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Coopers new malting,

Discussion in 'In The News' started by lost at sea, 5/1/18.

 

  1. lost at sea

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    Posted 5/1/18
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  2. DU99

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    Posted 5/1/18
    20kg bags
     
  3. wereprawn

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  4. captain crumpet

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    Posted 5/1/18
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  5. Jack of all biers

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  6. Danscraftbeer

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    Posted 7/1/18
    I'll be into that stuff. Despite how being Australian doesn't get us better prices considering no import costs etc... I wonder what discounted price other countries pay for it :rolleyes:
     
  7. Crakkers

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    Posted 10/1/18
  8. MattC

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    Posted 11/7/18
    Does anyone have any info on how these malts go? I am interested in the schooner malt as it says it has a lower attenuation, which I'm assuming is due to lower diastatic power. Would like to know what the general consensus is out there?
     
  9. wessmith

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    Posted 11/7/18
    Schooner barley and hence the resulting malt is a low attenuating malt intended to leave some body in the wort for sugar brewing. Diastatic power should be around 150 to 200 depending on who malted the barley and has nothing to do with the attenuation of the malt. Just lots of unfermentable dextrins left after mashing which is OK when you have 20% or so sugar adjunct. Have not seen Coopers spec but cant see it will be any different from other offerings.
     
  10. MattC

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    Posted 11/7/18
    I was basing my comment about diastatic power on this quote from the Coopers Malting Manager..."“Schooner was superseded because the export markets required high levels of enzymes and Schooner had low levels so it wasn’t meeting the requirements but now the craft industry has grown they are looking for that lower enzyme again and it fits the bill really well,” Dr Stewart said."

    I took this to mean that the possible yield of fermentable sugars is lower, which is due to lower enzymes and therefor diastatic power. Could one attempt to mash lower to compensate this if it turns out that yield is too low at normal mashing temps?

    Cheers
     
  11. wessmith

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    Posted 11/7/18
    Lets not confuse attenuation which relates to fermentation, with conversion which relates to mashing and the production of a range of mostly fermentable sugars. I dont quite know what Doug Stewart is trying to say in that attributed comment but there is plenty of diastase in Schooner and why any craft brewer would be looking for "lower diastatic power" puzzles me. Malt yields are clearly defined in the specification provided by the maltster as "extract potential" and Schooner is no different from any other malt. What is different is the fermentability of the wort produced, which will contain dextrins that are not readily fermentable unless converted into simpler sugars by the use of artificial enzyme additions. Mainstream brewers use copious amounts of adjuncts in brewing like sugar and look to the retained dextrin component in the wort to provide body and mouthfeel to balance out the final beer. As regards mashing temps, Schooner is pretty impervious to any attempts to produce a more attenuable wort, at least in my experience. Whether you mash at 65 or 70 is not going to make a lot of difference to the fermentation final gravity - and that is the characteristic that brewers are looking for.
     
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  12. MHB

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    Posted 12/7/18
    From the Ellerslie website
    upload_2018-7-12_9-37-44.png
    Just another bog standard moderately kilned example of an Ale malt. Not saying it doesn't look good just nothing exceptional.
    I cut my brewing teeth on Adelaide Malt, the maltings Coopers owned, then sold to Joe White before they built this one.
    My recollections of Schooner from back then accord with Wes's. Its great malt for making a beer just like Coopers, its very reliable (if you want to make Coopers) and your chances of getting it to make much of anything else = 0.
    I'd be happy to brew with it, but I wouldn't be busting a nut to get my hands on it, I remember back in the day, with freight it was costing me about $65- /bag landed, 25 years later we are still paying about the same for quality Australian base malt (good times) and we have a hell of a lot more choices.
    Mark
     

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