the bottom of the pot being bent and not making good contact with the convection coils underneath.

The only way to fix it would be to straighten out the bottom to make it flatter
 

fletcher

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I'm guessing its a convection hot plate especially as its glass. The vibrations are probably caused by the bottom of the pot being bent and not making good contact with the convection coils underneath.

The only way to fix it would be to straighten out the bottom to make it flatter
yeah you're spot on i think mate. i have zero idea about how to make it flatter. it's literally out of the box, but even tapping on it i can feel that the bottom is just as thin as the sides. any ideas on how to make it flatter?

fml.
 

real_beer

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yeah you're spot on i think mate. i have zero idea about how to make it flatter. it's literally out of the box, but even tapping on it i can feel that the bottom is just as thin as the sides. any ideas on how to make it flatter?

fml.
You might be best buying an element like this http://www.craftbrewer.com.au/shop/details.asp?PID=3853 or invest in a thicker based better quality pot for the stove. There's a good chance you'll just ruin the pot trying to flatten it. :icon_cheers:
 

fletcher

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You might be best buying an element like this http://www.craftbrewer.com.au/shop/details.asp?PID=3853 or invest in a thicker based better quality pot for the stove. There's a good chance you'll just ruin the pot trying to flatten it. :icon_cheers:
very true haha. that seems like a decent cheaper option (the element). i guess they can also be used by just dropping it in the top of the pot right? or must they be inserted in with drilling a hole etc?

i'll have to price up some other pots too but i'm scared the same thing will happen.
 

Thefatdoghead

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hey all,

i'm about to start BIAB and wanted to check on how fast my stove top could heat up 18 litres of water in my new pot. i filled up the pot and turned on the stove (it's an electric glass-top stove) and within thirty seconds the pot began slowly shaking. after the water had heated up more it began violently shaking.

i'm guessing it was the convection of the water moving about, and the bottom of the pot not being perfectly straight and not flush on the stove top that did it. question is, is there any way to fix it so it doesn't rattle? 18 heavy litres on a glass stove top rattling about splashing boiling water/wort all over the place isn't conducive to making beer :(

the pot is stainless steel but the base of it seems quite thin.

any ideas?
My guess is you need to grow a brain? I mean how stupid is your question? Its called energy gahhhh the stupidness.
 

fletcher

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My guess is you need to grow a brain? I mean how stupid is your question? Its called energy gahhhh the stupidness.

i know WHAT caused it. i asked if anyone knew if it could be fixed or had ideas. no need to be a dickhead, honestly. if you can't help, or don't want to, shut your cake hole.
 

Punkal

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I use 2 of those elements in my 50L kettle. On will hold a nice (ish) boil and 2 gives me a good rolling boil. Used with a smaller volume it should work good.

You will need a 32mm hole saw, they are cheap online but I got a good one from a hardware store and it rips through stainless no problems.

Good luck... Obviously you have a brain you did a wet run and didn't just jump right in and make a real mess.
 

fletcher

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cheers for the info punkal :)

i just ended up just taking it off the stove top, potof4x, it wouldn't stop. was pretty funny to look at to be honest. picture beer making mixed with the exorcist :)
 

Beerisyummy

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cheers for the info punkal :)

i just ended up just taking it off the stove top, potof4x, it wouldn't stop. was pretty funny to look at to be honest. picture beer making mixed with the exorcist :)
Are you sure it's not an induction cooktop mate? They can do some pretty crazy things if the incorrect cookware is used. Over the years I've had plenty of clients get them installed and then freak out at the cost of replacing all their cookware.
Surry Hills. Glass top. It's not totally uncommon to have a wizz bang induction top installed.

As for sorting out the pot so it sits flat, I have used the phone book treatment in the past. You don't really need a phone book but you will need something to use as a buffer so you don't impart too much force all in one spot. Flip the pot upside down on a flat surface, place a phone book on top and give it a good solid whack in the middle. You should get a slight hollow in the middle that'll allow the pot to sit on the outer edge and stay stable.
Most of the thin bottom pots I looked at have a raised section in the middle as part of the pressing. All the weight sits on a ring around the outer edge during use and stops them from wandering about.
A much simpler solution than buying an element and drilling out the pot.

PS. I just noticed the "grow a brain" comment. Very helpful (even if it was meant to be tongue in cheek).

HTH.

Ross.
 

beerdrinkingbob

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I have no idea why no one has mentioned it but it's the type of base that is the issue.....

Snip
Induction cooking uses induction heating to directly heat a cooking vessel, as opposed to using heat transfer from electrical coils or burning gas as with a traditional cooking stove. For nearly all models of induction cooktop, a cooking vessel must be made of a ferromagnetic metal, or placed on an interface disk which enables non-induction cookware to be used on induction cooking surfaces.

In an induction cooker, a coil of copper wire is placed underneath the cooking pot. An alternating electric current flows through the coil, which produces an oscillating magnetic field. This field induces an electric current in the pot. Current flowing in the metal pot produces resistive heating which heats the food. While the current is large, it is produced by a low voltage.

An induction cooker is faster and more energy-efficient than a traditional electric cooking surface. It allows instant control of cooking energy similar to gas burners. Other cooking methods use flames or red-hot heating elements; induction heating only heats the pot. Because the surface of the cook top is only heated from contact with the vessel, the possibility of burn injury is significantly less than with other methods. The induction effect does not heat the air around the vessel, resulting in further energy efficiencies. Cooling air is blown through the electronics but emerges only a little warmer than ambient temperature.

The magnetic properties of a steel vessel concentrate the induced current in a thin layer near its surface, which makes the heating effect stronger. In non-magnetic materials like aluminum, the magnetic field penetrates too far, and the induced current encounters little resistance in the metal.[1] At least one high-frequency cooker is available, that works with lower efficiency on non-ferrous cookware.
 

Truman42

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yeah you're spot on i think mate. i have zero idea about how to make it flatter. it's literally out of the box, but even tapping on it i can feel that the bottom is just as thin as the sides. any ideas on how to make it flatter?

fml.
I missed that part where you said the pot was new. You could try putting it on a smaller element which doesn't cover the enitre pots surface and therefore the area in contact with the pot is nice and flat. Thats assuming your pot is flatter in the middle than towrds the edges. But then you might not get enough power to boil the water. If that doesnt work then you will have to ditch it for another pot.

Are you sure the bottom of the pot is stainless? Sometimes the sides can be stainless but the bottom a sandwich of stainless and aluminium. That can cause all sorts of problems with convection hotplates which won't work with aluminium bases.

My guess is you need to grow a brain? I mean how stupid is your question? Its called energy gahhhh the stupidness.
@GAV80...What sort of answer is that. He obviously knows whats causing the vibrations, he wanted to know how he can fix it.
How stupid was your answer???
Maybe you should read the question properly and either come up with a helpful reply or dont reply at all.
 

GalBrew

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hey all,

i'm about to start BIAB and wanted to check on how fast my stove top could heat up 18 litres of water in my new pot. i filled up the pot and turned on the stove (it's an electric glass-top stove) and within thirty seconds the pot began slowly shaking. after the water had heated up more it began violently shaking.

i'm guessing it was the convection of the water moving about, and the bottom of the pot not being perfectly straight and not flush on the stove top that did it. question is, is there any way to fix it so it doesn't rattle? 18 heavy litres on a glass stove top rattling about splashing boiling water/wort all over the place isn't conducive to making beer :(

the pot is stainless steel but the base of it seems quite thin.

any ideas?
The exact same thing happened to me on a ceramic cooktop with a cheap stainless pot. The solution is quite simple really. To prevent the pot from shaking you have to hear the water/wort at a slower rate. If you turn the element down to about 3/4 it should be fine. It used to take me an hour to get 14L to strike temp, but it worked. For your boil you need to do the same but once you get past a couple of wobbles you can turn the element up to full.
 

yum beer

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Souns like a Big W stainless pot, I have one and its does the same thing sometimes if it doesnt have much liquid in it, the problem goes away once there is

a decent amount in it, or by pushing down on the pot once its on the stove to force the middle to concave.

If it doesnt stop shaking then take it back and swap it, the pot is for cooking not dancing.
 

Beerisyummy

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I have no idea why no one has mentioned it but it's the type of base that is the issue.....
Even the OP stated that in the first post.

The reason I mentioned induction cooktops (along with a way to solve the bottom of the pot) is that they can make thin steel rattle. Thin stainless pots are great for this.
 

Truman42

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Even the OP stated that in the first post.

The reason I mentioned induction cooktops (along with a way to solve the bottom of the pot) is that they can make thin steel rattle. Thin stainless pots are great for this.

+1.. Yeh sorry I meant to say induction cook top as well not convection.
 

Beerisyummy

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+1.. Yeh sorry I meant to say induction cook top as well not convection.
No probs. I don't think he's got an induction top anyway, but it might explain rattling of a full pot of water holding a steady boil if it turns out not to be the base.

Edit:
Just as an experiment for the OP. Place the empty pot over a hot plate and turn it on.
Does it vibrate?

If not let it heat up for a bit and see how much the bottom domes downwards when the metal gets a bit of heat in it. If you can get that dome to go upwards the pot will work just fine.

OT. Has anyone used one of these yet? http://www.breville.com.au/cooking/hot-pla...quick-time.html
I've got a few vouchers to spend and the idea of a temperature controlled and timed hotplate would make small scale BIAB pretty simple.
 
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