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Ph Of Aussie Tap Water.

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phantom

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OK does anybody know of a site or relevant info service about the ph of tap water in major capitals?My understanding is that Adelaides water is harder than Melbournes,which means that without ammendments a brew that i do will be different to a guy in melbournes even with identical ingredients.

Just another poser:we all know about ph and acid v alkaline but what does ph stand for?This question was posed by a lecturer during my hort certificate studies and drew a blank from all.We all knew how to determine/adjust and what effect it had on plants ,but not what it stood for.

A big pat on the back to the first member with the correct answer,and yes i do know what it is.

Yours in the constant pursuit of knowledge ,Phantom :blink:
 

Doc

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pH = Potential of Hydrogen.

And you can get a water report from your water supplier with the chemical makeup of your water supply including pH levels.
They have all been posted here before so use the search function and you should find them.

Beers,
Doc
 
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phantom

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;) Good work brainiac.

Cheers for the tip.

P.S I,m over my hissy fit now :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:


Oh yeah and i,ve cracked a half century,WOOOO HOOOO !!!!!!!
 

MCWB

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I don't know about p = potential Doc, in fact I don't think pH stands for anything at all. p in physical chemistry means '-log10' (e.g. pKa = -log10(Ka) and pH = -log10[H+]). I guess they use H because saying 'H' is much easier than saying 'concentration of hydrogen ions'. :p

phantom: just go to your water supplier's website, they should have a water analysis up there. :)
 
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phantom

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Well my lecturer said it was proportion or potential hydrogen,so I,m with doc on this one.Maybe we should email doctor karl for the definitive answer
 

MCWB

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phantom said:
Well my lecturer said it was proportion or potential hydrogen,so I,m with doc on this one.
Chemical potential is an entierly different animal... I think he's trying to create an acronym where none exists. :)
 

Duff

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Doc's right, it is potential and the concentration of H+ via the good old log scale.
 

Gulf Brewery

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Hi

I have the Adelaide water profile info for 99 to 04.
I have sent the file to sosman and I'm sure he will add it to his site.

Cheers
Pedro
 

sosman

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Just another poser:we all know about ph and acid v alkaline but what does ph stand for?
4 definitions found for pH

From WordNet ® 2.0 :

pH
n : (chemistry) p(otential of) H(ydrogen); the logarithm of the
reciprocal of hydrogen-ion concentration in gram atoms
per liter; provides a measure on a scale from 0 to 14 of
the acidity or alkalinity of a solution (where 7 is
neutral and greater than 7 is acidic and less than 7 is
basic) [syn: pH scale]

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03) :

PH

The tool for looking up people in Eudora on the
Macintosh. Equivalent to Unix's finger service.

From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03) :

pH

Parallel Haskell


From The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03) :

ph

The country code for the Philippines.

Ie I have no idea.
 

chiller

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phantom said:
OK does anybody know of a site or relevant info service about the ph of tap water in major capitals?My understanding is that Adelaides water is harder than Melbournes,which means that without ammendments a brew that i do will be different to a guy in melbournes even with identical ingredients.

Just another poser:we all know about ph and acid v alkaline but what does ph stand for?This question was posed by a lecturer during my hort certificate studies and drew a blank from all.We all knew how to determine/adjust and what effect it had on plants ,but not what it stood for.

A big pat on the back to the first member with the correct answer,and yes i do know what it is.

Yours in the constant pursuit of knowledge ,Phantom :blink:
Hi Phantom,

Now apart from 20 questions is there a reason for your question based on a particular method of brewing beer?

Are you an all grain brewer. If so then info can be provided to you by others on this forum who are all grain brewers from Adelaide.

If you make beer from kits and bit or extract you will need to have a ph meter and the appropriate acid to adjust the water to the level you require to achieve levels you feel are appropriate.

Water pH is not the determining factor alone in flavour profile for a beer derived from a particular water. The balance of salts -- and particular salts at that -- determine the unique character of a beer based on a particular water profile.

In all grain brewing the mash pH is very important to efficient wort extraction as is the grain bed pH and runoff pH during the sparge. With kits and extract you are relying on the can manufacturer to get the pH levels correct -- which they do -- however the mashing and sparging for a kit or extract is something that you have no control over.


Steve
 
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