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Chillhaze And Cold Conditioning

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hamstringsally

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ran a trial and put some long necks away in the fridge ( 3 deg) for about 10 days thinking it would improve the flavor and today tried one out of the fridge to another one from the same batch at room temp in the shed. (10 deg)

funny thing is i was expecting the cold conditioned one to come up smoother but actually made the beer more bitter and in a way tiny bit offensive in terms of bitterness and dryness.
I did mash at 62 so always was going to be a dry beer but just trying to get my head around cold conditioning.
are the cold conditioned ones the true reading? ( do i tweak my recipe off the CCbottles? )
also always heard about chill haze but the two long necks i opened out of the fridge were cloudy and the room temp was really clear?

:blink:

any ideas?

cheers
 

black_labb

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chill haze doesn't show until the beer is cold. If you chilled the room temp ones down they would be cloudy if not cloudier as they didn't have the time cold conditioning.
 

black_labb

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Precipitation. As the beer cools down the proteins that cause chill haze are no longer soluble in the beer and essentially are a bunch of solids floating in the beer. If the beer stays at a low temperature these floating solids eventually sink to the bottom leaving clear beer on top. To get the clearest beer possible crash chill and leave your beer at a temperature at or below serving temperature for that beer so that all the chill haze drops out of the beer.
 

yum beer

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Try and keep your bottles in the fridge for at least a week before drinking, makes a huge difference, no chill haze(or very little at worst) and much

cleaner and smoother tasting.



What style of beer are you referring to, Lagers served at 3-4c, Ales at 7-10c for best flavour profile, perhaps the beers you are trying are better
off at 10c served from the garage...just like 'cellar temp'.
 

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