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Counterflow Chiller And Cold Break Q

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Rubes

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Just curious. For those using a counterflow chiller what do you do with the cold break?
 

GMK

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The reports taht i have read on this say that the cold break does not harm the beer - it actually is good for the yeast by providing nutrients.
 

kman

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can you explain what a cold break is?

i dont have one of these, but im just curious
 

Rubes

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I'll leave the full explanation to the experts but basically when you quickly cool your wort it causes protiens/phenols to drop out that otherwise would hang around in your beer. End result is a clearer and cleaner tasting beer and one less likely to go stale later.
 

jayse

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The cold break is a vital part of brewing and it happens or should happen to all worts.

What happens is the clear hot wort you have at the end of the boil still has a lot of stuff in it that you don't want. Cooling in quickly basically gets all this out the wort and it forms what is called a cold break.
Its made up of protein-polyphenol (tannin) and it is essential to make sure you get a good cold break if you want to make a nice clear clean beer.
For most beers we make it is fine for the cold break to go into the fermentor.
CFCs' are the best for getting and good cold break.
Therefore they should beable to produce clearer beer given you have done everything else right.

Jayse
 

wedge

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Can anyone give a good report of Goliaths CFC that was used at the BBD. ie. How fast did it cool the wort. I reckon i could make one for about $20 cheaper through some connections.

Can anyone think of a few improvements even?
 

Rubes

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Jayse when would you advise removing the cold break?

Wedge have you seen the Chillus Convolutas? Not sure how you could make this yourself but an interesting idea.
 

wedge

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oh yeah!!!!! i'm trying to work out whether it wouold be cheaper in the long run just to import one of these.
 

jayse

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The Goliath chiller went well it brought it down to the exact pitching temp of about 22c.

The cold break will just settle to the bottom so no props it should settle out fairly quickly.
If you wanted to remove it you could let it settle before you pitch the yeast and then rack it of to another vessel a hour or so later.

Jayse
 

wedge

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how fast jayse?
 

GMK

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On Anzac Day at the Barossa Brewhaus i used my St Pats convoluted Copper Counter Flow Wort Chiller.

It was imported from usa...

100.00usd ......plus freight or a good mate on his way out here....

Excellent.
 

jayse

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wedge said:
how fast jayse?
About the time it took to drink a beer or two. :chug: :chug: :D

Jayse
 

Matty

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Can I ask a really dumb question?
When you attach a CF wort chiller, do you recirculate the wort back into the boiler or straight into the fermenter?

My initial belief was you ran the wort from the boiler into the CF wort chiller and the outlet of this goes straight into the fermenter.. Is this correct?
 

GMK

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Matty said:
Can I ask a really dumb question?
When you attach a CF wort chiller, do you recirculate the wort back into the boiler or straight into the fermenter?

My initial belief was you ran the wort from the boiler into the CF wort chiller and the outlet of this goes straight into the fermenter.. Is this correct?
You attach the oulet of the CCCFWC to the fermenter.

The cooled wort goes directly into the fermenter.

The only dumb question is the question that is not asked.
 

JasonY

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So if I read all this right most ppl seem to be happy to leave the cold break in the fermenter? Anyone see a problem with this? Does it matter for some styles but not others?

Just had my first run using a cfc and the cold break is certainly plentiful :eek: just wondering if I should rack before pitching?
 

pint of lager

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Re cold break ending up in fermenter

From my reading, about 20% cold break remaining in the brew is good. Too much, and it produces off flavours. Too little, and it affects yeast performance. I am unsure, as I thought that once break material is formed, that this then is unavailable to the yeast.

I run my wort into a spare transfer fermenter, I stop at about 40% total runoff, allow this to stand for about an hour, pour into fermenter, pitch and airate.

Run the remaining 60% into the transfer fermenter, let it stand for a few hours, then drop the wort off the break material into the fermenter.

Or, you can let the whole lot through, then skim the brew as it ferments, alot of the break comes to the top during fermentation.
 

chiller

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I have been using a CFC for some time and run my wort to a blue cube and let it stand for anything up ro 12 hours. Most if not all visible break material falls below the tap outlet.

I run a litre of wort straight off the CFC into a starter bottle and mix with my active yeast. This aclimatises the yeast to the wort you have made. When I transfer the wort to the fermenter [as I said anything up to 12 hours ater] I put the now active yeast in first [this has a very small amount of break material] and splash/aerate vigorously. I stop running out at the tap [22 - 23 litres] and leave the break material behind and there is a significant amount.

Fermentations have been just as active.

Final gravities have been as expected and absolutely no off flavours.

You need to be confident in your sanitation methods but apart from that it is easy.

Steve
 

JasonY

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Thanks for the replies, I ended up racking after a few hours which seems to have seperated a lot of the break out. Will try the idea of chucking a liter of the wort in the starter to get it aclimatised, usually just feed it up on DME.
 

chiller

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Perhaps I should explain.

I make up a 300 ml or more starter at about 1.040 and get the starter at full fermentatation and then on brewday add the litre of actual wort to it.

Steve
 

JasonY

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Thanks chiller, that is what I thought you meant :)
 

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