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Questions for filterers.

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Dave70

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Ever since seeing the Mythbusters episode where confirmed you can improve the flavor of cheap vodka by filtering it, I've been curious to see how my brews compare after running em through a strainer.
Ok, its apples and oranges I know, but I've had a surplus filter unit laying about and thought why not.

So.

What size (micron) filter gives the best results?

Do you replace the filter every time or backwash, sanitize and re - use?

What type - pleated fabric, string wound ect.?

Do you need pressure transfer or will gravity do the work?

Do you filter all your beers?

Do you need to use it in conjunction with other methods, finings, polyclar to get the best results?

Does it have an effect on beer stability, by which I mean makes the beer taste good, longer and / or preserve hop character? Which likely isn't even the definition of stability at all..

Did you once filter and decide it wasn't worth the bother?

Conversely, did you begin and conclude it was totally worth it an wish you'd been doing it for years?

Would you recommend it to others?



Cheers.
 

dago001

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Dave70 said:
Ever since seeing the Mythbusters episode where confirmed you can improve the flavor of cheap vodka by filtering it, I've been curious to see how my brews compare after running em through a strainer.
Ok, its apples and oranges I know, but I've had a surplus filter unit laying about and thought why not.

So.

What size (micron) filter gives the best results?
I use .45 generaĺly. I have also used .25, mainly for lagers.

Do you replace the filter every time or backwash, sanitize and re - use?
Backwash. I also have a homemade system to clean/flush the filter. Needs some more work to get it right though.

What type - pleated fabric, string wound ect.?
Pleated fabric.

Do you need pressure transfer or will gravity do the work?
Pressure. Not set up for gravity, although I know of some that do.

Do you filter all your beers?
No. Mainly lagers. Sometimes APAs

Do you need to use it in conjunction with other methods, finings, polyclar to get the best results?
I either filter or I don't. CC the beers that I don't filter. No adjuncts in my beers.

Does it have an effect on beer stability, by which I mean makes the beer taste good, longer and / or preserve hop character? Which likely isn't even the definition of stability at all..
No difference that I can tell.

Did you once filter and decide it wasn't worth the bother?
No

Conversely, did you begin and conclude it was totally worth it an wish you'd been doing it for years?
Kind of.

Would you recommend it to others?
Only if you have the time and patience.


Cheers.
 

MetalRooster

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Dave70 said:
Ever since seeing the Mythbusters episode where confirmed you can improve the flavor of cheap vodka by filtering it, I've been curious to see how my brews compare after running em through a strainer.
Ok, its apples and oranges I know, but I've had a surplus filter unit laying about and thought why not.

So.

What size (micron) filter gives the best results?
Have only ever used 1 micron.

Do you replace the filter every time or backwash, sanitize and re - use?
backwash, napisan, solid rinse, backwash, gladwrap, freeze, re-use

What type - pleated fabric, string wound ect.?
pleated fabric

Do you need pressure transfer or will gravity do the work?
Have done both. gravity is totally fine if you have the space and time. when i'm lazy i pressure transfer

Do you filter all your beers?
I don't for porters or stouts or anything really dark, but everything else does

Do you need to use it in conjunction with other methods, finings, polyclar to get the best results?
i generally crash chill all beers and then filter, have stopped using all other fining agents (except kettle finings)

Does it have an effect on beer stability, by which I mean makes the beer taste good, longer and / or preserve hop character? Which likely isn't even the definition of stability at all..
Can't really say, have never done a siude by side comparison

Did you once filter and decide it wasn't worth the bother?
never. i'm glad everytime I filter

Conversely, did you begin and conclude it was totally worth it an wish you'd been doing it for years?
I bought my filter as i did a 60L batch for my brother in laws wedding (IPA). I had overpitched (used trub from a 20L "starter" brew) and the result was muddy creek water. I though no-one is going to drink this, so fingers crossed a filter will help. OMFG it was soooo clear and awesome.

Would you recommend it to others?
Yes. I have recommended it and they all do it now too.


Cheers.
 

Parks

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I did for ages but stopped once I started using Brewbrite. Most beers are crystal clear within 4 weeks max.

I would if I were entering a comp and the style required crystal clear to brilliant but otherwise not.
 

squirt in the turns

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Purge the filter system, lines, etc, and obviously the receiving keg with CO2. My filter housing for some reason never fills entirely with liquid, so I'm much happier knowing that the gas bubbling around in there is carbon dioxide, not oxygen.

A pro brewer once explained his purging process to me: bring the vessel/system to be purged to 2 Bar under CO2 pressure. The original atmospheric contents of the system are now joined by an equal amount of pure CO2 (assuming you're at sea level), meaning the oxygen content of the system is reduced from 20% to 10%. Release pressure and repeat - O2 is at 5%, once more and it's at 2.5%, and so on until you're no longer paranoid about oxidation.

The method I actually normally employ is to fill the whole assembly with Starsan, then push it out using CO2. That way you can be certain you've displaced the entire volume of the filter and lines with CO2, although it's a bit more stuffing around. Probably slightly less wasteful of CO2 too.
 

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