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HazyNick

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Hi all

I am now on my 5th brew and really enjoying the experience. I have recently purchased a fridge and with my heat belt have managed to keep my current brew at around 18 degrees using my Inkbird (great advice on that)

I am brewing an IPA with Lallemand New England American Ale yeast.

I have noticed after 9 days the airlock has stopped bubbling however my hydrometer reading is 1050 (recommended FG of 1019-1021).

The recipes I use (extract kits atm) tend to say 7-9 days fermentation however mine usually take around 3-4 weeks. I'm not in a hurry and am happy to wait, however as there is no action in the airlock I am wondering if my yeast has gone to sleep and if so is there any technique I should use (such as increase the wort temperature) to get the fernmentationprocess happening again.

Once again i am appreciative of any feedback.

Cheers
 

kadmium

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Any idea one what the initial (OG) was? Are you sure your hydrometer is accurate? What temp are you taking your hydrometer readings?

1050 is pretty high, and 1019-1021 is really quite high for an FG? It could have a sweet flavour to it. I usually end up around 1.014 for FG on NEIPAs using a Marris Otter base.

Maybe share the full recipe, how many litres, how much yeast you pitched, which yeast it was (the kit yeast or something else) and give us some more info about your process. 3-4 weeks is a very long time for a primary fermentation. I am brewing a Robust Porter with an OG of 1.060 and it's finished in 3 days at 19c, it will need time to clean up and rest, but the bulk of the fermentation is over usually within a week.
 

HazyNick

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Its a Kegland extract kit for a milkshake IPA - 23 litres

1 x Muntoons Brewmaker IPA ingredient can
2 x Muntoons export lager
1 x lactose
1 x 100g Eldorado hop pellets (dry hopping not yet done)
2 x lallemand new england American ale yeast (22g total)

Process was pour in cans of extract plus extract, 1 Litre boiling water to clean out cans and then fill to 23 litre with cold water

I couldn't take original OG as it was quite thick (maybe I should have stirred it, but three cans of extract meant I could not get a flow of liquid to measure).

The recipe states OG 1068 - 1071 to FG 1019 - 1021, keep beer between 16-20 degrees C

The sample I took to get the 1050 was 7 days after start of fermentation/pitching the yeast.
 

Cloud Surfer

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I’m brand new to this to, but your 1.050 after five days might be affected by unmixed extract at the bottom of the fermenter that the yeast hasn’t got to yet.

I know the instructions say toss the extract straight into the fermenter and I guess that’s what lots of people do. I make a big wort boil with all my extract mixed in. Last brew was 4 cans of extract, Belgium Candi Syrup, steeped grain liquid and hops all in the big pot. I only had the extract in there for the last 10 minutes of the boil, but I like that everything is completely mixed. I cool it then pour fridge cold water on top and it comes out around pitching temperature. I can take an accurate OG at that stage.
 

Cloud Surfer

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Has anyone told you the extract tip of submerging the cans in hot water for 20 minutes before you open them. They pour out nice and easy after doing that.
 

HazyNick

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Thanks, yes I submerged all cans in Hot water to loosen the extract.

If the extract is as you say should I try and stir the wort?

Silly question, I hear the term wort boil a bit but can't seem to find an explanation that makes sense to me. Is it adding boiling water into the fermenter with the wort? If you could let me know how this works I may try it for my next Brew
 

GrumpyPaul

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I could find milk shake IPA on keglands site - but is does look like most of their kits have details listed for OG and FG.
 

kadmium

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Hey mate,

First of all Lactose is an unfermentable sugar, so it will leave your beer sweeter. It's a strange ingredient for an extract kit, and for IPAs in general. I know some big breweries add Lactose to their New England IPAs to artificially boost residual sweetness and body, but I find it gives a milk sweetness that I personally don't enjoy. However, having said that I don't like or drink milk either (I am a hipster Almond Flat White kind of melburnian)

I think the beer will come out fine, and if the extract WAS at the bottom, then your SG would be measuring lower than it is. However, if it does just sit at the bottom not properly mixed in, this would give you a longer ferment time.

I would just mix thoroughly when you add the extract in. You can boil some water on the stove, add in your cans and get it all nice and liquidy and then pour that into the fermenter and top up with cold water. That does help.
 

HazyNick

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Great thanks everyone, happy to wait and learning everyday.

It should be an interesting brew, and to be honest I don't drink milk either, however I do like some of the milkshake IPAs, my local brewery in Katoomba (Blue Mountains) does a very nice oat cream IPA.
 

kadmium

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Great thanks everyone, happy to wait and learning everyday.

It should be an interesting brew, and to be honest I don't drink milk either, however I do like some of the milkshake IPAs, my local brewery in Katoomba (Blue Mountains) does a very nice oat cream IPA.
Ahhh, you just said 'IPA with Lallemand New England American Yeast' and I presumed it was a hazy IPA style. A milkshake IPA makes sense to add Lactose. I do enjoy the odd Milkshake IPA and Stout, I just don't enjoy it in Hazy IPAs which is why I said it was a strange ingredient. It also explains the FG of 1.020!

2 packets of yeast should have been enough, even if it is a medium-high gravity to start (lactose makes it higher than it truly is) so I wouldn't think it's struggling due to that.
 

HazyNick

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Yeah sorry, last time I mentioned I was brewing a NEIPA I got some interesting comments on my choice of beer so I was being a bit sheepish.

Thanks for the feedback.
 

Cloud Surfer

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Silly question, I hear the term wort boil a bit but can't seem to find an explanation that makes sense to me. Is it adding boiling water into the fermenter with the wort? If you could let me know how this works I may try it for my next Brew
How it works for me, is after I’ve steeped the grains I bring the liquid to a boil. Then I’ll add hops as required per the schedule, which could be up to a 60 minute boil. I don’t boil the extract long, 10 minutes or so at the end. That’s my wort boil. I cool the wort to about 30C and then pour it into the fermenter and pour 4C water on top and that brings it close to my pitching temp.

I guess I don’t pour the extract straight into the fermenter because I want to get it mixed outside the fermenter when it’s hot, so I’m not spending too much time with the fermenter lid off, pouring in stuff and trying to get it all mixed together in there. I try to get the lid closed as quick as I can to cut down on the infection risk. That’s just what works for me. I’m new and learning the ropes myself.
 

kadmium

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Yeah sorry, last time I mentioned I was brewing a NEIPA I got some interesting comments on my choice of beer so I was being a bit sheepish.

Thanks for the feedback.
Don't worry, there seems to be people on here who think 3 hop pellets in an entire beer is too much! I am a hop head, but that doesn't stop me from enjoying Porters, Stouts and all manner of classic beers.

Beer is for drinking and last time I checked BJCP NEIPAs are a beer, so the haters can take a flying leap! Never be ashamed of what you drink!
 

HazyNick

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Don't worry, I love the hops also, in fact I am attempting to grow some now, so I don't get too offended by it. I prefer hoppy ales and the NEIPA I brewed (in the bottle for 3 weeks now) is pretty good if I don't say so myself.

thanks for your take Cloud Surfer. I do steep the grains, I do add the hops to boiling water but I haven't tried adding the extract to boiling water prior to putting it into the fermnetr. It even sounds like that could be less messy also.

Cheers
 

HazyNick

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Hi, i'm still concerned about the lack of progress with fermentation. the hydrometer reading is down to 1040 (so it has moved 10 points in 7 days) but it has been 15 days since pitching. The temperature is a constant 18 degrees. Is there anything I can do to speed this up?

I have read other posts that suggest shaking/stirring/transferring to another container and then back again/adding olive oil. I am planning to dry hop also and have read that can get the yeast working again, however last time I dry hopped I had reached the OG.

I don't want to ruin the brew and I am happy to wait, just so much information out there.
 

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