Quantcast

My malting procedure

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

tubbsy

Well-Known Member
Joined
19/12/20
Messages
54
Reaction score
35
Location
West Coast, Tasmania
Yeah, this will be my first go at a crystal malt. Roasted malts are fairly straight forward in the air frier, with the exception of the very dark malts which require greater temps and/or extra care to not catch fire. Most of what I've made so far has been done at 180°C for an hour and smells delicious. A quick guide can be found here.
 

MHB

Well-Known Member
Joined
1/10/05
Messages
6,235
Reaction score
3,709
Location
Newcastle
Crystal is mashed in the corn, at home I would consider taking green malt (after sprouting but before drying) and BIAB it, then drain, dry and kiln, temperature and time of kilning is mostly what determines colour.
Stewed malts (Vienna, Munich... Aromatic, Biscuit) are heated up late in the sprouting process to encourage melanoidins, then dried and kilned, hotter kilning for darker versions. In the old floor malting days they would at the end of sprouting, heap up the malt and cover it with tarpaulins so it got hot and high in CO2.
Amber to Black are just malt dried then kilned at higher and higher temperatures. The term Black Patent is because to get true black malt there was a fair chance of the malt catching fire, some one "Patent" a drum roaster that made it a safer and controlled process, there days fires in maltings are pretty rare, mind you Joe White burnt down one of theirs a decade or so ago.
Malt is one of the primary ingredients in brewing, knowing a bit about malt helps us choose the right malt for the job at hand, its also a real craft/science in its own right. Lots to learn and it would be fun to play around with if I had the time.
Big ups tubbsy, hope it works well for you.
Mark
 

tubbsy

Well-Known Member
Joined
19/12/20
Messages
54
Reaction score
35
Location
West Coast, Tasmania
I ended up visiting a homebrew shop today that I only just found out about in Somerset who stock grains. Picked up a 25kg bag of Coopers Pale Malt (half the price of Maris Otter!) that I'll use as my base and use my home malted grains to make specialty malts. I could see myself having to have a batch malting at all times and that just isn't feasible. Now I should be able to do several batches a year (will try for mostly in winter) and maybe give some of those stewed malts a go.
 

postmaster

Well-Known Member
Joined
19/10/14
Messages
46
Reaction score
16
That looks awesome! Is that an air frier you've mounted on the door?
Tubbsy. No its a halogen turbo oven I see K-Mart have them for $45 at the moment Make sure you get the 1300 Watt one. I dry at 40 60 deg C and than Kiln at 80 deg C for 3 to 5 hrs. I just judge by the look of the grain and if its hard to bite into. Should be about 3% moisture
I think I have had it heat to 85 deg no sure if it would heat much higher, but thats okay for Pale Ale
 

postmaster

Well-Known Member
Joined
19/10/14
Messages
46
Reaction score
16
Postmaster well done what a set up. Your issue of having germination temperature overun can be controlled by chilled misting water like the commercial sprouters use. I think they run their water chillers around 16c. I have to step back because before I know it I will be considering building my own sprouter! LOL
Malted Mick. Yes. Sounds like you are a tinkerer like myself, you get the bug and keep going. I am thinking along these lines. Using a Extractor fan so it blows air in the top of the Machine (Replacing the Ozito blower) This moves about 180 CFM. I would run ducting through a jockey box that I could keep cold water in and it hopefully would chill the air as it draws through and than blows into the machine. Not sure if it would work, so its just a thought in process. Other wise back to malting in Cooler weather. You really do not want too much moisture when its germination. Just enough to make sure the husks do not dry out.
 

Attachments

Latest posts

Top