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Feldon

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Anybody still wearing an old pair of Amco jeans?

A bit of musical Australianana from 1981 for Australia Day.

 

Feldon

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And just to bring a bit of class to you beer swilling yobbos, here's a cultured Paul Hogan with "Boris and the boys in the band" back in the 1970s flogging fags (for American readers, that doesn't mean beating up shirt-lifters - it's Australian for 'selling cigarettes').

Let 'er rip Boris...

 

Feldon

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A US clean energy blog says John Fogerty was prescient in crafting his lyrics for Have You Ever Seen The Rain?. Interesting Cajun name for sun showers.

Did a rock band explain why wind power will work in the south, 45 years ago?

If you’re a Creedence Clearwater Revival (CCR) fan, you know their bread and butter is all things southern. Bayous, catfish jumpin’, hurricanes a blowin’ and a bad moon rising…well, you get the gist. But think about this CCR song for a spell: Have you ever seen the rain? Lyrics:

Someone told me long ago
There’s a calm before the storm,
I know; it’s been comin’ for some time.
When it’s over, so they say,

It’ll rain a sunny day,
I know; shinin’ down like water.
I want to know, have you ever seen the rain?

I want to know, have you ever seen the rain
Comin’ down on a sunny day?


If you take the song literally, have you ever seen it rain when it’s sunny outside? If you’ve lived in the south much, chances are pretty good that you have. But it’s a less frequent phenomenon in other parts of the country. For the majority of Americans, they have no special term for when the rain falls and the sun is shining. Here in the south, that phenomenon is frequently referred to as the “devil beating his wife.” The origin may be from a French phrase, and as the French Acadians (Cajuns) settled in Louisiana, the southernism spread through the south following the rivers and bayous. As a more politically correct alternative, the phenomenon may also be called a “sun shower.”


Did a rock band explain why wind power will work in the south, 45 years ago? - SACE | Southern Alliance for Clean Energy
 

Osangar

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well, I'm currently listing to 96fm online. it's terrific; I'm in Singapore, it reminds me of home. then after a few pints of my current brew, I start jumping about to old hits.
 

Feldon

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Makes me want to put a flower in my hair and sing give peace a chance! Great song but as John Fogerty explains it was all about class and elitism.
Quote from Wiki.
The song has been widely used to protest against military actions as well as elitism in a broader sense in Western society, particularly in the United States; as an added consequence of its popularity, it has even been used in completely unrelated situations, such as to advertise blue jeans.[13] It was played at a campaign rally for Donald Trump, who was himself an example of the subject of the song, the "fortunate son" of wealth, according to Fogerty.[14] Fogerty later issued a cease and desist order, again noting that Trump obtained a draft deferment.[15]

Bruce Springsteen, Dave Grohl, and Zac Brown attracted criticism when they performed the song together at the November 2014 Concert for Valor in Washington D.C.. Fogerty, a military veteran, defended their song choice.[16]
A lot of songs, and poetry, that reference war are sometimes misunderstood in terms of what the writer's intent was. But everyone is entitled to make their own interpretation and take from a song what they want. That is, after all, what art is supposed to do.

Here Fogerty explains in a 5 minute interview how he today interprets his lyrics to Fortunate Son. What he doesn't refer to is the marketing value of creating an anti Vietnam war song at the time. It was a huge money spinner. The Vietnam war was very unpopular with young people at the time and they bought into songs that spoke to their beliefs. War, it seems, is more acceptable now, particularly since the end of conscription. And also because governments/military restrict free access to war correspondents, which means that graphic coverage of the horrors of war at the front line (as shown daily in 1960s TV news coverage) is not broadcast today about Iraq, Afghanistan etc.

 
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YAPN

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Getting off topic, I know,but...

"graphic coverage of the horrors of war at the front line... is not broadcast today about Iraq, Afghanistan etc."

That's what Wikileaks did and look what happened.
 

Feldon

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The Devil's Daughters.

Just right for a sultry Sunday.

 

Feldon

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I've always loved this song. And I like the way these guys do it. A song that can be carried on the bass line alone, if the vocals are good enough. These are.

Roger Miller's King of the Road.

 

Feldon

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I've always loved this song. And I like the way these guys do it. A song that can be carried on the bass line alone, if the vocals are good enough. These are.

Roger Miller's King of the Road.

Released just a few days ago is this 2004 interview with Bob Moore, the bassist who created the bass line for the original recording of King of the Road. He plays it on his old acoustic bass at the start of the interview.

 

Feldon

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The Linda Ronstadt Experience is a newish tribute act for the said great female vocalist.


Tristan McIntosh, a former finalist in the TV show ‘American Idol’, not only looks and dresses like Linda, but most importantly sounds like her too. Which is really something, because Linda was a real belter. Alas Linda’s health doesn’t allow her to sing anymore, so a quality tribute act is the best you can get live.

Here’s a time-stamped list of some of Linda’s famous tracks sung by Tristan to see how she compares. Blue Bayou is a real test of vocal strength that she passes well IMO. And Different Drum is a great song that wanders all up and down the scale and is also a good test passed well.

3:00 Silver Threads and Golden Needles
12:05 It’s so Easy
56:20 I Will Always Love You
59:51 Just One Look
1:03:05 Blue Bayou
1:08:07 That’ll Be the Day
1:15:25 You’re No Good
1:22:02 When Will I Be Loved
1:25:36 Heat Wave
1:29:19 Different Drum

(The audio is not the best in this live recording, and the backing band might not be all together all the time - but that’s kind of authentic because that’s what it was sometimes like for Linda and her band, the Stone[d] Ponies)
 

Feldon

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Kris Kristofferson has left the stage.

And as the man once said, I'll trade all my tomorrows, for a single yesterday...

Was very quietly announced a month ago. He is 84 years old and has contracted Lyme disease (a bacterial infection acquired by tick bite).

Otis Gibbs made this short video describing the announcement and the man's life and achievements.


And here's one of my favorite live versions of one of my favorite KK songs (and there's so many).
Best Of All Possible Worlds - wonderful rolling lyrics that envelope despair with optimism, and a great band of greats (love the harmonica in this).

 

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