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Young Henry's Newtowner Pale Ale - AG Recipe

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Klarko

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Hi all,

Looking fro some input into this recipe (Attached) for a YH Newtowner - https://www.younghenrys.com/newtowner

Fair bit of info on the brewery website so am able to nail it down reasonably well for the grain bill I'm wondering of anyone has attempted this beer with any success.

I'm using hop substitution as I have a lot of hops to choose from. Any thoughts appreciated.
 

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Michael2015

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Hi Klarko

I have had two attempts at this and I think the second one came close.....

It is a BIAB AG recipe

2.25Kg Ale Malt (Barret Burston)
2.25Kg Ale - Maris Otter Malt (Bairds)
250gms Carahell (Weyermann)
250gms Crystal Malt Pale (Bairds)

Mash in at 69C
Mash out at 75 over 7 mins

Hop schedule
5g galaxy 60 mins
20g galaxy 15 mins
5g cascade 15 mins
5g vic secret 15 mins
20g cascade (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g galaxy (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g vic secret (steep/whirlpool) flameout

US05 safale

dry hop
30g Cascade
15g galaxy
15g vic secret
 

///

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It's all Aussie hops and the original had oats and a mix of Cali and London ale. Now more an Aussie pale.
 

Peety117

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Hi Klarko

I have had two attempts at this and I think the second one came close.....

It is a BIAB AG recipe

2.25Kg Ale Malt (Barret Burston)
2.25Kg Ale - Maris Otter Malt (Bairds)
250gms Carahell (Weyermann)
250gms Crystal Malt Pale (Bairds)

Mash in at 69C
Mash out at 75 over 7 mins

Hop schedule
5g galaxy 60 mins
20g galaxy 15 mins
5g cascade 15 mins
5g vic secret 15 mins
20g cascade (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g galaxy (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g vic secret (steep/whirlpool) flameout

US05 safale

dry hop
30g Cascade
15g galaxy
15g vic secret
Cheers for this, I'm going to try this one for my first biab!
 

xtiandiybeer

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Hi Klarko

I have had two attempts at this and I think the second one came close.....

It is a BIAB AG recipe
2.25Kg Ale Malt (Barret Burston)
2.25Kg Ale - Maris Otter Malt (Bairds)
250gms Carahell (Weyermann)
250gms Crystal Malt Pale (Bairds)

Mash in at 69C
Mash out at 75 over 7 mins

Hop schedule
5g galaxy 60 mins
20g galaxy 15 mins
5g cascade 15 mins
5g vic secret 15 mins
20g cascade (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g galaxy (steep/whirlpool) flameout
5g vic secret (steep/whirlpool) flameout

US05 safale

dry hop
30g Cascade
15g galaxy
15g vic secret
Is this a 25L batch size?
 

paddy.odwyer

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Hi all,

Looking fro some input into this recipe (Attached) for a YH Newtowner - https://www.younghenrys.com/newtowner

Fair bit of info on the brewery website so am able to nail it down reasonably well for the grain bill I'm wondering of anyone has attempted this beer with any success.

I'm using hop substitution as I have a lot of hops to choose from. Any thoughts appreciated.
Hi there Klarko,

I am very excited to try and attempt your recipe as a BIAB, but I was wondering if you would be so kind as to let me know some of your parameters for this brew (if you can remember them) so that I can adjust them to my set-up?

I see that your final batch size was 25L, so what was your strike water volume and pre-boil volume respectively? Did you mash for 60 mins? Did you sparge? And finally, when you refer to losses, do you mean from trub and siphoning, or does that also include your boil-off evaporation losses?

thanks for any help. Cheers, Paddy.
 

kadmium

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I would suggest that knowing his setup won't help you much.

You need to know your process, are you doing full volume? Mixed? Single vessel BIAB? Bag squeeze?

Most importantly you need to know your own brew house efficiency and then you simply adjust his grain bill for your equipment. Something like BrewFather or Beersmith can scale a recipe to final volume / BH efficiency for you.
 

paddy.odwyer

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I would suggest that knowing his setup won't help you much.

You need to know your process, are you doing full volume? Mixed? Single vessel BIAB? Bag squeeze?

Most importantly you need to know your own brew house efficiency and then you simply adjust his grain bill for your equipment. Something like BrewFather or Beersmith can scale a recipe to final volume / BH efficiency for you.
Thanks Kadmium,

I'm only on my fourth brew so still learning how to adapt to differing recipes and figuring out exactly what my efficiency is, so I appreciate the advice. I'm going to try and do a BIAB but with a more concentrated amount of water for the mash, and then batch sparge with the additional amount of water so that I reach close to the estimated preboil volume for this batch size. This is mainly because my kettle isn't big enough for a full volume mash. Would you mind telling me what type of process this is called, as I believe its fairly common, but I've always been given the exact volume amounts before, whereas this time I'm having to calculate those myself.

Cheers, and sorry if some of these questions seem confused or simply incorrect, like I said, still learning!
 

kadmium

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No need to apologise for learning mate!

So, I think it's a normal mash when you do a mash and sparge. It's called a full volume mash if you do the entire amount. It really depends on a number of variables as to how much water you need.

Grain will absorb roughly 1 Litre / 1 kg, so if you use 4kg of grain you will need 4L of water just to end up recovering what the grain absorbs.

You also need to know how much you evaporate during the boil, which will help determine how much water you need to start the boil with. This is your 'pre boil volume' and it differs depending on ambient temp, humidity, elevation, size of boil kettle, how vigorous you boil etc.

Then, to work out how much grain you need to start with, you need to know your efficiency. This means, if the recipe is designed for 75% efficiency, and you only get 60%, you will need to increase the grain amount. This increases how much water is absorbed, and thus how much you need to start with.

You also need to know how much is lost to your particular mash tun (if you can't recover some due to false bottoms or what not, and how much is lost to the kettle which you can't recover.

There are a number of other things which you need to factor in, which determine how much water you need in total, this is why I said you don't usually find a recipe that states "start with x litres of water" etc, because every system is different.

I know in my Guten, I will lose around 3L / Hour of boil, and I lose about 3.5L to trub and unrecovered kettle loss, which means if I want to end up with 21L in the fermenter, I start with 27.5L before I boil. If I know that I am using 5kg of grain, I need 5L ontop of the 27 which is around 32L. Therefore, if I start with 32L, I know I will end up with about 21L in the fermenter.

I also know with my system, that there is 6.5L of liquid under the false floor which doesn't make it to the grain, this is called 'recoverable' mash liquid, but does not factor into the water:grist ratio that you often see people talk about. A good rule of thumb is about 3L of water to every kilo of grain. So, I would need 15L for 5kg of grain, plus my 6.5L makes it 21.5L of water for my mash. I round up to 22L, which leaves 10L for sparging.

I hope this made sense for you?

The easiest way to dial in your process over time is to use something like Brewfather of Beersmith, set yourself up an equipment profile, and each time you brew make meticulous notes. Note down how much water you used, when you added some, did you top anything up, how much ended up in the fermenter etc.

The more you brew and note this down, the more you can fine tune the equipment profile, which will get you a more accurate repeatable result. Then, when you see a recipe, you input that into your program and it will scale the ingredients for you.

Say I found a recipe that's for 2.5 Gallons, I can pop it into Beersmith, scale it to my system and it will adjust for my efficiency, my batch size etc and tell me how much grain I need, how much hops, water etc etc.


It can be quite confusing, and will take some time. BIAB does simplify the process a little. If you let me know how big the pot you are using is, we can try and work out some rough numbers to get you started and then you can dial it in as you go?
 

paddy.odwyer

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No need to apologise for learning mate!

So, I think it's a normal mash when you do a mash and sparge. It's called a full volume mash if you do the entire amount. It really depends on a number of variables as to how much water you need.

Grain will absorb roughly 1 Litre / 1 kg, so if you use 4kg of grain you will need 4L of water just to end up recovering what the grain absorbs.

You also need to know how much you evaporate during the boil, which will help determine how much water you need to start the boil with. This is your 'pre boil volume' and it differs depending on ambient temp, humidity, elevation, size of boil kettle, how vigorous you boil etc.

Then, to work out how much grain you need to start with, you need to know your efficiency. This means, if the recipe is designed for 75% efficiency, and you only get 60%, you will need to increase the grain amount. This increases how much water is absorbed, and thus how much you need to start with.

You also need to know how much is lost to your particular mash tun (if you can't recover some due to false bottoms or what not, and how much is lost to the kettle which you can't recover.

There are a number of other things which you need to factor in, which determine how much water you need in total, this is why I said you don't usually find a recipe that states "start with x litres of water" etc, because every system is different.

I know in my Guten, I will lose around 3L / Hour of boil, and I lose about 3.5L to trub and unrecovered kettle loss, which means if I want to end up with 21L in the fermenter, I start with 27.5L before I boil. If I know that I am using 5kg of grain, I need 5L ontop of the 27 which is around 32L. Therefore, if I start with 32L, I know I will end up with about 21L in the fermenter.

I also know with my system, that there is 6.5L of liquid under the false floor which doesn't make it to the grain, this is called 'recoverable' mash liquid, but does not factor into the water:grist ratio that you often see people talk about. A good rule of thumb is about 3L of water to every kilo of grain. So, I would need 15L for 5kg of grain, plus my 6.5L makes it 21.5L of water for my mash. I round up to 22L, which leaves 10L for sparging.

I hope this made sense for you?

The easiest way to dial in your process over time is to use something like Brewfather of Beersmith, set yourself up an equipment profile, and each time you brew make meticulous notes. Note down how much water you used, when you added some, did you top anything up, how much ended up in the fermenter etc.

The more you brew and note this down, the more you can fine tune the equipment profile, which will get you a more accurate repeatable result. Then, when you see a recipe, you input that into your program and it will scale the ingredients for you.

Say I found a recipe that's for 2.5 Gallons, I can pop it into Beersmith, scale it to my system and it will adjust for my efficiency, my batch size etc and tell me how much grain I need, how much hops, water etc etc.


It can be quite confusing, and will take some time. BIAB does simplify the process a little. If you let me know how big the pot you are using is, we can try and work out some rough numbers to get you started and then you can dial it in as you go?
Wow, thanks so much for all of this information, it’s made everything a whole lot clearer and I feel like I can now really start to hone in on my particular process and efficiency, now that I know what to look out for and what to take note of!

My kettle is only 30L and from the previous two brews (both around pre-boil volumes of 26L) I lost roughly 4L to evaporation during each 1 hour boil. I overzealously order the grains as soon as I decided to try the recipe, and they’re all packaged in the one bag so I can’t really reduce my grain bill without potentially messing up the ratio of base to specialty malts, so I think it’s just going to have to be a slightly higher gravity beer. Given that...my plan was to mash in with 23L and the full grain bill in Klarko’s recipe, sparge with additional 8L which would bring me to roughly 26L pre-boil volume (factoring in what you told me about grain absorption). I lose about 2L transferring from kettle to fermenter and then another 1-2L in the fermenter, so all up hoping for 22-23L batch size. The one thing I’ve been unable to calculate is figure out what my new original gravity should be considering I’m using less water yet the same grain bill. I think I would need to know more concretely what my brew house efficiency is to be able to accurately calculate that?

Anyways, again I really appreciate your help and for all the valuable info. I’m really enjoying learning more and more about getting a consistent, reliable brewing process.

Cheers, Paddy.
 

kadmium

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Yeah for sure mate, always happy to help.

Have you got access to something like Brewfather or Beersmith?

Brewfather has a free version which is pretty good then its like $25 a year I think?

If you set up your equipment profile on it, you should be able to hone in over time.

No issues if you end up overshooting your gravity. Worst case if you're way over, you can dilute with a little water, or just take it as it is. I usually just keep it at what it comes out as.

I'm busy trying to dial in a new grain mill and I undershot my OG by 7 points and then overshot on the next. It takes a while to get it dialled in exactly!

I think your plan sounds solid, and just keep track of the numbers and then you will remember what you did next time.

I use Brewfather and also take hand notes, covering everything including recipe, pre boil volumes and gravity, og, fermentation, yeast pitch dates, final gravity, notes on what happened etc. Helps me next time if I want to tweak my recipe!
 

paddy.odwyer

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Yeah for sure mate, always happy to help.

Have you got access to something like Brewfather or Beersmith?

Brewfather has a free version which is pretty good then its like $25 a year I think?

If you set up your equipment profile on it, you should be able to hone in over time.

No issues if you end up overshooting your gravity. Worst case if you're way over, you can dilute with a little water, or just take it as it is. I usually just keep it at what it comes out as.

I'm busy trying to dial in a new grain mill and I undershot my OG by 7 points and then overshot on the next. It takes a while to get it dialled in exactly!

I think your plan sounds solid, and just keep track of the numbers and then you will remember what you did next time.

I use Brewfather and also take hand notes, covering everything including recipe, pre boil volumes and gravity, og, fermentation, yeast pitch dates, final gravity, notes on what happened etc. Helps me next time if I want to tweak my recipe!
Thanks Kadmium. We did the brew two days ago and it was a relative success. We had to add a bit of pre-boiled water after the boil to get the gravity right, but other than that it was pretty much perfect, and I think the reason we had to do that is because I totally stuffed up or pre-boil gravity target calculation haha. I'll definitely get onto brew smith or brewfather, but is it worth doing it if I'm just doing BIAB? I was under the impression it would only be really reliable with a proper all grain system that had a lauter tun etc, because squeezing the bag could be so unpredictable?

Cheers, Paddy.
 

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