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Sethanon

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Hello,

I've been brewing Scotch Ales for awhile now but always a Partial or Kit and I've decided to step up into AG brewing this is a recipe given to me by a friend who said it was okay but needed some tweaking if possible could you guys please take a look and make some recommendations I've run it through Beer smith and everything comes up green but that doesn't mean it will taste nice! the AG system I'll be using is a 20Lt Braumeister and this will be my first brew using it I am really excited! anyway here is the recipe.

Pale Malt (Joe white) 7.21kg (93.5%)
Roasted Barley 0.25kg (3.2%)
Carafoam 0.25kg (3.2%)
East Kent Goldings 49g boil 60min

Using Wyeast Labs Scottich Ale liquid yeast.

Thanks for any input you guys have like I said it will be my first AG brew.
 

Logman

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Looks like a nice simple way to do your first AG to me. I do Scotch Ales all the time and there's not much to it - using the Wyeast is probably the important part. Amber Candi Sugar in the boil tastes great in SA if you want to try something different.

:icon_cheers:
 

JDW81

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Hello,

I've been brewing Scotch Ales for awhile now but always a Partial or Kit and I've decided to step up into AG brewing this is a recipe given to me by a friend who said it was okay but needed some tweaking if possible could you guys please take a look and make some recommendations I've run it through Beer smith and everything comes up green but that doesn't mean it will taste nice! the AG system I'll be using is a 20Lt Braumeister and this will be my first brew using it I am really excited! anyway here is the recipe.

Pale Malt (Joe white) 7.21kg (93.5%)
Roasted Barley 0.25kg (3.2%)
Carafoam 0.25kg (3.2%)
East Kent Goldings 49g boil 60min

Using Wyeast Labs Scottich Ale liquid yeast.

Thanks for any input you guys have like I said it will be my first AG brew.
What is the batch size and target OG?

I don't use a BM but you've got nearly 8kgs of grain there, that might be pushing it if you're only using a 20L one.
 

black_labb

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I haven't brewed one so take this with a grain of salt but I'd think about replacing some of the rb with more flavoursome srystal than carafoam or caramelising some of the first runnings. You may be missing a fair bit of the caramelised flavours otherwise.
 

Sethanon

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What is the batch size and target OG?

I don't use a BM but you've got nearly 8kgs of grain there, that might be pushing it if you're only using a 20L one.
batch size is aiming for 21lts with an OG of 1.092 I know that's a little high for the style guide but I can't get the ABV above 6% by using less grain I could probably go as low as 6kg or maybe there is another malt I could use to keep the dark copper colour while keeping the ABV high?


I was also thinking of taking a few liters of the wort during the boil and reducing it to almost a syrup to get that caramel flavor I've done it a couple of times with a partial and it's come up good before.

Cheers
 

Sethanon

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I haven't brewed one so take this with a grain of salt but I'd think about replacing some of the rb with more flavoursome srystal than carafoam or caramelising some of the first runnings. You may be missing a fair bit of the caramelised flavours otherwise.
agree i've not tried this recipe myself but my mate said it was okay but didn't know how to fix it
 

manticle

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Recently made a scotch ale with vitalstatistix - we went all maris otter with some caramelised/reduced runnings and just boiled for 3/12 hours to get colour and complexity.

Will be bulk ageing for a while so can't tell you if it's worked perfectly but colour looks good and early tastes are promising.
 

doon

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You won't get 8kg in a 20l BM 6 would be absolute max. You have to double mash if you want bigger beers or add malt extract
 

TidalPete

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Scotch Ale?
Never heard of it although others have. ;)
Your recipe looks like a Scottish Wee Heavy to me (But too lazy to plug it into BeerSmith to find out) so drop the RB to around 2.2% whilst raising the base malt by the difference. The Carafoam should give you the head that I sadly missed in my last attempt.
Your recipe should be too big for your BM. You can always cut back on the base malt & add some decent quality dried malt to the kettle to make up the difference but sadly it won't taste the same.
A 50 litre BM would have been your better option but even then that's got its limitations.
 

dicko

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Do a search on the recipe data base on this forum and check out an 80 shilling Scottish ale brewed by a member here called SteveSA.

This beer is a ripper and one a few prizes when it was brewed - about 2005 iirc.
Yeast choice is important with a Scottish Ale
For your first AG good advice is to keep it simple.
The recipe you posted will need to be scaled to suit your BM 20 litre but you have the percentages so it should not be a problem with beer smith

Good luck and have fun

Cheers

Edit here is the link. http://www.aussiehomebrewer.com/forum/inde...&recipe=146
 

Sethanon

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Thanks for all your help guys. I would have gone the 50lt but the minister for fun and finance (mrs) wouldn't let me fork out for it. I might put the Scotch Ale on the back burner for awhile and maybe start my AG experience with a Cream Ale or a simple Pale ale! and try and work a scotch ale recipe once I work out what the BM is capable of, I'll be doing trappist beers in one in no time! haha
 

Bribie G

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Note to Pete:

 
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Bribie G

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Actually the term "Scotch" was used almost entirely in the North East of England. With the growth of railways in the 19th century Edinburgh became a major brewing centre and provided a huge part of the market on Tyneside and the North East with breweries such as Deuchar, McEwans and Lorimers. They did 3 styles 60/-, 70/- and 80/- but they were called different names over the border in England, although exactly matching styles were brewed there in the local breweries such as Newcastle and Vaux of Sunderland.

A typical offering when I was a late teen / 20 something was a very weak beer which had just about died out, a top of the range beer such as McEwans Export, Federation Clubs "special", Newcastle Exhibition or Camerons Strogarm, around 4.3% ABV and a "Scotch" ale which much darker and around 3.8% ABV.

So if you walked into a pub in Newcastle, Gateshead or Sunderland and asked for a pint of Scotch you would inevitably get, depending on the tied house, a pint of Lorimers Scotch, Federation Clubs "ordinary" which everyone called scotch anyway, McEwans Scotch or an equivalent, and all were exactly in the 70/- range.

Over the border these beers were never referred to as Scotch, which would have been a sacrilege, but as "Heavy". Confusingly the 80/- were stronger than the "Heavy" and were usually referred to as "Export".
 

TidalPete

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Actually the term "Scotch" was used almost entirely in the North East of England. With the growth of railways in the 19th century Edinburgh became a major brewing centre and provided a huge part of the market on Tyneside and the North East with breweries such as Deuchar, McEwans and Lorimers. They did 3 styles 60/-, 70/- and 80/- but they were called different names over the border in England, although exactly matching styles were brewed there in the local breweries such as Newcastle and Vaux of Sunderland.

A typical offering when I was a late teen / 20 something was a very weak beer which had just about died out, a top of the range beer such as McEwans Export, Federation Clubs "special", Newcastle Exhibition or Camerons Strogarm, around 4.3% ABV and a "Scotch" ale which much darker and around 3.8% ABV.

So if you walked into a pub in Newcastle, Gateshead or Sunderland and asked for a pint of Scotch you would inevitably get, depending on the tied house, a pint of Lorimers Scotch, Federation Clubs "ordinary" which everyone called scotch anyway, McEwans Scotch or an equivalent, and all were exactly in the 70/- range.

Over the border these beers were never referred to as Scotch, which would have been a sacrilege, but as "Heavy". Confusingly the 80/- were stronger than the "Heavy" and were usually referred to as "Export".
:icon_offtopic:
I bow to your extensive knowledge of all British Beery Things Bribie. :beer:
I've always been under the impression that Scotmen prefer the word "Scottish" rather than "Scotch". Those bloody English barbarians have a lot to answer for. :lol:
 

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