Ways to purify and sterilise water

Discussion in 'Water' started by maclarkson, 11/10/17.

 

  1. rude

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    Posted 12/10/17 at 1:01 PM
    He wants another way to sterilise water
    I think he is doing a bit of reading which is good
    Hey Mac how do you brew ?
    Do you all grain , partial or K&K
    I think I brew better beers using an R/O filter system but say I was in Melbourne I wouldnt use one
     
  2. manticle

    Standing up for the Aussie Bottler Moderating

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    Posted 12/10/17 at 1:20 PM
    Yes but sterilise has a very specific meaning.

    It's not remotely the same as dropping out minerals which is not the same as removing chlorine.

    Need clarification, preferably from OP in order to provide useful information specific to the question being asked
     
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  3. RdeVjun

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    Posted 12/10/17 at 10:05 PM
    Context is important, no critical here in fact. Need more information about the OP's application, it will make a considerable difference to the validity of any answers.
    Eg. Cleaning up manky rainwater for a kit or ROing for AG, both have a particular purpose in the right context but in no way could they be swapped and achieve the same ends. Seeing as we're in the recipe & ingredients/ water subforum then it's not obvious what the application is.
    So, over to you mate, tell us exactly what you are doing?
     
  4. Adr_0

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 1:09 AM
    I have used the Pureau a lot for paler beers to dilute my moderate water (eg 10L out of 30L) but what is your logic for using it with yeast, given there should be some trace Ca and Zn? Just because there's no chlorine and it's convenient or something else?
     
  5. maclarkson

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 5:57 AM
     
  6. maclarkson

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 5:58 AM
    Will use the potassium then
     
  7. Adr_0

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 6:13 AM
    So while you're here... What are you trying to achieve?
     
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  8. MHB

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 6:36 AM
    Its sterile - as is in IV grade sterile and completely free of any other chemicals, I have seen the seven step process they use.
    So it is a blank slate, and yes if you want anything in it, you have to add it. One of the good quality yeast nutrients on the market will give the yeast everything it needs in terms of trace elements given that it is mostly autolysed yeast (soylent green for yeast) and a good supply of Nitrogen (DAP).
    It is also convenient and reasonably inexpensive (well compared to setting up a modulab water supply) - also tastes great, I drink a lot more of it than I use for yeast.
    Mark
     
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  9. Adr_0

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 7:26 AM
    Yeah it's great to have a 5L or 10L on the counter. I figured it must be packaged pretty close to sterile but wasn't aware of the process - I just assumed chlorine removal, UF, RO, deionise and pasteurise. Tastes great whatever they've done... I should use it for rehydration, should get my hands on some nutrient and should figure out my zinc levels. I generally use a Coopers lager tin in the fridge for making starters and rehydrate with dechlorinated tap water.
     
  10. garage_life

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 8:58 AM
    Asorbic acid is AKA citric acid if I remember reading food ingredients lists right?
     
  11. MHB

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    Posted 13/10/17 at 9:23 AM
    Not even close, Wikipedia is just a click away - I suggest you have a look at the two chemicals then you will "know" the difference
    Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid.
    Mark
     
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  12. garage_life

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    Posted 15/10/17 at 2:13 AM
    Sorry, my bad! Vitamin C, I knew I'd looked it up before at some point
     

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