Problem With Taps In Fridge.

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paul

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Heres what works for me:

3.5 metres of 5mm ID beer line onto the 6mm barbs of the disconnects.

I carbonate by initially rocking the keg then leaving it in the fridge hooked up with other kegs that are gassed. This brings the carbonation up to the same level as the rest of the kegs in the fridge.

I pour at 13 - 14 psi. I leave the gas hooked up the whole time and turn on the bottle for a few seconds when i have a beer. The pouring pressure only drops when you drink lots or the kegs are carbonating still. Once the kegs are gassed you dont often have to add more gas except when youve drunk a few pints.

I have had trouble in the past with gas coming out in the beer line and found that it was due to the keg not being under enough pressure.

EG - if the keg is overgassed your going to get gas in the line at pouring pressure, or if the beer line length is too short the gas will be in the line as your pouring pressure isnt the same a the gassing pressure..
 

L.X.

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OK a few more questions on kegging.
I just got my keg system set up and carbonated my first keg using Ross's method.

I am pouring about half foam/half liquid. Im guessing I have overdone the co2 level a bit. I have also noticed gas getting into the beer line is this a dead give away that it is over gassed?

My beer line is 1.75 metres long and I was wondering after reading here that it could be an issue (too short). Can I lower my dispensing pressure to compensate if it is?

Alex
 

L.X.

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Another question for the seasoned keggers.

I have been shaking the keg and releasing pressure every now and then, is that the best method to lower the gas level or should be trying something else?
 

Fingerlickin_B

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L.X. said:
I am pouring about half foam/half liquid.
[post="83155"][/post]​
I have a really stupid question for you...no offence...

Are you using the tap/s correctly?

PZ.
 

Wortgames

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LX, there's no substitute for time unfortunately. The only thing that will reduce the foaming is letting it settle, and letting the pressure and temperature stabilise.

Make sure you are opening the tap all the way too, as a throttled tap will always foam.

Generally, you will find increasing the serving pressure will actually reduce foaming, as it is the gas trying to come out of solution that causes it. However, if you leave it at the higher pressure too long, you over carbonate, and you make it worse. Also if it hits the glass too fast it will foam.

If the keg is over carbonated, let it sit at your serving temperature and burp it every couple of hours to release excess pressure. Don't be taking it out of the fridge and shaking it as you'll never get it right.

I'm a big proponent of the balanced system, and that means getting the temperature and pressure right first, then tuning your lines to give you the right flow once the keg is stable.
 

L.X.

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Well I think so.
I have a pluto gun and according to the instructions that came with the kit I pour with the gun fully opened.

I have noticed that you can adjust the the amount that it opens with the nut on the back of the gun but i assumed that it would be set up correct from new, so havent touched it.
 

Fingerlickin_B

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Well I guess maybe your beer is overcarbonated...but...

Make sure you open the gun with a "snap" and the same on closing...do it fast :)

*edit* - don't forget all the other usual and obvious crap like pouring into the glass wall not the base, blah, blah, etc.

PZ.
 

L.X.

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Thanks for the comments,

At this stage I am in no rush to drink it as the beer could do with a bit of matureing. So will just keep burping and checking. Then wait another week or so.
 

Wortgames

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LX, the gun may not necessarily be set up properly. The handle should be very slightly loose (ie wobble a bit) when closed, so you get the full travel. If it wobbles too much then it may not open fully, and if it's too tight then it may not seal properly on closing.
 

JasonY

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LX youcould have a problem with both. I am with Wortgames in using a balanced system, I can fit three kegs in the fridge so one is carbonating while the other two are drinking (takes about a week I reckon).

Anyway the length of beer line you need is a function of serving pressure and ID of the line. Essentially you want the pressure drop over the beer line to be just about as much as the pouring pressure so the beer comes out at a good pace - not like a hose. If you have this wrong then the beer will piss out and you get ice-cream. The catch is that if you drop your pressure to slow the flow then the CO2 will come out of solution as you carbonated at a higher pressure. If you search around you will find the calcs to work out the required length of line. The post by Nearly in the thread I linked earlier is excellent and I would recommend reading it. I have inline restrictors in my beer lines which allow you to adjust this drop with the turn of a nob so you can use small lengths of beer line.

If you have over carbed then its the same problem in reverse, you want to dispense at 100kpa say and you have overgassed to the equivalent of say 140kpa. At 100kpa the gas will come out of solution in the beer line, increasing the pressure will keep the gas in but increase the pour speed so you are stuffed again.

Takes a bit of stuffing about but once you have it right you will never look back. The advantage of a balanced system is once you get it right you dont stuff about with it and it should produce consistant results. The downside is it takes longer to carbonate. With force carbonating the advantage is that it is fast, the disadvantage is that it is easy to stuff up (with practice you get around this).

Anyway good luck I am sure you will sort your probs out without too much fuss.
 

L.X.

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Thanks for the ideas.

The gun looks ok.
I am now sure that its over gasses although its a bit better now than at first.
After reading that info the balanced system looks a good way to go.
So the next keg ill try the week at 100kpa. I may need some more beer line though.

Cheers
Alex
 

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