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Yeast - Are You A Stirrer Or A Sprinkler?

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wbosher

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Hi guys,

I've read a lot of conflicting information about this topic on the Googles, what are your opinions?

Is there any real benefit in either approach, or does it really make no difference?
 

Yob

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Hi guys,

I've read a lot of conflicting information about this topic on the Googles, what are your opinions?

Is there any real benefit in either approach, or does it really make no difference?
For Dry Yeast?

Always Rehydrate as per Manuf. Specs. (The Pro Versions)

I always Liked Danstars advice and this forms the method I use with all dry Yeast (Temps as per Manuf. Instruction for the specific Yeast)

Capture.JPG
 

mckenry

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Hi guys,

I've read a lot of conflicting information about this topic on the Googles, what are your opinions?

Is there any real benefit in either approach, or does it really make no difference?
Best approach is to rehydrate (plenty of info here) and when you stir, give it a good thrashing to help it get off to a good start.
 

wbosher

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Best approach is to rehydrate (plenty of info here) and when you stir, give it a good thrashing to help it get off to a good start.
Yeah, I've heard that's a good way of going it. Don't you have to be really careful with temperature control?
 

lukiferj

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I have only started rehydrating dry yeast on my last few brews and the results have been amazing. Seems to kick off fermetnation quickly and finish much sooner than just dumping the dry yeast in. Plenty of info on the forums about this. Once you start rehydrating it's not too much of a step to start reusing your yeast and saving money :icon_cheers:
 

bruce86

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How to brew has an online edition for free the yeast chapter is awesome. Will help you out on everything if you are looking for a helping guide.
 

mckenry

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Yeah, I've heard that's a good way of going it. Don't you have to be really careful with temperature control?
If you mean during rehydration - you do, but the limits are pretty generous.

See this discussion I started ages ago

Yeast rehydration
 

wbosher

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I've read a little bit about rehydration and it just doesn't seem worth it. Possible introduction of infection and shock, it just seems safer to pitch it dry. Or am I being a little over cautious?

Anyway, when pitching dry are there any benefits to be gained by stirring, or just best to sprinkle on top?
 

Yob

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I've read a little bit about rehydration and it just doesn't seem worth it. Possible introduction of infection and shock, it just seems safer to pitch it dry. Or am I being a little over cautious?
Read more.

There are more benefits to rehydration than the negatives..
 

SJW

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When I use dry yeast, I follow manufacturers instructions. If it says sprinkle on top thats what I do.
 

Lord Raja Goomba I

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I've started rehydrating dry yeast for some beers - noticeably anything that requires US-05. I find it tends to flocc out quicker.

However, for some beers (such as English style Pales and Milds), I've been pitching straight in to cause enough yeast stress (not much, but enough) to give me the esters I prefer in those styles.

Pretty much a horses for courses thing, but rehydrated yeast takes off way better. I have another guy at work, who I've introduced to brewing BIAB, and he just hydates straight out every time, and then emails me saying "I've got like 4 inches of that foam on top", to which I say "good, you've got healthy, active yeast".

Goomba
 

mckenry

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I've read a little bit about rehydration and it just doesn't seem worth it. Possible introduction of infection and shock, it just seems safer to pitch it dry. Or am I being a little over cautious?

Anyway, when pitching dry are there any benefits to be gained by stirring, or just best to sprinkle on top?
Rehydration is always debated. I think the majority are in favour. Its easy once youve done it.
Youd have to do more reading to get this exactly right (so no-one quote me) but you'll lose something like 50% of your soldiers pitching dry. 50 may be over estimated, but I remember being shocked by what I read, and then always rehydrated.

As for stirring or sprinkling, again, more debate wrt dry yeast and does it need aeration, which comes from stirring.
I always rehydrated and stirred vigourously when I used dry yeast. It got my FG's down from 1.018 to the 1.012/13 mark, over pitching dry and 'dainty' stir.

You would benefit from reading up the differences in oxygenation and oxidation. Adding O2 at the start is good for yeast, adding O2 later, is bad for beer.
 

wbosher

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Ok, the more I read about rehydration the more it seems like a good idea. Got this from howtobrew.com

Re-hydrating Dry Yeast
1. Put 1 cup of warm (95-105F, 35-40C) boiled water into a sanitized jar and stir in the yeast. Cover with Saran Wrap and wait 15 minutes.
2. "Proof" the yeast by adding one teaspoon of extract or sugar that has been boiled in a small amount of water. Allow the sugar solution to cool before adding it to the jar.
3. Cover and place in a warm area out of direct sunlight.
4. After 30 minutes or so the yeast should be visibly churning and/or foaming, and is ready to pitch.


Note: Lallemand/Danstar does not recommend proofing after rehydration of their yeast because they have optimized their yeast's nutrional reserves for quick starting in the main wort. Proofing expends some of those reserves.




Sounds simple enough :)
 

benno1973

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If not rehydrating, I'm a sprinkler not a stirrer. Just can't be assed sanitising a spoon to do the stirring, so it's out of lazyness I guess.

But yes, option c - rehydrator, in general.
 

wbosher

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If not rehydrating, I'm a sprinkler not a stirrer. Just can't be assed sanitising a spoon to do the stirring, so it's out of lazyness I guess.

But yes, option c - rehydrator, in general.
Wouldn't you already have a sanitised spoon from stirring in the wort/water anyway?

But yes, I'm starting to be swayed from the dry side to option c
 

GalBrew

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Ok, the more I read about rehydration the more it seems like a good idea. Got this from howtobrew.com

Re-hydrating Dry Yeast
1. Put 1 cup of warm (95-105F, 35-40C) boiled water into a sanitized jar and stir in the yeast. Cover with Saran Wrap and wait 15 minutes.
2. "Proof" the yeast by adding one teaspoon of extract or sugar that has been boiled in a small amount of water. Allow the sugar solution to cool before adding it to the jar.
3. Cover and place in a warm area out of direct sunlight.
4. After 30 minutes or so the yeast should be visibly churning and/or foaming, and is ready to pitch.


Note: Lallemand/Danstar does not recommend proofing after rehydration of their yeast because they have optimized their yeast's nutrional reserves for quick starting in the main wort. Proofing expends some of those reserves.




Sounds simple enough :)
The online edition of how to brew is quite out of date compared to the hard copy. Palmer himself has said proofing is no longer necessary and is detrimental to yeast performance. Dehydrated yeast are at full capacity in terms of their energy reserves and if you proof them you are just using that energy up for no reason. Just rehydrate......and buy a copy of How to Brew (my copy is the 3rd ed).
 

Markbeer

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If you can't be bothered rehydrating, sprinkling is better than stirring as it is gentler on the yeast.

They rehydrate themselves in the wort more slowly then if forced in by stirring.

Personal experimentation of dozens of brews has shown this for me.

But best to rehydrate.
 

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