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Snow

Beer me up, Scotty!
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To all you water chemistry gurus,

I am making a porter tonight, and I had heard that salt enhances the "sweetness" of a porter. So, I got onto Brewater and tried to calculate modifications to Brisbane water to try and match London Well water. Trouble is, when I add more "canning salt" (NaCl), sure it brings the sodium levels up to scratch, but it puts the chlorine levels through the roof. Anyway, it got me thinking whether normal table salt is the same as sea salt? i.e does sea salt also have the same chlorine levels as table salt? Is there something else I can add that might bring up the sodium levels but not affect the other variables? I know baking soda can contribute sodium, but it also brings the carbonates and alkalinity up too high.

Cheers - Snow
 

Kai

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sea salt will contain the same levels of chlorine, possibly higher relative to sodium thanks to other impurities but don't quote me on that.
 

GMK

BrewInn Barossa:~ Home to GMKenterprises ~
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here is what u need - been told taht it is safe - but never used it - i know of people who use itas a mouth wash...

sodium (I) peroxide
Formula as commonly written: Na2O2
Hill system formula: Na2O2
CAS registry number: [1313-60-6]
Formula weight: 77.978
Class: oxide
Synonyms
sodium (I) peroxide
sodium peroxide
Physical properties
Colour: pale yellow
Appearance: solid
Melting point: 675C
Boiling point: decomposes
Density: 2805 kg m-3
Element analysis and oxidation numbers
For each compound, and where possible, a formal oxidation number for each element is given, but the usefulness of this number is limited, especially so for p-block elements in particular. Based upon that oxidation number, an electronic configuration is also given but note that for more exotic compounds you should view this as a guide only.
 

SteveSA

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I'm no chemist but isn't Sodium Peroxide corrosive and toxic?
 

Ross

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Snow,

not sure where the sweetness comes in, but I add a teaspoon of table salt to all my brews - I think it enhances the flavour, but I guess it's a matter of opinion - I've tried 2 teaspoons before, but I believe this is too much as you can just start to dectect it on your pallette...
 

Tim

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If you are trying to match London water, you might want to consider sodium bicarbonate (baking soda). This will increase the levels of carbonates and sodium. Sodium apparently enhances sweetness, and carbonates and sulfates enhance bitterness.
 
J

Jovial_Monk

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Possibly a teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate instead of salt? London water is supposed to be high in carbonates IIRC

Jovial Monk
 

Snow

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Thanks guys. I think I'll add 1/4 tsp of salt and 1/2 tsp bicarb and see how I go.

Cheers - Snow
 

barfridge

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Why not add pure sodium? It would sure get your brewday started with a bang when you throw it in the water.

(disclaimer: dont actually do this, bad things will happen)
 

warrenlw63

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How about some MSG? For that beer on steroids effect.

Owwwww.... My migraine is killing me. :wacko:

Warren -
 

bradmcm

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Adding carbonates/bicarbonates?????

Breweries spend big money trying to remove it.
Gee whiz, you guys...
 

Snow

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bradmcm said:
Adding carbonates/bicarbonates?????

Breweries spend big money trying to remove it.
Gee whiz, you guys...
[post="62138"][/post]​
Not the ones making porter methinks.

- Snow
 

Tim

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biacarbonates react with acid (ie from dark grains) to release carbon dioxide gas and water. Bicarbonate isnt an ion you would usually find in aqeuos solution due to the dissociation of water.
 

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