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Why Re-culturing Coopers Commercial Yeast?

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ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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Hey guys

This has probably been answered about a million times before but I can't find the answer.

I want to know what's the benefits of re-culturing coopers yeast? Does it taste better?

I was thinking of doing it for my next Pale Ale home brew, how many Pale Ale 375ml stubbies worth of yeast should I be reculturing for a standard 23L brew?

Does the recultivated yeast take the place of the normal Sachet of yeast found the tins of extract? Or do you use them both?




Please help I can't find an aswer to these questions only methods of how to do it.
 

.DJ.

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the benefits are that you cant buy that yeast... its the only way to get it. It is not the same as the kit yeast and will give a totally different beer...
 

Cube

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Taste. The yeast is a certain strain. You want an authentic coopers pale ale, use their yeast instead of a sachet. Beware, if you haven't got temp control forget it. From my experience brewing over 17 deg gives off a large amount of banana flavour. My first one was brewed at 20 deg and it was a banana milk shake beer.... not to my liking at all.
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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Taste. The yeast is a certain strain. You want an authentic coopers pale ale, use their yeast instead of a sachet. Beware, if you haven't got temp control forget it. From my experience brewing over 17 deg gives off a large amount of banana flavour. My first one was brewed at 20 deg and it was a banana milk shake beer.... not to my liking at all.
Thanks Mate for info.

Ok, so how much of the cultivated yeast do I need? and does this mean I do not use the kit yeast?
 

bignath

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OP:

You want an authentic coopers pale ale, use their yeast instead of a sachet.
Wont get anywhere near a CPA without the recultured yeast.
 

QldKev

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Hey guys

This has probably been answered about a million times before but I can't find the answer.

I want to know what's the benefits of re-culturing coopers yeast? Does it taste better?

It tastes 100 times better in a CPA clone

I was thinking of doing it for my next Pale Ale home brew, how many Pale Ale 375ml stubbies worth of yeast should I be reculturing for a standard 23L brew?

4 based on method Coopers released - Refer below

Does the recultivated yeast take the place of the normal Sachet of yeast found the tins of extract? Or do you use them both?


Do not use the normal yeast




Please help I can't find an aswer to these questions only methods of how to do it.

Note: I follow basically the same method, but I use LME and pour all of it into 1 larger bottle.

Coopers method for re-culturing yeasties

Coopers, encourage home brewers to use the yeast from naturally conditioned Coopers ales. There are numerous documented techniques, with varying levels of complexity, for re-activating the yeast in naturally conditioned beer. The method described below may leave some readers, experienced in growing yeast cultures, aghast. “What! No stir plate, no malt, no alcohol swabs, no nutrient, no way! However, for Coopers yeast, it works...

Method
1. Buy a six pack of Coopers Original Pale Ale and place upright in the fridge for about a week for the yeast to settle.
2. Mix about 600ml of boiling water and 4 tablespoons of dextrose/sugar in a pyrex jug, cover with cling-wrap and leave to cool in the fridge for about 30mins.
3. Open 4 bottles and decant the beer into a jug, leaving behind the yeast sediment - about a couple of centimetres.
4. Pour the sugared water equally into each bottle, cover with cling-wrap and secure with a rubber band.
5. Shake the bottles then place them in a dark spot at a temperature in the mid 20’s.
6. Give the bottles a shake in the morning and at night to keep the yeast in suspension.
7. After around 2 to 3 days the yeast should become active and begin forming a head.
8. Pitch the active yeast into a brew immediately or store in the fridge for about a week. Just remember to pull it out of the fridge to warm for couple of hours prior to pitching.

Some additional points to keep in mind;
- start with more yeast by using all 6 bottles,
- buy beer with the freshest yeast (ie. latest “Best After” date),
- lower alcohol content is better (mild ale or pale ale),
- it’s okay to hold the culture at slightly higher temps to promote a quicker reactivation,
- one sanitised vessel (approx 1 litre) may be used rather than separate bottles,
- make sure the culture smells okay before pitching,
- buy another 6 pack for each culture and
- don’t forget to drink the decanted beer




edit: Reference for the info
http://www.coopers.com.au/the-brewers-guil...osts&t=1876
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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Note: I follow basically the same method, but I use LME and pour all of it into 1 larger bottle.

Coopers method for re-culturing yeasties

Coopers, encourage home brewers to use the yeast from naturally conditioned Coopers ales. There are numerous documented techniques, with varying levels of complexity, for re-activating the yeast in naturally conditioned beer. The method described below may leave some readers, experienced in growing yeast cultures, aghast. "What! No stir plate, no malt, no alcohol swabs, no nutrient, no way! However, for Coopers yeast, it works...

Method
1. Buy a six pack of Coopers Original Pale Ale and place upright in the fridge for about a week for the yeast to settle.
2. Mix about 600ml of boiling water and 4 tablespoons of dextrose/sugar in a pyrex jug, cover with cling-wrap and leave to cool in the fridge for about 30mins.
3. Open 4 bottles and decant the beer into a jug, leaving behind the yeast sediment - about a couple of centimetres.
4. Pour the sugared water equally into each bottle, cover with cling-wrap and secure with a rubber band.
5. Shake the bottles then place them in a dark spot at a temperature in the mid 20's.
6. Give the bottles a shake in the morning and at night to keep the yeast in suspension.
7. After around 2 to 3 days the yeast should become active and begin forming a head.
8. Pitch the active yeast into a brew immediately or store in the fridge for about a week. Just remember to pull it out of the fridge to warm for couple of hours prior to pitching.

Some additional points to keep in mind;
- start with more yeast by using all 6 bottles,
- buy beer with the freshest yeast (ie. latest "Best After" date),
- lower alcohol content is better (mild ale or pale ale),
- it's okay to hold the culture at slightly higher temps to promote a quicker reactivation,
- one sanitised vessel (approx 1 litre) may be used rather than separate bottles,
- make sure the culture smells okay before pitching,
- buy another 6 pack for each culture and
- don't forget to drink the decanted beer


Thanks QLDKEV, you have answered all my questions. Cheers Mate
 

Liam_snorkel

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Taste. The yeast is a certain strain. You want an authentic coopers pale ale, use their yeast instead of a sachet. Beware, if you haven't got temp control forget it. From my experience brewing over 17 deg gives off a large amount of banana flavour. My first one was brewed at 20 deg and it was a banana milk shake beer.... not to my liking at all.
ruh roh. I've got one fermenting at 19deg at the moment.

Good thing I like bananas.
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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ruh roh. I've got one fermenting at 19deg at the moment.

Good thing I like bananas.

Just another question whilst i'm on this topic.

How long will the recultivated yeast last for, if stored correctly etc?

After fermentation is completed and its been bottled can you use the yeast cake for another brew down the track? Will the yeast cake have the same postive tatse affects as reculivating the yeast from the bottles or is this a waste of time?
 

mwd

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Just another question whilst i'm on this topic.

How long will the recultivated yeast last for, if stored correctly etc?

After fermentation is completed and its been bottled can you use the yeast cake for another brew down the track? Will the yeast cake have the same postive tatse affects as reculivating the yeast from the bottles or is this a waste of time?
If your sanitation is up to scratch the harvested yeast should be O.K. for a few months kept in the fridge but fresh is best.

Yes you can reuse the yeastcake from the fermentation vessel no problem. The recommendation is to only reuse yeast up to about 6 times before it becomes mutated and changes character. I tend to reuse yeast only about three times before starting with a fresh batch.

Edit: Check out this thread by Wolfy on how to do it.Linky also the reusing yeast thread in Kits and Extracts thread.
 

Yob

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Hay Jarvo, did you read though the links I provided you on the Coopers site? These are all the same questions to which you have been given answers links to research.

Wolfy's Rinsing Yeast in Pictures

Rinsing Yeast - The Brewing Network

Stepped Yeast Calculator

Tight arse Stir Plate

and countless other links are available.

Have a search through the multitudes of topics and have a read, No offence intended but understanding cannot be handed to you, you need to research it.

Capture.JPG

Search Function, top right

ed: spilleng
 

QldKev

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Just another question whilst i'm on this topic.

How long will the recultivated yeast last for, if stored correctly etc?

After fermentation is completed and its been bottled can you use the yeast cake for another brew down the track? Will the yeast cake have the same postive tatse affects as reculivating the yeast from the bottles or is this a waste of time?

I keep the coke bottles up to 6 months, and they taste fine. Even if you limited it to 2-3 months, it saves a lot of mucking around re-growing it often.

On a yeast slant, I've used on after 2 years. But then you have to step them up and stuff around, so I don't use slants anymore.

QldKev
 

ploto

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I recently re-cultured coopers bottle yeast for a CPA-style beer, too easy. I started the dregs from 3 bottles in a 200ml dme/water mix, then stepped it up to 1l and pitched that when it was ready.

Follow the links provided, pay attention to cleanliness and also have a read through this discussion topic for the article: http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/inde...showtopic=17276
 

Wolfy

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the benefits are that you cant buy that yeast... its the only way to get it. It is not the same as the kit yeast and will give a totally different beer...
Actually you can buy the yeast (in liquid form), but you're right that it's a different yeast-strain to the dry-yeast sachets provided in kits.
Typically Coopers-recultured yeast provides very distinctive flavours that are considered essential to the 'Australian Pale Ale' beer style.
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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Hay Jarvo, did you read though the links I provided you on the Coopers site? These are all the same questions to which you have been given answers links to research.

Wolfy's Rinsing Yeast in Pictures

Rinsing Yeast - The Brewing Network

Stepped Yeast Calculator

Tight arse Stir Plate

and countless other links are available.

Have a search through the multitudes of topics and have a read, No offence intended but understanding cannot be handed to you, you need to research it.

View attachment 52773

Search Function, top right

ed: spilleng

Yes I did, call me an idiot or whatever you will but somthings for me were still left unanswerd and I was unsure. I was always taught at school even if I researched and If I still wasn't sure to always ask for help.

I thought I would ask the helpful people in this foum to the specific questions I needed answered. And I appreciate their feedback!!

I use the search button everytime before I ask a question in the forums and in google. This time I needed more help, who knows the info that other people have given me today may help somone esle in the end.

Sorry if I upset you by asking this question :(

Cheers
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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If your sanitation is up to scratch the harvested yeast should be O.K. for a few months kept in the fridge but fresh is best.

Yes you can reuse the yeastcake from the fermentation vessel no problem. The recommendation is to only reuse yeast up to about 6 times before it becomes mutated and changes character. I tend to reuse yeast only about three times before starting with a fresh batch.

Edit: Check out this thread by Wolfy on how to do it.Linky also the reusing yeast thread in Kits and Extracts thread.
Thanks Mate mighty helpful!!!
 

ASYLUM_SPIRIT

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I recently re-cultured coopers bottle yeast for a CPA-style beer, too easy. I started the dregs from 3 bottles in a 200ml dme/water mix, then stepped it up to 1l and pitched that when it was ready.

Follow the links provided, pay attention to cleanliness and also have a read through this discussion topic for the article: http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/inde...showtopic=17276

Cheers buddy, I appreciate the help
 

np1962

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the benefits are that you cant buy that yeast... its the only way to get it. It is not the same as the kit yeast and will give a totally different beer...

Actually you can buy the yeast (in liquid form), but you're right that it's a different yeast-strain to the dry-yeast sachets provided in kits.
Typically Coopers-recultured yeast provides very distinctive flavours that are considered essential to the 'Australian Pale Ale' beer style.
You certainly can buy this yeast, in fact I have just received a shipment today that was manufactured 27/2/12.
Visit My Website - WLP009 Australian Ale
Platinum Strain, only available March/April
Cheers
Nige
 

Yob

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Sorry if I upset you by asking this question
not upset, just annoyed that you asked the same question and got the same answers and it doesnt seem you want to do any research for yourself.

Research is great, then trial the methods given to you, then put them into practice when you are confident you have the methods down pat.

You have asked the same question before (on multiple forums) and got approx the same answers (and certainly the same links to information)

so Im just a little confused.

sorry for coming off a little rough, but seriously.

Read. Listen. Practice. Do.

Yob
 

manticle

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Yes I did, call me an idiot or whatever you will but somthings for me were still left unanswerd and I was unsure. I was always taught at school even if I researched and If I still wasn't sure to always ask for help.

I thought I would ask the helpful people in this foum to the specific questions I needed answered. And I appreciate their feedback!!

I use the search button everytime before I ask a question in the forums and in google. This time I needed more help, who knows the info that other people have given me today may help somone esle in the end.

Sorry if I upset you by asking this question :(

Cheers
His words were encouraging you to search and research rather than calling you an idiot and to prove it, he provided you with several, very useful links which will help answer your further questions.
 
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