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Dry Hopping Question

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RichLum

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Hi guys,

I'm going to dry hop the brew I have in the fermenter at the moment after 3 days or so.

I've always just added my hops at the same time as mixing up the K&Bs and then left it till it was ready to bottle.

When I add the hops should I just chuck them in and leave them or stir them around a bit to try and distribute them a bit more evenly through the beer?

thanks,
Rich
 

sluggerdog

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What I would do is make a hop tea (hops in boiling water for about 10 minutes in a mug) then throw this on top of the wort, don't worry about mixing it all up.
 

RichLum

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I do the hop tea thing when I add my hops to the wort at the beginning before adding the yeast.
Is that still "dry" hopping though?
 

Justin

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STOOOOOOPPPPP! Dont do it :eek: :unsure: :huh:

I personally hate dry hopping. (Ducks, weaves, parries, blocks from dry hopping lovers :p) But that's my opinon and tastes, each to their own.

Good luck though, hope you like it. I've tried dry hopping and just thought it tasted like grass (nothing like the taste of heaps of late addition hops at flame out) and in my opinion I destroyed what was turning out to be a very nice lager. So from now on for me it is either late boil additions, use of a hop back (if I ever get around to making one) or nothing. No more dry hopping for me.

But if I had to recommend (well not really a recommendation as I haven't done much of this at all, as per above) a way it would be the hop tea mentioned by sluggerdog just be very cautious with the amounts at first, just in case you don't like it-hopefully you'll be left with something you can still drink.

Not meaning to turn you off, you have to give it a go to see if you like it and this is all part of the hobby, just my advice is start off with small amounts.

Cheers and good luck, Justin
 

RichLum

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Thanks.
I put 15g Cascade into a Coopers Pale Ale kit with 1kg malt and am planning on adding another 15g Cascade at day 3 or so.

Doesn't that seem about right?



thanks,
Rich
 
W

waggabrewers

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Definately use a HOP TEA as suggested, the reason behind this is simple. A wort gathers alcohol during the course of fermentation, there is usually not enough alcohol to fight off infection in your wort untill it is fully fermented (primary).
So you cant be 100% sure that your hops has no infection, bug or furry little creatures lurking inside ready to pounce onto you lovely fresh Wort.

Peter
 

sluggerdog

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OK As justin has mentioned about the grassy flavour, I found this too when I first dry hopped... however since then I have found it only seems to happen when I use saaz.

Every other hop I have used it has come out nicely.

Maybe putting in 15 grams at the start and then 15 grams a little later might be a bit too much.

I would suggest you dry hop with only 10 - 15 grams total (10 being saaz)
 

Bobby

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i reckon you will be fine without adding the second lot of hops.
see how this brew goes then you will know if it need something more.
 

quincy

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I personally hate dry hopping. (Ducks, weaves, parries, blocks from dry hopping lovers ) But that's my opinon and tastes, each to their own.
Like most brew related things, its all about your taste and preferences (unless you are brewing for comps etc and need to stay within guidelines !!).
I say do what you feel is going to be best and if the end product is not what you expect, play around til its right.
FWIW, when I keg the fresh wort pils, I steep 20g of saaz for about 10mins and drop that in the bottom of the keg and rack away. Perfect for my taste.

Cheers
 

RichLum

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All my other beers I've added 24 - 30 gms hops when mixing up the kit and malt/grains.

15gm doesn't seem like much to me...

I've only used Kent Goldings up til now though.
This is my first time with Cascade.

But I'll do the hop tea thing to kill any bugs... I though "dry hopping" was just chucking them in dry

Good thing I checked with you guys :)

Rich
 

Snow

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sluggerdog said:
What I would do is make a hop tea (hops in boiling water for about 10 minutes in a mug) then throw this on top of the wort, don't worry about mixing it all up.
Hang on - if you're going to boil the hops for 10 mins, then that defeats the whole purpose of dry hopping, which is to have the freshest aromas that aren't driven off by fermentatin heat. Boiling them just volatalises the aroma oils, which is not what you want. If you do dry hop, just throw them in to secondary and rack the beer on top of them. They have natural antiseptic properties which will prevent infection. Just bear this in mind - the majority of present and historical commercial brewers do not and did not dry hop their beers. I'm sure there's a reason......

- Snow
 

Sean

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For interest/comparison's sake, the most common dry-hop rate in UK beers (those that are dry hopped) is one 14g plug in each firkin (9 gallon cask).

Of course a few beers have way more than that (eg Fullers ESB), and the level of effect depends hugely on how fresh or mature the cask is - a cask of ESB or Adnams Tally Ho! that's been sitting around for 6 or 12 months is on another level to the fresh product. Similarly in shorter time for a lighter beer. The inconsistency that dry hopping gives is the main reason many UK brewers avoid it.

Hang on - if you're going to boil the hops for 10 mins, then that defeats the whole purpose of dry hopping,.
I'd agree entirely.
 

sluggerdog

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^ I didn't mean boil the hops for 10 minutes more like have some boiling water in a mug then add the hops so they soak for 10 minutes...

hope that clears it up.
 

RichLum

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Now I'm confused.... :blink:

I originally just thought I wasn't sure whether to stir or not, now I'mnot sure whether to use "dry" or steeped....

The reason I was told to dry hop was for the aroma as a lot will go out during primary fermentation.

Dry hopping after the main active fermentation will mean more hop aroma is maintained by the beer...
 

sluggerdog

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I say go for it.

Dry hop 10-15 grams in secondary and don't worry about stiring.

better yet, place the hops on the bottom of your second fermentor and then rack the wort on top just as you would while bulk priming, this will ensure you get the hops mixed in.
 

Backlane Brewery

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you know, reading this kind of thread just makes it clear that there are a number of ways of doing this whole HB thang:

tick yr box below...

A- homebrewing is an overrated hobby infested by "experts" & myths
B- homebrewing is an excellent hobby, if you keep it as a hobby
C- homebrewing is a great way to brew the beer you like, the way that works for you.

RichLum, you seem more confused than when you posted the original question.
At the risk of adding to the problem- add flavor hops in the boil (if you do one) OR steep flavor hops & add to primary, OR steep & add aroma hops in secondary OR add dry aroma hops to secondary.

And at all times be aware it will take at least a month of fermentation & maturation before you can tell which gives the best result.

ps the correctest answer is C
 

Sean

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Dry hopping isn't just to avoid loss of aroma during fermentation, you actually get a different aroma from hops added cold than you can from hops added to hot wort. You can get very hop-aromatic beers by putting lots of hops in at the end of boil or in the hop back (eg Adnams' Extra), but it's not the same aroma. If you steep in hot water, you should get a good effect, but it'll be different to 'true' dry-hopping. You pays your money and takes your choice.
 

RichLum

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Well now I have a bit more to think about.
Goes to show I didn't put all that much thought into it in the first place...

I think I'll just chuck the 15g into the fermenter (don't have a secondary to rack to) and leave till it's ready to bottle.
Won't stir to recude chance of oxygenation and try and just scatter them evenly over surface.

[fingers crossed]

thanks all for the various points of view.
It's all learning and experience :)

Rich
 

Backlane Brewery

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I think I'll just chuck the 15g into the fermenter (don't have a secondary to rack to) and leave till it's ready to bottle.
Won't stir to recude chance of oxygenation and try and just scatter them evenly over surface.
good on you- it'll probably work just as well. Suck it & see, as they say in the UK.
Or, as Papazian says- "Relax, have a home brew".
We all (even the AG 3 tier SS HERMS boys) have to wing it occasionally.
 
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