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Whirlfloc in Extract

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Cloud Surfer

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I’ve read conflicting information about using Whirlfloc in extract brewing. Is there any reason NOT to use it. There’s some suggestion it interacts poorly with the proteins in the extract. I’m looking for clearer wort/beer without stuffing the aroma and taste in the final product.
 

Vini2ton

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Have you tried using post-ferment finings such as gelatine? Cold-crashing before kegging or bottling.
 

MHB

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Carrageenan (the main active ingredient) in Whirlfloc and the like acts on Proteins and protein complexes like hot break. Gelatin/s (well some of them) doesn't, it causes yeast to clump faster so it sinks faster (Stokes Law).
The two aren't related and aren't removing the same products.

Its going to come down to a bunch of questions like, was the wort that made up the extract fully boiled before concentrating, what's its protein and lipid content, are you boiling at full volume, are you adding more ingredients that need fining (sugar and some adjunct don't, some do).
Another one of those asking what looks like a simple question, which isn't - nor can the answer be. You need some proteins especially in selected size ranges, these are important for body and flavour in the beer, for head formation, and as a yeast nutrient. We want to remove most of the lipids, except for some that yeast needs...

Short answer is I suppose if you have a lot of break in your boil it will help it to drop it out if you use a kettle fining.
Personally I use BrewBright, it has a refined form of Carrageenan (Kappa) and PVPP that helps remove polyphenols which are the other half of the haze forming and many of the staling processes that happen in beer.
Mark
 

Cloud Surfer

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Have you tried using post-ferment finings such as gelatine? Cold-crashing before kegging or bottling.
I used some finings on my first brew of Belgium Triple, but it didn’t do a great job. Next up I’ll try cold crashing for 2 or 3 days I think.
 

Cloud Surfer

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Carrageenan (the main active ingredient) in Whirlfloc and the like acts on Proteins and protein complexes like hot break. Gelatin/s (well some of them) doesn't, it causes yeast to clump faster so it sinks faster (Stokes Law).
The two aren't related and aren't removing the same products.

Its going to come down to a bunch of questions like, was the wort that made up the extract fully boiled before concentrating, what's its protein and lipid content, are you boiling at full volume, are you adding more ingredients that need fining (sugar and some adjunct don't, some do).
Another one of those asking what looks like a simple question, which isn't - nor can the answer be. You need some proteins especially in selected size ranges, these are important for body and flavour in the beer, for head formation, and as a yeast nutrient. We want to remove most of the lipids, except for some that yeast needs...

Short answer is I suppose if you have a lot of break in your boil it will help it to drop it out if you use a kettle fining.
Personally I use BrewBright, it has a refined form of Carrageenan (Kappa) and PVPP that helps remove polyphenols which are the other half of the haze forming and many of the staling processes that happen in beer.
Mark
Oh man I knew it wasn’t going to be an easy answer. Stuff on the internet is all over the place. I’ll skip the Whirlfloc for know until I’ve got more experience, and see if cold crashing works for me.
 

Quokka42

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It isn't that difficult - if extract only it will not help, as the break has already been performed. If a partial mash, it won't make any difference if extract is present, as the break has already been performed.
 

Cloud Surfer

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It isn't that difficult - if extract only it will not help, as the break has already been performed. If a partial mash, it won't make any difference if extract is present, as the break has already been performed.
Thanks. I’ll forget about for now, and re visit it when I get to AG brewing.
 

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