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Boiled The Mash Momentarily

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tlbeer

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Hi fellow brewers,


Had a slight problem occur today where the mash started to boil. I have just purchased a Stokes Immersion Heating Element to make a Mash Out possible in a Willow Esky that is set up with a perforated stainless false bottom. Problem was I got sidetracked and came back within about 5 minutes to find the mash boiling but only in the middle of the esky directly above where the element was located in the mash (As I was not there to move the element around through the mash). I reduced the temp back quickly to around 80 but the temp rose to about 95C peak on my built in thermometer for about 2 minutes thereafter. Has anyone experienced a similar happening and/or what is your view on this? Will my brew turn out alright still?
 

Helles

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NO
but i read some where about boiling the mash with hops then running off
Instead of boiling the wort with hops`After run off
Pretty sure it was for a Berliner weisse
I dont remember any more than this
I think it was in BYO (Brew Your Own Magazine)

ALMOST A HIJACK
BUT STILL ON TOPIC( Could use its own topic if anyone knows anything)

Does any one know any more
Im very interested in anyone or anything that involves boiling the mash with hops
As i cant find anything that is on the subject anymore
BYO mentioned it but i cant find it
 

felten

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:icon_offtopic: helles: you mean a decoction?
 

Wolfy

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Has anyone experienced a similar happening and/or what is your view on this? Will my brew turn out alright still?
The important enzymes required to convert starch to sugar can be denatured (or destroyed) at higher temperatures, the process is not instant, and it would also require the entire mash's temperate to be raised 'too high'. If you did that at the start, or in the middle of the mash process, it's probable that you might have some problems, however (if I read correctly) raising the temperature 'too high' during mash-out is not such a big issue (one of the reasons for performing the mash-out step is to denature the enzymes). Higher (than normal) mash-out (and sparge) temperatures can cause some problems (such as leeching tanins) but if your mash/sparge pH is reasonable, the higher mash-out temperature is not likely to have caused too many problems.
 

Kleiny

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As wolfy said but the denaturing of enzymes although not instant would begin from a much earlier temperature alpha and beta enzymes as we all know work in a low optimal temperature range 50c-70. Alpha amylase will start to denature first even within the optimal range of Beta amylase but both will continue to denature outside this range. In most texts it will talk about tannins being leached / extracted from the husks of the grain at temperatures higher than 80c. This is why the mash out step is usually above 70c but below 80c and why we boil after sparge to remove the grist including the husk material.

With all that said it depends on where in the mash process you came to over 80c mark and for how long, if its early in the mash cycle the denaturing of enzymes may of affected your mash time and you would of had to mash longer for full conversion. If it happened later then it is closer to mash out but also with some tannin extraction. You may or may not taste this in your finished beer only time will tell. You may get tannin type astringency, the beer may have a fuller mouth feel, finish at a higher gravity and contain more un-fermented sugars.

See how it goes
Kleiny
 

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