Quantcast

Yeast Starter

Aussie Home Brewer

Help Support Aussie Home Brewer:

chiefman

Well-Known Member
Joined
22/2/05
Messages
69
Reaction score
0
I know its probably better to use a better quality yeast than then ones that come with the coopers kits.
My question is, would it be worth while to make a yeast starter from the Coopers Yeast. I.E would there be any noticeable diffrence ?
 

barfridge

Small fridge, powerful thirst
Joined
14/5/04
Messages
1,043
Reaction score
1
THe simple answer to your question is yes, you do end up with a much better beer if you make a starter.

The reason for this is you want a 'good' yeast to be in control of your ferment. I believe some wild yeasts multiply at a rate of about 10x faster than a 'tame' yeast, so the reasoning is to build up the numbers of good yeast quickly, so they can be the dominant yeast in the brew.

Think of it as survival of the fittest, where you want a larger number of a less aggressive strain to overpower a stronger wild yeast.

Apologies if I haven't explained this too well, its been a very long day
 

Plastic Man

Well-Known Member
Joined
4/11/04
Messages
483
Reaction score
0
Barfridge.

That's probably the best explaination I've read !!!
 

TidalPete

BREWING BY THE BEACH
Joined
2/8/04
Messages
5,182
Reaction score
480
Location
Sunshine Coast, Queensland
barfridge said:
THe simple answer to your question is yes, you do end up with a much better beer if you make a starter.

The reason for this is you want a 'good' yeast to be in control of your ferment. I believe some wild yeasts multiply at a rate of about 10x faster than a 'tame' yeast, so the reasoning is to build up the numbers of good yeast quickly, so they can be the dominant yeast in the brew.

Think of it as survival of the fittest, where you want a larger number of a less aggressive strain to overpower a stronger wild yeast.

Apologies if I haven't explained this too well, its been a very long day
[post="47897"][/post]​
That is good advice.
One of the easiest ways to get your dry yeast going is to add a tablespoon of malt extract to 250ml of water, boil for a couple of minutes, cool the solution down to 25 deg c, add your dry yeast & wait for it to show signs of strong activity (40 minutes or so), then pitch it into your wort. :) :)
 

dickTed

Well-Known Member
Joined
28/11/04
Messages
262
Reaction score
0
I made a starter from Coopers yeast a day in advance, and it was foaming nicely an hour later, but had finished by the next day. It ferments rather quickly. Start it early on brew day.
 

Ross

CraftBrewer
Joined
14/1/05
Messages
9,262
Reaction score
370
I'm no yeast expert & can't remember the exact reason, but GT over at Grumpys says that making up a starter from dried yeast is detrimental - they should be just rehydrated & not made into a starter...
 

TidalPete

BREWING BY THE BEACH
Joined
2/8/04
Messages
5,182
Reaction score
480
Location
Sunshine Coast, Queensland
Ross said:
I'm no yeast expert & can't remember the exact reason, but GT over at Grumpys says that making up a starter from dried yeast is detrimental - they should be just rehydrated & not made into a starter...
[post="60287"][/post]​
Dunno if that's right or wrong Ross. I'm only going by my old (and I mean old) homebrewing book. Techniques change I guess, but I never had any problems with the book's advice when I used dried yeasts. It also had a section on yeast hydration but reckoned the way in my other post above was better. :D :D
 

macr

Well-Known Member
Joined
14/3/05
Messages
265
Reaction score
0
I was in my LHBS this morning talking about this very subject. His opinion was that you do not need to make starters or re hydrate dry yeast, as the manufacturers have improved the yeast quality over the years and that re hydration is not required.
 

jayse

Black Label Society
Joined
25/7/03
Messages
3,402
Reaction score
10
Dried yeast plus warm water, that is undoubtly the correct way to do it! :ph34r:

Sorry for the one liner answer but I don't feel like arguing a point of a very commonly known fact. You either believe it or not.


Jayse
 

cubbie

Well-Known Member
Joined
28/1/05
Messages
451
Reaction score
1
Jasye, Dried yeast plus warm water is rehydration, and yes it should be done. But I think the above posts are questioning making a starter.


For the record I rehydrate only any dry ale yeast I use and make a starter for a dry lager yeast ( so to increase the pitching rate).

My recomendation go for a liquid yeast.
 

sosman

beerling
Joined
16/2/04
Messages
1,461
Reaction score
4
cubbie said:
Jasye, Dried yeast plus warm water is rehydration, and yes it should be done. But I think the above posts are questioning making a starter.

For the record I rehydrate only any dry ale yeast I use and make a starter for a dry lager yeast ( so to increase the pitching rate).

My recomendation go for a liquid yeast.
[post="60336"][/post]​
http://www.fermentis.com/FO/EN/06-Ales/40-...rections_hb.asp

If a dried yeast gives you the profile you want, why stuff around with a liquid yeast. OTOH, since the range of dried yeast is limited, for certain beer styles there is no "genuine" dried yeast available.
 

nonicman

Slack Brewery
Joined
20/7/04
Messages
845
Reaction score
1
Dr Clayton Cone on Dry yeast rehydration

Dr Cone makes dried yeast, the page that the above link is on contains a number of yeast question and answers relivant to points raised in this thread. Some very experienced brewers pick Dr Cone's brain. Hopes this helps.

Quick edit to add a quote to advertise the above link :)


How do many beer and wine makers have successful fermentations when they ignore all the above? I believe that it is just a numbers game. Each gram of Active Dry Yeast contains about 20 billion live yeast cells. If you slightly damage the cells, they have a remarkable ability to recover in the rich wort. If you kill 60% of the cell you still have 8 billion cells per gram that can go on to do the job at a slower rate.
 

nonicman

Slack Brewery
Joined
20/7/04
Messages
845
Reaction score
1
Just a note in regard to dry Lager yeast and my above trumpting of Dr Cone, on the above post link Dr Cone writes about lager yeast Saccharomyces Uvarum (Carlsbergensis) and not having released it commerically. The Jovial Monk has obtained the said lager yeast in dried form so since the Q&A session with Dr Cone in the above link a dried form of Saccharomyces Uvarum has been produced. Please correct if I am wrong but many of the dried yeasts named as lager yeasts are a form of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (ale yeast), and if so Dr Cone rehydation methods maybe pertinent.

Edit: I pitched a Safale on Sunday (over smacked the "smack" pack so the starter wasn't ready) after rehydating in warm water, air lock activity in 30 minutes, "no complain" as a certain past fruiter's wife would say.
 

Trough Lolly

"Drink, Feck, Arse, Girls"!
Joined
21/8/03
Messages
1,692
Reaction score
7
I always re-hydrate my dry yeast in 300ml of tepid water - no malt is used since it hinders the rehydration of the cell walls in anticipation for the munch fest that they get when they're in the wort.

Liquid yeast is another matter - a step up starter wort the day before is the go.

So whether I use one or the other depends on what I've got in the fridge door (dry yeast sachets or stubby starters). I like the dry yeast as a backup in case the carefully fed and aerated liquid yeast starter simply doesn't get up and go - it's a piece of wee wee just getting a sachet of dry yeast in a pyrex jug looking like a cuppacino in less than an hour!!

Cheers,
TL
 

Ross

CraftBrewer
Joined
14/1/05
Messages
9,262
Reaction score
370
nonicman said:
Dr Clayton Cone on Dry yeast rehydration

Dr Cone makes dried yeast, the page that the above link is on contains a number of yeast question and answers relivant to points raised in this thread. Some very experienced brewers pick Dr Cone's brain. Hopes this helps.

[post="60365"][/post]​
Great little link nonicman - answered a lot of questions....thanks...
 

sluggerdog

Beer In Here
Joined
12/10/04
Messages
1,865
Reaction score
26
Ross said:
nonicman said:
Dr Clayton Cone on Dry yeast rehydration

Dr Cone makes dried yeast, the page that the above link is on contains a number of yeast question and answers relivant to points raised in this thread. Some very experienced brewers pick Dr Cone's brain. Hopes this helps.

[post="60365"][/post]​
Great little link nonicman - answered a lot of questions....thanks...
[post="60414"][/post]​
Very interesting info, I only just started re-hydrating my dry yeast but NEVER had a problem when I didn't, maybe it's not worth the hassle...
 

warrenlw63

Just a Hoe
Joined
4/5/04
Messages
7,202
Reaction score
11
No intention of stealing Nonicman's thunder... However you Queenslanders must only trust Queenslanders. :p

I kinda put the link up before him :blink:

Warren -

warrenlw63 said:
Do a Google search for anything relating to Dr. Clayton Cone.

He's the knowledge bank re; dried yeasts. I've heard similar things to Ross. That said I've made starters for dried yeasts in the past with pretty good results.

http://consumer.lallemand.com/danstar-lalvin/beerfaq.html


Warren -
[post="60292"][/post]​

Aw geez thanks Warren... That's OK guys - :(

Warren -
 

nonicman

Slack Brewery
Joined
20/7/04
Messages
845
Reaction score
1
warrenlw63 said:
No intention of stealing Nonicman's thunder... However you Queenslanders must only trust Queenslanders. :p

Aw geez thanks Warren... That's OK guys - :(

Warren -
[post="60420"][/post]​
Sorry Warren, but it's hard to know what you Southerners are up to :)
 

Latest posts

Top