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Yeast Process Validation & Yeast Storage Limitations

Discussion in 'Yeast' started by Luxo_Aussie, 18/7/19.

 

  1. Luxo_Aussie

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    Posted 18/7/19
    G'day All,

    I've been brewing for awhile and wanted to see if what I was doing with my yeasts was right or needed some amending.

    Generally, my current process is as follows :
    1) Buy liquid yeast, smack (or not) & add to 1.5L starter with 150g LDME and let this fully ferment.
    2) Once fermentation has completed, cold crash to bring everything to the bottom and then decant majority & store remaining slurry into 4 small jars. Seal & refrigerate.
    3) When batch is needed, create starter 1L starter (2L for lagers) with either 100g or 200g of LDME respectively and let this fully ferment.
    4) Cold crash and decant majority & then pour remainder into awaiting wort.
    Does this sound like a reasonable process or am I missing something?

    Furthermore, with the yeasts which I'm storing in the fridge, how long are they good for after initially cultured? Are we talking three months, 6 months or even longer?

    Cheers & Thanks in Advance
     
  2. rude

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    Posted 18/7/19
    The size of the starter depends on viability of the yeast
    So using an online yeast calculator , the date of the pkt ,size of the wort , specific gravity will tell you what size starter to use
    As for storing the yeast the viability goes down pretty quickly fresh is best in my opinion
    I ferment out and pour off but others like to pitch actively
    More qualified than me will hopefully chime in and help here
     
  3. peteru

    Here, taste this!

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    Posted 18/7/19
    Providing you can get your timing right at step 3, you can skip step 4. In other words, try to mostly ferment out your starter and pitch the whole starter. Ideally you would ferment your starter at temperatures that are similar to what you will be fermenting your beer at. The idea behind this is that you don't give the yeast temperature shocks by cold crashing it and then pitching the cold yeast into warm wort again.
     
  4. wide eyed and legless

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