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Stopping yeast post ferment

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adamsec

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I want to stop yeast activity after fermentation is finished, I was just wondering what is the best way to inhibit the yeast without needing to undergo heavy filtration?

Thanks
 

wide eyed and legless

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I want to stop yeast activity after fermentation is finished, I was just wondering what is the best way to inhibit the yeast without needing to undergo heavy filtration?

Thanks
Wine makers use potassium sorbate when back sweetening but pretty sure it doesn't kill the yeast, or stop it fermenting, so they probably do something else along with it.
 

kadmium

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I want to stop yeast activity after fermentation is finished, I was just wondering what is the best way to inhibit the yeast without needing to undergo heavy filtration?

Thanks
Potassium metabisulphate will scrub any oxygen and inhibit yeast in conjunction with potassium sorbate as WEAL said.

Essentially the sorbate "coats" the yeast and inhibits yeast growth in conjunction with the KMETA which reduces oxygen and prevents yeast from building back up.

It's not bullet proof but is pretty reliable when done right. To really do it correctly you should know the free so2 in solution but you can use PH to help determine additions.

For instance a pH of 4 would require 3-4g for 20L but a pH of 3.5 only needs about 1 so you should really know the pH to work out your KMETA additions.

Sorbate it based on alcohol % with a 15% mead it's around 50mg/l and at 10% about 200mg/l so the lower the ABV the more you need.

Bear in mind, this probably won't stop an active fermentation it is used to stabilise a product prior to backsweetening most often used in mead making.

It also needs to be done after fermentation is over and the mead has clarified a fair bit, and after you rack it off the gross lees.
 

MHB

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Out of curiosity, why?
What are you trying to achieve by stopping yeast activity.
Mark
 

adamsec

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Trying to help one particular mate who enjoys drinking my beers however farts up a storm for the next week afterwards.

My thought is it is the leftover yeast in the beer then fermenting in his gut on other sugars in his diet - if I can reduce or remove the yeast maybe it will prevent it?

I did wonder if commercial brewery's filter for this purpose but that just wouldn't work for hazy ales and other thick styles
 

MHB

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Interesting
Couple of thoughts, Haze can be yeast haze as in Hefeweizen, or it can be hop oils in massively late hopped beers, Glucan haze from things like flaked grain, Protein haze. Not all haze is yeast so it would be good to look at the style of beer you are making.

Long very cold Lagering, especially if you use good quality appropriate fining agents would I suspect do more good than trying to "de-activate" the yeast ( I would look at Isinglass and/or Silica xerogel). Fair chance that when the beer goes into the stomach... the change in pH and concentration would allow any surviving yeast to re-activate.

Along with Lagering, your yeast choices could play a role, choose highly flocculant yeast look at say US-05 and S-04, the S-04 drops like a rock when its finished and leaves way lower cell counts in the finished, with Lagering and fining this should be close to zero.
There are also some fairly affordable filtration options, I know you said you wanted to avoid heavy filtration, but a sterile paper plate and frame filter like those sold to home wine makers might be worth a look, especially if the beer is well clarified first.
I can do keg to keg filtration down to sterile (lots of grades of paper to choose from), just set it up and walk away for a couple of hours.

Mind you very little yeast should make it to the intestines alive, not a medical diagnosis (not qualified) but there is a fair chance that he is having a reaction to Gluten rather than yeast. He might be well advised to see is doctor and have that conversation.
Good Luck, Mark
 

Vini2ton

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Pasteurisation. Check out how big brewers go about their stuff. Product must be stable and uniform.
 

FarsideOfCrazy

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I do know a pro brewer who does this with a beer he makes and I'll ask him. He told me once before what he adds to kill the yeast but I can't remember.
 

bird

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Have you thought about trying clarity Ferm? Don't believe it affects the yeast but breaks down the gluten and I have had a few mates who have no known gluten issues comment on my beer not bloating them like other beers do. Would definitely help If it's coming from an unknown gluten sensitivity.
 

Sidney Harbour-Bridge

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I have used asafoetida in Indian cooking as it is supposed to reduce flatulence, cold it be used in beer, maybe it is the secret ingredient in Kingfisher lager?
 

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