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Duff

Worst Website Ever....
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Boys,

I'm getting more into my AG's now and am starting to think about formulating receipes. Apart from the receipes posted on the AHB website, can anyone recommend a good book or source of receipes for a beginning AG'er (I've done 4 now).

Back to the cricket.

Cheers - Duff.
 

GMK

BrewInn Barossa:~ Home to GMKenterprises ~
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get Beer Captured - great book
 
J

Jovial_Monk

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Ummmmmm Clone Brews and Beer Captured are a bit suss IMHO

Homebrewing by G Wheeler is a great How To book, Brew Your Own Real English Ales and Brew Classic European Beers by g Wheeler and Roger Protz (all CAMRA publications) are great sources of recipes as are LaPensee&Protz "IPAs" and "Stouts and Porters"

There is always Daniels for info an many beerstyles

The Skotrat Recipe Archives have many great recipes, OK mostly in Am units


Jovial Monk
 

Justin

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Just remember not all recipes that you find posted on the net (or even in books!) are going to be good recipes by good (knowledgable) brewers. Unfortunately there are no quality controls on the net. You'll probably be safer going for published books with good feedback (as per JM's recommendations) as a start until you can start to analyse a recipe to see if it's going to be a good recipe or not, or spot the flaws. eg. Too much crystal malt in that recipe, or all that crystal malt and that high mash temp too, HEY where's the bittering hops?

It can be a bit of a minefield out there (especially when you throw in different malts from different countries, all of which have their own subtle characteristics eg. JW Trad ale vs. TF Marris Otter), so recipes off the net that have already received good feed back by other brewers are the ones you want to pick up. Or recipes by well known and respected contributors to brewing forums usually yeild nice ones.

But on this note, I really should get myself a really good brewing book with some quality recipes. I get quite a few good ones off one of my fairly experienced mates, I've made up some good ones on my own too but it's not uncommon for my own recipes to end up a bit sweet or a bit too bitter, or a bit too thin etc. etc. Not to say they are not nice drinking beers, but the recipe is just the start of the beer-you've then got the brew it.

Here is an interesting article on Beer balance. Worth reading and thinking about in my opinion, especially if you want to design your own recipes. Although this might seem a little complicated, it's worth adding to you internet favourites or printing out to go in the brew folder for a rainy day.

http://beercolor.netfirms.com/balance.html

Cheers, Justin
 

pint of lager

brewing on the verandah
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I have seen some really suspect recipes on the net, and some really excellent ones.

Avoid ones that do not give IBU's, or volumes. For example, is a brewer using 5 gallons US or imperial? Or ones that just give a weight of hops, without giving the IBU's, for example 30 gms Fuggles. Add to this, variations in local malts available, and you can really launch into the wrong beer.

The Vicbrew booklets are good value, they are collections of winning recipes from the Victorian state comp, with brewer's notes and judges botes. The years that Victoria host the Nationals, also include the results from the Nationals. They also include useful brewer's info. G&G sell them, as well as a good range of other books.

Once you have brewed a few decent basic recipes, and tried them from your own bottle, you will have a much better idea as to what part of the shonkies recipe to follow, and what part to use in your own brewery
 

GMK

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Vicbrew Booklets are good - as POL has said - especially as GMK has 2 published Recipes in one of them...

For the Nationals of course...
:D
 

dicko

Boston Bay Brewery
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Hi Duff,
The book, "Designing Great Beers" by Ray Daniels is a good start.
It outlines the basic ingredients and give you the history of the style you may wish to re create.
It does not give you recipes as such but allows you to formulate your own ideas within their guidlines if you wish.
"Beer captured"gives you a lot of recipes to work on if you want to follow basic ingredients.
Recipes off the net and some brewing sites can be "dodgy" to say the least.
Read the books and then think about what you want to achieve and then go for it from there.

Cheers
 

sosman

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On top of the good advice already given, pick a style you like drinking and work on it over a number of brews. Doesn't mean you have to brew it every time - just keep making adjustments to the recipe so you get a feel for what is happening.
 

Tony

Quality over Quantity
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Even better........

Get Promash!

If you have it ........... great.

get some AG brewers on here and there are many fo email you Recire files that they have found to work and import them to the recipe folder in promash.

That stout billys site has lots of recipes but i agree with all above...... you have to be able to pick the gold from the brown nuggets if you know what i mean.

Do what i did.

Start with something basic in the way of grain and add some hops.

If its not to your taste then adjust to suit..

But to do this properly you need good brewing software.

If you havnt got it, get promash.
 

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