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At last, a hobby that saves money!

Aussie Home Brewer

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mongey

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It def saves money ,dependent on what you like to drink

I can brew 23l of pretty decent saison ,Belgian ale or tripel for $40 of ingredients,cheaper if I bulk buy, and about $6 worth of a gas bottle . with cleaning products and such lets round up to $50

a 750ml of a good any belgian will cost at least $18 and up

yeah theres set up costs but unless you want to go down the gear rabbit hole then that's a one off cost. I spent $450 for a pot and a high pressure burner and just did my 38th batch with it . so at 45 batches thats only $10 a batch for gear then it gets cheaper


I agree tine doesn't count. I enjoy the process and its at a point now now where i can just set a timer and come and go as I need to and do other things
 

philrob

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Actually, I'm saving money. All my equipment has been amortized for years. I'm using the same gear I had ten+ years ago. I'm not into the latest new flashy piece of stainless steel. Last gimmick I bought was an auto-siphon which ended up in the trash ten minutes after I first used it.

All I'm paying for is ingredients, power, and water. Time doesn't count because it's pleasant time, not work.
I'm with you. I started AG brewing 13 years ago, and haven't spent big on equipment since then, so it's more than earned it's keep. I reckon I'm averaging about $1.50 a longneck for beer I really want to drink, rather than what's on tap at my golf club. And a side benefit is there are never any complaints from SWMBO about expenditure on beer, considering she is a non-drinker.
 

DarrenTheDrunk

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Love the joke, homebrewing would have to be the most expensive way to save money that I know of. Saying that I can't get the flavours and satisfaction from any commercial beer that I can from my home brew.

Maybe I am a bit thick but to suggest, imply or even elude to the point that home brewing does NOT save you money makes me think you are may have put this post up after you had been on the juice for a while...it saves a bloody fortune, is great fun and you have TOTAL control over the types of flavors you like as well as the Alcohol % WTF more could you ever want.
 

yankinoz

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Whether you save money depends on what you brew, equipment and volume (i.e. depreciation), energy, current FOREX rates on imported supplies, yeast costs, shipping charges if any, incidentals such as sanitizers and cleaners, and more. I suspect most home brewers underestimate total costs.

Brew Rivet clones in a Braumeister keg, consume in moderation, and you'll never get back the cost of your equipment. Brew top of the line Belgians, assuming you think yours is as good as theirs, BIAB, bottle, guzzle mass quantities along with your friends, and you'll soon amortise your fixed costs.

A lot of brewers on this forum have expensive equipment, but also brew 500-1000L/year (there was a poll a while back), and do a wide variety including high abv beers that Australian tax rates make very expensive to buy at Dan Murphy's. Offhand I'd guess many come out ahead after quite a few years.

I brew a variety of beers, about half of them American ales, BIAB, bottle and brew about 22L a month. I've estimated all costs and come out well ahead. Hops are a highly variable part of marginal costs and also soak up wort or beer, so saisons and English brown ales are relatively inexpensive, NEIPAs costly.
 

Vini2ton

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Brewing your own saves a huge amount of cash. I just use cheap gear BIAB and I've have saved a poltice of money of which I use in my book-makers benevolent fund. What was a game-changer in the moola saving was giving up the gaspers years ago. Just saying gaspers makes me long for the pass-port to smoking pleasure. I loved those bloody things, shame they cost so much and kill you in the long run.
 

Dingerb

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Hi guys,

Read this thread and was amused by the "hobby that saves you money"
Got me thinking.
Yes in a way you do save money if you look at it merely as cost per pint.

For example, a 5 UK gallon brew of a 4.5%abv beer costs around 38p per pint or just over £15 for 5 gallons, using the cost of the ingredients only.
In the pub, that same amount of beer would cost in the region of £140. And that is in a cheap pub. City centre pubs cost even more.

My brewing has cost me a few quid over the years. A new shed specifically for brewing. I did get some free second hand kit. I'm on my second free fridge being used as a fermentation chamber. I made my own immersion chiller with bits from the local DIY shop. I made my own mash tun by converting a picnic cool box.
I used the elements from two £5 kettles to make my own hlt. I've also built my own stir plate from old computer parts.

I've invested in a refractometer, several corny kegs, I've got a soda stream kit to put Co2 into my kegs, and a beer engine for pouring.

By looking after your kit it should last you years. Mine has.

My brewery is complete.
I now only have to purchase ingredients, gas for my burner(19kg bottle lasts for a good couple of years), soda stream gas.

Do I save money when taking ingredients, gas, electric, and my time into account?
Probably not, but as many of you have said, the beer I get is the beer I want to drink and the added pleasure of brewing it.


Regards

Davie
 

Morgz

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You guys are all hilarious! Just ignore the equipment purchases and focus on the grain cost. Im not sure what I enjoy more, brewing or sampling my brew.
You guys are also right, my consumption has definitely gone up.
 

DarrenTheDrunk

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You guys are all hilarious! Just ignore the equipment purchases and focus on the grain cost. Im not sure what I enjoy more, brewing or sampling my brew.
You guys are also right, my consumption has definitely gone up.
spot on
As I have said, it is a "hobby with benefits", a bit like "friends with benefits" but with far less griefand no need for any explanations the following morning. The sad thing for me, which I guess is in fact a positive thing, is that purchased beer just does not "cut the mustard" for me any more. For example, I do favours for people and refused to take money (I am an accountan and business advisor) and they all know that I love a frothy more times than I should and they always buy me a slab of beer. For the first time in my life, I have to ensure that I drink the beer before it goes beyond its use by date. My preference is always for my home brew stubbies. It most certainly is a hobby to me and I thrive on the challenge of varying my brews to produce specific flavours. Think of it like growing your own vegetables or having your own egg laying chickens at home and consuming the produce. It is rewarding and again a "hobby with benefits". I am currently going through the learning curve of kegging beer and that has proved to be a challenge for me but I am ever so ably supported by another member on this forum DazGore" who has taken the learning aspect of this hobby to an extraordinarily complex and detailed level. It's all about learning like any hobby or interest.

Ok now I must go as my pint glass is approaching empty and I must do, what I must do and that is to fill the bloody thing up and haveA quiet sip. Regards to all
Darren
 

Wisey

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After giving away home brewing some time ago due to time pressures, I have started again with (so far) acceptable results.
I was told about this group by a friend and look forward to finding some new recipes and help when required.
I fell off the home brewing train in 2012, I was a biab brewer... Best beer I ever made was a Golden Ale, I remember it was wheat, barley, US 05 and galaxy hops.... I still have my corny kegs, but my fermentors are stuffed. These new conical fermentors I see look the goods and easy to clean.

Cheers
Wisey
 

GalBrew

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...OK...and may I ask what is your contribution to the topic GalBrew.
My contribution is having a chuckle at the ridiculous concept that homebrewing is a budget conscious way of enjoying your favourite beer (or any beer for that matter). If you ignore equipment costs then yes, brewing your own beer is quite cheap. However, I can tell you though from experience that it can be a very expensive hobby and if you also account for your time (and yes, the brewing part is fun but things like rebuilding your keg fridge is not) and things like the electricity it takes to run the 3 fridges in my garage, then it would be a lot cheaper to go to Uncle Dan's and buy a slab.

You seem to take exception and personal offence to everyone who disagrees with your position about the 'cheap' cost of homebrewing beer. We can't all be wrong.
 
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My fishing gear cost me far more than my brewing gear, taking up a hobby the equipment cost is a negative, ruled out by the pleasure it gives. Therefore the costs are the ingredients, is and should be the only consideration. The time can be ruled out, again another negative due to the enjoyment of the pastime.
As mentioned above, good beer, and the pleasure of the pursuit of good beer, can be achieved at a minimal outlay. If we didn't have a surplus of funds to spend on brewing gear we could all be brewing and still enjoying it in a minimalist way.
 

Baron von Rhap

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DTD has it nailed: $1 per longneck and homebrew is fun.
To paraphrase (misquote? RAHAHB) Ratty to the Mole: “Believe me, my young friend, there is nothing–absolutely nothing–half so much worth doing as simply messing about with homebrew.”.
 

DarrenTheDrunk

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spot on
As I have said, it is a "hobby with benefits", a bit like "friends with benefits" but with far less griefand no need for any explanations the following morning. The sad thing for me, which I guess is in fact a positive thing, is that purchased beer just does not "cut the mustard" for me any more. For example, I do favours for people and refused to take money (I am an accountan and business advisor) and they all know that I love a frothy more times than I should and they always buy me a slab of beer. For the first time in my life, I have to ensure that I drink the beer before it goes beyond its use by date. My preference is always for my home brew stubbies. It most certainly is a hobby to me and I thrive on the challenge of varying my brews to produce specific flavours. Think of it like growing your own vegetables or having your own egg laying chickens at home and consuming the produce. It is rewarding and again a "hobby with benefits". I am currently going through the learning curve of kegging beer and that has proved to be a challenge for me but I am ever so ably supported by another member on this forum DazGore" who has taken the learning aspect of this hobby to an extraordinarily complex and detailed level. It's all about learning like any hobby or interest.

Ok now I must go as my pint glass is approaching empty and I must do, what I must do and that is to fill the bloody thing up and haveA quiet sip. Regards to all
Darren
 

DarrenTheDrunk

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Well trendsetters – I must admit I have not been on this forum for a a few days and it is now 9:30 PM and just to prove my point beyond all reasonable doubt, I read my post above, and was about to reply to it thinking it was someone else's post. Well..... Clearly I am having a absolute ball drinking my home brew
My contribution is having a chuckle at the ridiculous concept that homebrewing is a budget conscious way of enjoying your favourite beer (or any beer for that matter). If you ignore equipment costs then yes, brewing your own beer is quite cheap. However, I can tell you though from experience that it can be a very expensive hobby and if you also account for your time (and yes, the brewing part is fun but things like rebuilding your keg fridge is not) and things like the electricity it takes to run the 3 fridges in my garage, then it would be a lot cheaper to go to Uncle Dan's and buy a slab.

You seem to take exception and personal offence to everyone who disagrees with your position about the 'cheap' cost of homebrewing beer. We can't all be wrong.
 

DarrenTheDrunk

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My contribution is having a chuckle at the ridiculous concept that homebrewing is a budget conscious way of enjoying your favourite beer (or any beer for that matter). If you ignore equipment costs then yes, brewing your own beer is quite cheap. However, I can tell you though from experience that it can be a very expensive hobby and if you also account for your time (and yes, the brewing part is fun but things like rebuilding your keg fridge is not) and things like the electricity it takes to run the 3 fridges in my garage, then it would be a lot cheaper to go to Uncle Dan's and buy a slab.

You seem to take exception and personal offence to everyone who disagrees with your position about the 'cheap' cost of homebrewing beer. We can't all be wrong.

ha Ha ha . How you could say me old mate that I seem to take exception and personal offence to everyone who disagrees with my position about the cheap cost of home brewing beer… Is in itself astonishing. I of all people most certainly do not take exception to ANYONE'S opinion at all and further, I encourage it because forums are such a great place for people with the same interests to engage with each other, and share their experiences, and learn from everybody, so with the greatest respect, I certainly don't agree with this comment of yours. I will, reiterate that whilst homebrewing most certainly is a budget conscious way of enjoying your favourite beer, to me, that pales into insignificance in that you can produce some amazing beer and, shock, horror, you can do it at an inexpensive way. I must confess that I have not read members comments before or after yours because it is nearing 10 PM, and myself and two friends are getting into one of my home brews so I need to be somewhat succinct in my reply. I can't even remember if I mentioned the fact that I was an accountant and for you to discuss issues like equipment costs and electricity and all these sort of things, to me, means you really have not understood the concept of what a hobby is. I am an avid fisherman, and I can assure you that I could buy the fish I catch, and this year, I have caught a lot, would have been so much cheaper to buy from the shop. This to me and I have no doubt the absolute majority of people on this forum is a hobby. And I know I said somewhere in previous posts, much like the old saying "friends with benefits", this is a "hobby with benefits". I just re-read one of your comments about accounting for the time you spend brewing beer, and with that comment, it clearly means, that there is nothing I can say, but please do not suggest that I am not open to other people's opinion because that comment is completely baseless.



Have a good night



Cheers and Beers Big Ears
 

butisitart

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okie, similar to paddy melon, everything went into an excel spreadsheet, and agree with darren the not entirely sober about pricing.
so, after 170 ish brews, all plant, expenses and ingredients included - grainfather, mill master, plate stirrer, crap i threw out post BIAB days, those clear jars with the yellow lids for urine samples (great for stacking yeast in the fridge), down to caps, wash cloths a tea strainer, even the labelling pen for batch id on the bottles - you name it, it's all in there. total cost of absolutely everything beer is now $14.19 carton and still falling about 8-9 cents as an across the board total with each brew. that's calulated at bottled beer quantity, converted to 24x375ml stubbies to get a price per carton.
price for brew ingredients without all the plant and equipment ranges from around $5.30 carton for a simple ale with recycled yeast to nudging $8 carton for something like a big porter. that could be a bit cheaper except that i don't scrimp on quality ingredients.
having said that, i'm now eyeing off the ss brewtech 55L fermenter with the inside chill control setup. that would put me back to about $20 carton.
but hey, what can you get from a bottle-oh for $14.19 that's worth drinking?? 2x500 ml young's london ale or 2 coopers long necks are both around $16, and there's not much else worth even mentioning.
 
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kadmium

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okie, similar to paddy melon, everything went into an excel spreadsheet, and agree with darren the not entirely sober about pricing.
so, after 170 ish brews, all plant, expenses and ingredients included - grainfather, mill master, plate stirrer, those clear jars with the yellow lids for urine samples (great for stacking yeast in the fridge), down to caps, wash cloths a tea strainer, even the labelling pen for batch id on the bottles - you name it, it's all in there. total cost of beer is now $14.19 and still falling about 8-9 cents with each brew. that's calulated at bottled beer quantity, converted to 24x375ml stubbies to get a price per carton.
price for brew ingredients without all the plant and equipment ranges from around $5.30 for a simple ale to nudging $8 carton for something like a big porter. it would be cheaper except that i don't scrimp on quality ingredients.
having said that, i'm now eyeing off the ss brewtech 55L fermenter with the inside chill setup. that'll put me back to about $20 carton.
but hey, what can you get from a bottle-oh for $5.30 that's worth drinking??
Don't mean to sound like I don't believe you, but how can a 20l batch (that's 2.5 cartons) cost you $12 - $16 in ingredients? Hops alone are $10 for 100g and then malt on top is around $3 a kilo at bulk prices? And yeast would be at LEAST $5 even if doing a started, 1 packet of liquid $15 plus $20 of DME for starters is $3.50 per batch if doing 10 generations of one strain from starters?

Then sugar for priming, sanitiser, electricity etc etc.
 

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