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Bubbles in beer line after the keg and before Faucet

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Grott

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Beer flat, foaming badly when you pour a beer. Sounds like your've over carbonated the keg thus co2 coming out of solution so to speak, causing foaming and beer to be flat as loss of co2.

How did you carbonate your keg?
To check if over carbonated, disconnect gas from keg, release all gas from keg using pressure release valve, wait a couple of hours and check if co2 comes out of the valve again. If so do this a couple of times ( release gas) until not much comes out then connect gas line and set at serving pressure say 8psi. After 24 hours hopefully all will be well.
Cheers:cheers:
 

Cyclic

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Thanks did as said and was over carbonated, Left the line at 1.5 meters and serving pressure of 14psi, awesome pic attached, "Pale Ale"
Force carbonation is not the way to go, my second keg is a week old at 14psi and gave it a soft shake or two in the evenings and heard the Co2 being excepted by the beer,Carbonation is almost correct, the taste and pour is miles a part from force carbonation.
 

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klangers

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1.5 metres is too short for 14 PSI. 14PSI is on the high end of homebrew dispensing.

Here is the rule:
  1. Pick your carbonation level (in "volumes of CO2" - plenty of explanations online including an article written by yours truly)
  2. Pick your temperature. I go fairly low so I can have lower CO2 pressure and hence make my CO2 last further
  3. Then, look up a solubility chart for CO2 (again, all online) and infer the pressure necessary to achieve your chosen carbonation level at your chosen temperature.
  4. This is then your serving pressure. If you go higher than this, your beer will gradually get fizzier and won't work. If you go lower than this, the opposite occurs. You have to tune your line length to suit your serving pressure, not the other way around
 

Grott

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Some people get into trouble by increasing the serving pressure to duplicate the pouring speed seen in hotels etc. In general you have a home set up which needs to be treated as such and balancing your system per klangers post will get you good results. In pouring speed I'm not talking about dribbling out but a good steady rate is achievable.
 

goatchop41

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Another user from AHB, Crozdog, uploaded an excel calculator for balancing your system. It will tell you the necessary line length and psi, depending on your desired volumes of CO2 and the ID of your beer line.
It can be found here (post #25)
 

Cyclic

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Guys do you take into account the height above sea level when setting the carbonation level, as I'm sitting in Pretoria at 5558" above sea level.
Saw somewhere to add 0.5psi for every 2000" above sea level!
 

klangers

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The table published together with that article can't be right. For starters, the last four cells would suggest that both 3/8" and 5/16" lines hold the same volume of beer.
Well spotted.

It was right when I wrote the article, i can't say what the editor did. The article is very much dumbed down from the original submission I made, and it looks like during the reformatting the last two cells were duplicated.
 

klangers

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Guys do you take into account the height above sea level when setting the carbonation level, as I'm sitting in Pretoria at 5558" above sea level.
Saw somewhere to add 0.5psi for every 2000" above sea level!
Hi mate, yeah it will affect your pressure readings, UNLESS your pressure gauges are calibrated for atmospheric pressure at that altitude (they won't be).
 

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