Too Much Head...on My Beer!

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jiggaman12

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Hey,

In my last 2 brews I've had a little issue with my final product. After it has been bottled, I sample them about a month later and they are fine and taste how they are supposed to. However, after about 2 months (since bottling) when pouring the beer into a glass, there is about double or triple the amount of head on the beer, and then about 3 months (since bottling) later, the bottles tend to "explode" when opening them. The head doesn't seem to taste infected or anything like that. I'm 95% sure that I bottled the beer when fermentation had finished.

The only difference between these brews and previous ones is that I used star san to sanitise the bottles. I'm wondering if I might've made the solution too strong and that this might affect the beer in this way? Or would you think that it's more likely that fermentation hadn't finished?
 

kelbygreen

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more likely that fermentation was not finished. I would say starsan if over dossed would have a negative impact on the yeast, so they would more likely die off. As starsan does not contain any sugars (that I know of) then the yeast cannot ferment the starsan which means it will not affect the way it carbs apart from if mixed to strong the PH may be to high and kill the yeast.

Another thing to think off is, how did you add the sugar. If using carb drops they seem to overcarb the beer, if using a scoop and putting in the bottles then maybe you doubled up a few?? if bulk priming maybe you got the calculations wrong??? Or maybe the sugar you are using is more fermentable then you think, and of coarse the one you ask did you bottle it to soon?? 10 days minimum I find in the fermenter for ales and lagers get alot more time and care (about 8-10 weeks all up)
 

Rizzla

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Don't know a lot about bottling, I keg my brews. Could it be storage temp ? Don't know where you but its generally warmer everywhere (summer). The earlier brews would have been stored in cooler conditions than the later problem brew.
Cheers
 

kelbygreen

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but heat does not make the yeast eat more sugars it makes them eat it faster, I would say this would stress the yeast out more and if anything make them stop early? but I am no yeast expert and have not read any yeast books so thats pure thought based no knowledge in it haha
 

black_labb

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Could it be the beers finished prematurely due to yeast health and/or fermentation temp and the long periods of time led to the yeast eventually chewing through the more complex sugar overcarbing the beer? I'm guessing these were fermented in winter which could have meant lower temps encouraging the yeast to floc out early

Was the final gravity where you would expect?
 

kelbygreen

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very good point!
yeast health and temps are a big part also pitching rates (comes under health a bit) and aeration. If it was not as viable as you thought and you under pitched they would struggle the healthy yeast would consume there part go to sleep and may not chew threw it all. But they still work very slowly so as you say 3 months down the track and they are still going.

I would be cracking the caps a little to releave pressure if they are gushing. Just screw them open a tad untill the gas escapes and quickly screw it back on (prob best to do cold) and do it with one maybe twice a day for 2 days then try it in another few days and if its better then do it to all of them. I would be worrying about bottle bombs if there gushing lol

Could it be the beers finished prematurely due to yeast health and/or fermentation temp and the long periods of time led to the yeast eventually chewing through the more complex sugar overcarbing the beer? I'm guessing these were fermented in winter which could have meant lower temps encouraging the yeast to floc out early

Was the final gravity where you would expect?
 

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