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Liquid Yeast

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Bigfella

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Ok here we go on the liquid yeast subject again.

I'm propagating some yeast again and was wondering.
Is the yeast just what settles at the bottom.
The reason I ask is when you are stepping up the yeast and have to keep adding new wort.
Could you not just let is settle then drain of the liquid and ad more wort. When you have a good amount off yeast leave the liquid shake it up then divide it into bottles.
Would this work if not why not?

Thanks Bigfella
 
J

Jovial_Monk

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I think White Labs suggest that when making a starter, just before pitching, pour the clear liquid above the yeast cake into a new starter culture, add some wort from the mash tun drawn out at 30 min mark, quick boil & chill and add this to the starter bottle. You can then pitch a nice active starter when you have finished the mash, boil & chill.

Jovial Monk
 

Rubes

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From White Labs site

A "starter" can be any volume of wort that you add yeast to before using it to make your beer. The yeast get active in this smaller volume, usually for 1-2 days, and then can be added to 5 gallons of beer, or 10 gallons, or whatever size your brewing. This can be a good way to "proof" the yeast, and also when making high gravity beers. White Labs recommends on their label to make a starter "if the gravity is over 1.070, if the yeast is past its "best before" date, or if a faster start is desired".
Procedure:
Make up a 1-2 pint wort, gravity ~1.040, hopped as normal. Boil for 30 minutes, cool to room temperature. Pitch one vial, shake well and let sit for 1-2 days. Little to no activity will be seen in the starter, since this is a very small volume compared to the quantity of yeast pitched. The yeast in a starter may be done within a couple of hours. But a layer of yeast should be at the bottom after 1-2 days. The wort on top of the yeast can be either decanted of the top, or left in and pitched with the whole volume. Most pitch the whole volume, but if the starter gets to the point of 2 liters for 5 gallons, then we recommend decanting the wort off the yeast.
Typical Starter Volumes for 5 gallons:
To activate the yeast: 1 pint
To regenerate expired yeast (there will be living yeast in the package for ~1 year): 2 pints
To brew a high gravity beer: 2 pints
To brew a lager beer, starting fermentation 50-55F: 4 pints
 

Bigfella

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yeah that is sort of what I was thinking. So you could pour of the wort. Me thinks
 

Rubes

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For your larger starter wouldn't this favour the dormant/dying yeast that has already flocculated? In a roaring starter isn't the active yeast still in the wort and would be poured off in a larger stepped starter?

What I do is just pitch the lot even if I have made a stepped 2 litre starter.

And come to think of it what are they talking about litres for anyway??? 2 liters in 5 gallons?? Why can't they make up their minds!!!
 

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